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Archaeology - Fall 2014

ARCH 103N Introduction to Archaeology
4 hours
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:  None
This course provides an introduction to the history, methods, theory, and broader social context of modern archaeological practice. As a field dedicated to the study of the human past through the examination of material remains, the course examines a variety of methods such as scientific excavation, satellite imaging, materials analysis, paleopathology, ethnography, underwater archaeology, and landscape archaeology. In this class, we will explore some of the major questions that interest archeologists now, how these questions compare to archaeological work in previous generations, and the sources of evidence used to investigate the questions. ARCH 103 introduces minors to the field of archaeology and provides a foundation for advanced classes in anthropology, archaeology, geology, history, and religion. Two field excavation days, or laboratory days are part of the course requirements. 

 

ART 101A - Studio Foundations: Two-Dimensional Design
4 credit hours
Prebys, Crispin - Koch Hall

No prerequisites.  This course is required for all art majors, but it is open to non-art majors.
Should be taken freshman year. Course will deal with the underlying principles basic to all visual experience.  The course will contain, but not be limited to, color theory, line, shape, visual perception and the nature of creativity.  This is a studio course that includes lectures on basic theory and production assignments that coincide with text material. Course meets general education requirement in fine, performing and literary arts.  There is a materials fee for this course.

 

ART 103A - Studio Foundations: Three-Dimensional Design
4 credit hours
Staff - Koch Hall

No prerequisites. Open to non-art majors.
Required for all studio art majors. An exploration of the formal use of space as it is applied to three-dimensional form.  The student will be introduced to the elements of height, width, depth, volume and form.  Project research will be in the realm of non-objectivity, abstraction and reality.  Particular attention will be given to the techniques of drawing, model making and presentation of a final solution.  Emphasis will be placed on creative thinking and problem solving in the context of small-scale and larger projects.

It should be noted that this course requires extensive work beyond the regular class period, and no student should register for the class unless s/he has the time available for outside work.  A materials fee will be charged to cover supplies for the projects.

 

ART 110H  – Art History I
4 credit hours
Gimenez-Berger, Alejandra – Koch Hall

No prerequisite.
A selective chronological survey of architecture, painting, sculpture and decorative arts from the birth of art in the Prehistoric period through its development in the Middle Ages, with an emphasis on the Western tradition. 

 

ART 121A - Basic Drawing
4 credit hours
Mann, Jack - Koch Hall

No prerequisite.  This course is required for all studio art majors, but is open to non-art majors.
Part of the first-year foundations sequence.  This course introduces the basic disciplines of drawing:  line, value, composition, etc. There is special emphasis on drawing as a tool for
gathering ideas.

 

ART 271 - Graphic Design
4 credit hours
Prebys, Crispin – Koch Hall

Prerequisite:  Art 101A or permission of instructor.
The area we call Graphic Design is a rich and complex amalgam of more than one creative area.  Its practice includes the creation of many different kinds of signage, industrial products and packaging.  It also promotes effective and creative uses of typography.  Finally, it has truly become its own area of expression, as proven by many recent designers, who have pushed this craft in exciting and experimental directions.
This course will attempt to touch on all the above areas as students explore how to communicate both aesthetically and purposefully using the visual language.  The student will apply the design process (which includes concept ideation through research, brainstorming, and drawing/sketching) to appropriately integrate two-dimensional design concepts with technological ingenuity.  The student will use digital media, including the Adobe Creative Suite programs, as tools for design refinement and production.  A materials fee is required for the course.

 

BIOLOGY 170 - Concepts of Biology: Biological Information, Reproduction, and Evolution    
(5 semester hours)         
Collier, Matthew
Yoder, Jay

Open to all students planning to major in biology
This course and Biology 180, required for the biology major, provide an overview of the primary concepts in biology and are prerequisites for upper level biology courses.  Students may take Biology 170B and Biology 180B in either order.  The major themes of this course are information flow from DNA to protein, animal reproduction, and evolution.  Students must also enroll in an accompanying lab section (BIOL 171).  The laboratory portion of the course will provide students with hands-on activities designed to reinforce lecture content and develop the basic scientific skills that are needed for future courses in the major.  Offered in the fall semester.

 

BIOLOGY 325 - Human Anatomy and Physiology  
(5 semester hours)
Pederson, Cathy

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180 and one upper-level biology course
Students will learn about the major systems of the human body in both lecture and laboratory.  Topics to be discussed include the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems.  Disease states will also be discussed.  Laboratories will focus on the anatomy and physiology of each system as they are discussed in the lecture portion of the course.  Laboratories will include dissection.  Assessment will include 3 written examinations, lab practical examinations, and a final examination. Offered every year.  

 

Chinese 211/01:  Intermediate Chinese I
(5 semester hours)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Chinese 112 or placement.
We will focus on continuing to build both your reading and speaking abilities in modern Chinese.  There will be an emphasis on reviewing the grammar we previously studied and mastering additional structures.  We will, of course, be learning new vocabulary and developing greater skill with the writing system of the language.  There will be many different activities aiming at improving your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 

ENGL 180A – “How Like a God”: Myth, Epic, and Metamorphosis
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce the student to the work of Greco-Roman myth.  With intensive readings of The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, and The Metamorphoses, this course not only will consider the various stories and ideas that myths construct and entail, but also will work to question the more modern myths by which we live today.  As a writing intensive section, this course will require a daily reading journal, several short essays, two examinations, and a final analytical paper.  The course will emphasize student engagement with the readings and ideas, so class sessions will entail lecture but rely heavily upon class participation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with the dominant myths of the ancients, as well as a broadened understanding of those myths by which we live—myths more naively known as reality.

 

French 260A/1.1:  La Vie contemporaine des francophones (Contemporary Francophone Culture)
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
Consideration of topics in contemporary life in francophone cultures with a focus on conversation, including study of practical vocabulary of daily life, and grammar review.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the university’s general education requirement for Foreign Language and contributes two credits towards the requirement for the Performing, Fine, and Literary Arts.

 

French 265H/1.2:  Qui sont les QuébécoisL’Identité nationale  (Who are the Québécois?  National Identity)  
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
An introduction to Québécois history and culture.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the university’s general education requirement for Foreign Language and contributes two credits towards the requirement for History.

 

GEOLOGY 150B - Physical Geology
(5 semester hours)
Bladh, Ken

Open to all students, except those who have previously taken Geology 110B-115B or 160B.
Geology 150 is a comprehensive introduction to the science of geology and how geology affects our lives every day.  The course is recommended for students who are interested in the possibility of a geology major or minor, other science majors, or anyone who is interested in Earth processes and history.  The course treats fundamentals of geology (such as igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes and rocks), Earth’s internal structure and processes as they relate to plate tectonics, volcanism and earthquakes, and Earth’s surface processes (such as landslides, river flooding, coastal erosion, and glaciation).  Labs include examination of various rock types and use of topographic maps, earth images, and geologic maps to evaluate the geologic history and risks of natural hazards of particular areas.  Some field experiences may also be included.  

 

GEOG 101S  01  Cultural Geography
4 Credits
Limoges, Lance

Pre-requisites:  None
The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the breadth of human geography and in particular how populations influence the way the environment is developed and utilized by people and the subsequent patterns they create on the landscape.  Topics will include: the spatial organization of human activities, ways in which social processes and structures can be understood through a geographic lens, geographic perspectives of human/environment interactions, patterns of economic activity, the relationship between political States and cultures, and the impact of globalization.  The course will follow a lecture/discussion format to enhance critical thinking and writing abilities.  In addition, the class will also require some out of class, off campus collection of data to complete exercises. The overall aim of the course is to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to think critically about contemporary geographical patterns and processes while also cultivating the student’s own geographical imagination. 

 

GEOG 230S 01  Urban Geography
4 Credits
Medvedkov, Olga

Pre-requisites:  Minimum Math Placement 22, Permission of instructor
World urbanization has increased dramatically in the course of the 20th century. More people in the world live in urban areas than in rural setting.  Developing countries, with large portion of their population yet in rural areas, face an extremely fast rate of urbanization, and lead the world in number of mega-cities, often surrounded by shanty towns.  Is this development sustainable?
Developed countries are facing urban sprawl that drives demand for energy resources further. Is ‘smart growth’ a solution for addressing this problem? What is the origin of urban growth and decline in general, and how Midwestern cities are affected by de-industrialization? How spatial organization of North American cities is different from European, Latin American or Asian cities?

 

German 261/1.2:  Umwelt:  Natur und Kultur (Environment:  Nature and Culture)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
This is a content-based reading and conversation course that focuses on the role of the natural environment in the lives of contemporary Germans; it explores some of the distinctive ways in which those Germans express their regard and concern for the natural world.

 

German 262/1.1:  Eomführung in die Kunst des Ãœbersetzens (Introduction to the Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
An introduction to the theory and practice of good translation, including a consideration of the demands of translating different types of texts and a consideration of the broader cultural issues inherent in the practice of translation.  Review of advanced grammar topics as well.

 

HIST 105 C/H 1W.  Pre-Modern World History
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Christian

Prerequisite:  none.   
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost?  Writing Intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 111H 1.   Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, A.

Prerequisite:  FYS Only – Advising Section Linked on Tuesdays Noon -1:00
The origins of medieval Europe are grounded in the world of Late Antiquity. This class begins with the last of the Western Roman Emperors by surveying the “barbarian” kingdoms that had been created in the fourth and fifth centuries. Essential to understanding Europe is the relationship between East and West. Starting with a dominant Byzantium in the early part of our course, we’ll examine ups and downs in the East/West relationship in the ninth and early twelfth centuries and their antagonistic relationship after 1204 and the sack of Constantinople. Essential to this story are the lives of women and religious minorities, such as Jews, Muslims, and pagans. Those stories will be woven in with the traditional highlights of the Middle Ages, such as Charlemagne’s ascension as Holy Roman Emperor, the Viking raids throughout Europe, the rise of the Normans and the conquest of England, the reform papacy and the Crusades, and the beginning of the Renaissance. Medieval Europe changed drastically over the thousand years studied in this course, and we will attempt to both understand the events and processes that contributed to that change as well as the shape of Europe at the end of our period.   This course counts toward the PAST minor. 

 

HIST 121H: United States History I
4.00 credits
Paddison, Josh

An introduction to U.S. history from pre-1492 through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. Using a mix of recent books by historians and primary sources created by people who lived during the era--including speeches, sermons, memoirs, diaries, laws, maps, cartoons, paintings, photographs, newspaper advertisements, popular songs, architecture, and material culture--we will explore the social, cultural, political, and economic history of early America. Not writing intensive. Assessment will focus on the students’ ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.

 

HIST 240H 1W: The Crusades
4.00 credits                                                   
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite:  none.
The Crusades continue to cast a long shadow over the history of the world. Recent political events have highlighted the importance of this conflict between Muslims and Christians has had on world events. This course will contextualize the Crusades in the medieval world by examining the following questions: Why did medieval people go on Crusade? What were the motives and experiences of the Crusaders? How did the Muslims view the Crusaders? How have scholars interpreted the Crusades? Students will read primary sources from the Crusades, as well as different interpretations of the Crusades, their history and their impact. Students will write a several short essays, two essay exams, as well as other shorter assignments, and make presentations. Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 312 1W.   Age of Cathedrals
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy     

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
One of the most enduring images of the medieval world is the cathedral. Have you ever wondered why medieval people felt compelled to create such monumental structures? How did they build cathedrals? Who built them? This course will explore the society that produced these magnificent monuments. Our discussion will begin with the art and society of the period preceding the Age of Cathedrals: the Romanesque.  Key to our discussion will be the pilgrimage churches that came to cover much of France and Northern Spain. How did faith and religious practice, as well as social and economic factors, contribute to the construction of these churches? Next we will examine how the Romanesque period transformed into the age of Gothic. Again the focus will be not only the artistic and aesthetic changes, but what economic, social and political changes led to the construction of cathedrals such as Chartres, St. Denis, Notre Dame, Amiens and Rheims. Why were cathedrals designed to capture light and to seem to ascend toward heaven? How do cathedrals reflect intellectual and philosophical developments of the central Middle Ages? Finally we will consider what impact cathedrals had on medieval civilization. How do cathedrals reflect the social and cultural changes that characterized the twelfth and thirteenth centuries?  Students will write three short papers, an in-depth research paper, and a synthetical essay. They will present their research to the class at the end of the semester.  Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

Religion 121R 1W Art of Biblical Literature
(4 semester hours)
Kaiser, Barbara
 
Pre-requisite:  Not open to students who have taken RELI 221R.

This course is intended to help readers appreciate the artistry of biblical prose and poetry.  We will examine texts from the Old and New Testaments and Apocrypha, paying special attention to plot structure, word-plays, imagery, repetition, characterization, themes, parallelism and aetiology.  Throughout the term, we will consider reinterpretations of biblical literature in the music, literature, and film of our own culture.  Class sessions have a lecture/discussion format.  There will be three or four exams and regular written responses to readings.  This course counts toward the PAST minor. Writing Intensive.

 

Religion 221R  1W   Understanding the Old Testament
(4 semester hours)
Kaiser, Barbara

Pre-requisite:  NONE
This course is designed especially for religion majors, pre-theological students, and others with a serious interest in biblical studies. We will attempt to place the Old Testament literature in its historical context, understand the theological perspectives which shape the texts, develop methods of interpretation, and simply appreciate the artistry and inspiration of the Old Testament literature. Class sessions have lecture/discussion format. Students will take three exams and write a paper. Counts to PAST Minor. Writing intensive.

 

Russian 260F/1.2:  Understanding Contemporary Russian Social Issues
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Introduction to reading skills in Russian by using authentic materials from the contemporary Russian press found on the World Wide Web.  Discussion of social and cultural issues in today’s Russian society.  

 

Russian 263F/1.1:  Russian Film and Culture
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Through the study of Russian, students will watch and discuss films that acquaint students with contemporary Russian life.  Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to discuss the portrayals of family, relationships, changing value systems, and social questions as reflected in Russian film.  This course will also help students gain additional language skills in speaking and aural comprehension and includes a thorough review of the case system.

 

Spanish 260F/1.1:  El mundo contemporáneo (Contemporary Issues of the Hispanic World)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course focuses on contemporary issues of the Hispanic world including topics such as immigration, politics, pop culture, economics, demography, religion, social class, and globalization.  The course will help students develop conversational skills and strategies.

 

SOCI 110C/S 01 & 02                      Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
4 Credits
Moskowitz, Nona

Pre-requisites:  None
What is culture?  Where is it located?  How does it make meaning in our lives?  In this course, we explore the diversity of human society by examining culture and the innumerable ways it permeates all facets of life.  In our readings we travel around the world looking at cross-cultural diversity in order to understand what culture is and to engage in the questions that cultural anthropologists ask.  From glimpsing into the world of ritual to understanding local, socially constructed meanings of gender and race, we will consider how meaning is constructed in particular, social contexts.  Other topics we will examine include kinship, language, emotion, and medicine and healing.  Understanding the cultural diversity in our world sheds light on our own practices and systems of meaning.  With this in mind, we look abroad in order to understand our own practices here in the United States.

 

SOCI 201S 01                                   Urban Geography
4 Credits
Medvedkov, Olga

Pre-requisites:  Minimum Math Placement 22, Permission of instructor
World urbanization has increased dramatically in the course of the 20th century. More people in the world live in urban areas than in rural setting.  Developing countries, with large portion of their population yet in rural areas, face an extremely fast rate of urbanization, and lead the world in number of mega-cities, often surrounded by shanty towns.  Is this development sustainable?
Developed countries are facing urban sprawl that drives demand for energy resources further. Is ‘smart growth’ a solution for addressing this problem? What is the origin of urban growth and decline in general, and how Midwestern cities are affected by de-industrialization? How spatial organization of North American cities is different from European, Latin American or Asian cities? All these questions and many more will be a focus of this course. A lecture/discussion format is anticipated, combined with field and computer lab assignments.

 

SOCI 277C/R 1W                             Islam and Islamic Societies
4 Credits
Pankhurst, Jerry

Pre-requisites:  None
This course will provide a broad introduction to the religion of Islam, accompanied by an examination of the connections between Islam and the varied life of Muslim societies and of Muslim minority communities in non-Muslim societies. We will seek to understand the complex sources of conflict in areas in which Islam is implicated in some way; we will also try to become acquainted with the rich cultural life of Muslims. We will consider Muslim societies all over the world, but, in support of the minor in Africana Studies, we will give a special emphasis to Islam in Africa and to African American Islam.

Course format: lecture/seminar, with much group discussion. Graded Requirements: A variety of writing exercises throughout the term, oral presentations, examinations and a term project.  Students should expect one or more alternative class meetings during the evening to accommodate guest speakers.  This course is Writing Intensive (W) and can be taken for either “C” or “R” credit in General Education.

 

Spanish 261F/1.1:  El mundo físico (The Physical World)
(2 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course serves as an introduction to the Hispanic world by highlighting the diverse nature and cultures of Spanish-speaking people focusing on speech patterns, climate, geography and environmental issues.  The course will also develop language skills that will enhance students’ ability to express themselves in Spanish.

 

Spanish 262F/1.2:  Entre dos mundos:  el arte de la traducción (Between Two Worlds:  The Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, 150, or 200 level placement
This intermediate course will introduce students to the theory (theories) and practices of translation.  Through translation practice from Spanish to English, and English to Spanish, students will focus on nuance, style and context of language/text.  Students will read selected essays on translation, read selected texts in dual language versions, and create their own translations of short texts.

 

Spanish 263F/1.2:  El cine y el cambio social (Film and Social Change)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, 150 or 200 level placement
This course introduces students to film from Spain and Latin America that intersect with social and historical transitions.  Students will explore the cultural context of each film, analyze major themes, and discuss the role of film as a reflection of and catalyst for social change.  The course will focus on aiding students in developing language skills for description and reporting.  Along with the practice/development of their language skills, students will learn basic principles of cinematic analysis and language.

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