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Russian and Central Eurasian Studies

ECON 231 1W                                   European Economic History

4 Credits
Wishart, David

Prerequisite:  Economics 190S

This course examines the evolution of capitalism in Europe from the Paleolithic period to the present, the impact of European capitalism on economies and societies in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, the rise and demise of centrally planned state socialist economies in Russia and the Eastern European countries, and European economic integration. The topics presented in this course will emphasize the use of principles of economics to understand historical change and methods of empirical analysis that are commonly used by economic historians. Grades will be determined by two exams, a final, and a 10-15 page term paper. Lecture/discussion format. Writing Intensive.

 

ECON 275C 01                                 Economies in Transition
4 Credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisite: Econ 190

Transition economics, a new field since the early 1990s, explores the process and results of the decisions of the nation states of the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and East Asia to move from centrally-planned toward market and from socialist toward capitalist economies. A central focus of the course will be the examination of the strategies pursued and progress of transition in these countries at the macro and sectoral levels, the institutions that have evolved, and the human welfare consequences of the transition process. This course meets the non-Western goal (C) and is cross-listed with East Asian, Russian, and Central Eurasian Area Studies; offered every 3rd semester. Students may register for a cultures and languages across the curriculum module. See the language descriptions for details about the CLAC Program.
 

GEOG 250C/S 1W 2W                     Russian and Central Eurasian Geography
4 Credits
Medvedkov, Olga

Pre-requisites: None

For the first time in all Russian history geography speaks for itself. After the disintegration of the Soviet Empire regions became exceedingly important in this highly centralized state. The current government is trying to reestablish control over the regions. Who will win in this geo-political game? Will Russia become a democratic state or it will pull back to the dictatorship? Will newly independent states like Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan gravitate to Russian economic and political domain or create new alliances with other bordering countries?
We will discuss it throughout the course. The class will be focused on changing space economy, environmental and population issues, national identity problems, political orientation in different regions of the post-Soviet space. This course has a lecture-discussion-project format. Students are expected to complete several map assignments, participate in class discussions, and to write a final paper on major topics.
 

POLI 204H 01                                    Russian Politics
4 Credits
LaPorte, Jody

Prerequisites:  None

The purpose of this class is to give the student an introduction to the politics of Russia and post-Soviet Eurasia.  There are four general goals: (1) to enable the student to write and talk about the area in a well-informed manner; (2) to give students an in-depth understanding of what the Soviet Union was; (3) to enable the student to understand domestic politics in Russia and post-Soviet Eurasia since 1991; and (4) to help students analyze whether historical forces or current conditions shape domestic politics in the region today.  A midterm exam, final exam, and a short research paper are required.

 

POLI 309 1W                                     Adv. Topics:  The Politics of Non-Democratic Regimes
4 Credits
LaPorte, Jody

Prerequisites:  POLI 102S and Jr class standing

This course is designed to introduce students to the politics of non-democratic regimes.  Over recent decades, many political science theories focused on the construction of democracy. However, in many parts of the world authoritarianism is proving remarkably resilient. This course addresses the gap between these theories and empirical realities by focusing on the dynamics of authoritarian rule.  The first section of the course explores the forms that non-democracy takes around the world, asking: Who rules in these regimes?  The second section of the course examines how rulers stay in power, and how some citizens resist government intrusion into their daily lives. Students will be expected to complete several writing assignments and to participate actively in class discussions.
WRITING INTENSIVE
 

RUSS 105 01                                     Russian for Professionals
4 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite: None.  Open to SCE Students only.

First course of a two-course sequence (with RUSS 106F) enabling adults to achieve language competency goals within the context of their professional and personal interests. This sequence introduces Russia's language and culture. The course meets once a week, using the most up-to-date methodology, including video, multimedia language lab, and web-accessed exercises that allow students to work at their own pace. The textbook is accompanied by an instructor-developed manual that enables students to work on assignments between class meetings. Completion of the follow up RUSS 106F with a grade of C- or higher satisfies the Wittenberg Foreign Language Competency requirement.

RUSS 111 01                                     Beginning Russian I
5 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Afraid of the Russian alphabet? Believe it or not, you already know almost half of it if you know Latin (our) alphabet and a little Greek from being a member of a sorority or a fraternity! After just five days you will be able to read many words that are borrowed from other languages! We use the computer to help us, too! Recent world economic events have convinced us that Russia is indeed an important player in the international economic arena. Don't be left behind! This course also will teach you how to speak and write Russian while learning the structure of the language. In addition, the text for the course is accompanied by an extensive online workbook with many types of exercises to help you succeed.

RUSS 260F 1.2                                  Understanding Contemporary Russian Social Issues
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Introduction to reading skills in Russian by using authentic materials from the contemporary Russian press found on the World Wide Web. Discussion of social and cultural issues in today's Russian society.

RUSS 263F 1.1                                  Russian Film and Culture
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level

Through the study of Russian, students will watch and discuss films that acquaint students with contemporary Russian life. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to discuss the portrayals of family, relationships, changing value systems, and social questions as reflected in Russian film. This course will also help students gain additional language skills in speaking and aural comprehension and includes a thorough review of the case system.

RUSS 317 1.1                                                National Identity
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite:  Russian 262, 264, or 316

With a focus on the New Russia as a result of the fall of the Soviet Union, this course examines some of the major cultural responses to the social and political changes in Post-Soviet life.  It explores issues of how Russians define themselves as an individual as a result of the loss of the collective in Post-Soviet society.  Taught in Russian.

 

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