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Chemistry - Fall 2014

CHEM 100N Chemistry & Society
4 credits
Hanson, Pete

Pre-requisite: Minimum Math Placement 22.
This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge to recognize and evaluate the role of chemistry in life and its associated activities. The first half of the course will be devoted to foundational concepts, including matter, elements and chemical reactions. The second half of the course will be devoted to two of the three following topics, determined by class interest: Environment, Energy and Resources, Health and Medicine.

 

CHEM 100N Chemistry & Society 4 credits
Houseknecht, Justin

Pre-requisite: Minimum Math Placement 22.
The purpose of a Natural World course in the General Education curriculum at Wittenberg is that “students should gain an understanding of the natural world through scientific inquiry and see the relations among science, technology, and contemporary culture” (Academic Catalog, General Education Requirements). This course will aim to accomplish these goals by introducing the central concepts of chemistry and using them to understand issues of social concern. Chemistry is primarily the science that deals with matter at the atomic and molecular scale. As such, this course will focus upon understanding atomic and molecular structure, how these change in chemical processes, and how these molecular changes relate to changes that can be observed. We will study the chemical changes involved with global warming, the ozone holes, acid rain, and fossil fuel consumption.

 

CHEM 121   Models of Chemical Systems I 5 credits        
Anderson, Amil; Cline, Kristin; Dudek, Ray

Pre-requisite:  Minimum Math Placement score of 24.

This is the first semester of the two-semester sequence in General Chemistry to be taken by all science majors.  Chem 121 introduces the student to the study of chemistry and the variety of models that are used to describe atoms, molecules and their reactions.  Topics include atomic and molecular structure, elementary bonding models, stoichiometry, gases, solutions, acid-base chemistry, thermochemistry and safety in chemistry.  Classroom sessions will include lecture and discussion of homework problems and labs.  Weekly lab experiments will parallel the content of the classroom activities.  There will be hour exams, a final exam and lab reports.  The primary methods of assessment are exams, lab reports and electronic homework assignments. 

 

CHEM 201   Introduction to Organic Chemistry
5 credits                                
Hanson, Pete; Houseknecht, Justin

Pre-requisite:  Chemistry 162. Required of all chemistry or BMB major and minor and the biology (B.S.) major degrees.  
This is the first course in organic chemistry.  The emphasis will be on bonding and structural theory, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and reactions of organic molecules.  Reaction mechanisms will be emphasized as the basis for understanding organic reactions.  The relation between chemical reactivity and biological processes will be presented throughout the semester.  Classes of organic molecules presented are alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, alcohols, organohalides, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Many problems will be assigned as homework.  The course will meet three hours per week and have a weekly 4-hour laboratory. The laboratory will emphasize the techniques for preparation, isolation, analysis, and identification of organic compounds.  Laboratory experience will be directly related to the course lecture.

 

CHEM 271   Principles of Biochemistry
4 credits                                
Anderson, Amil

Pre-requisites:  Chemistry 201 and Biology 170 or permission of instructor.
A survey of biochemistry is provided in this lecture-based course.  Topics to be covered include the structure and function of biological macromolecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids), a brief introduction to enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, biochemical thermodynamics, and a survey of metabolic pathways.  There is no laboratory with this course. 

 

CHEM 290  Introduction to Research                    
1-3 credits                                                                 
Staff

Pre-requisite:  Permission of the supervising instructor.
Introduction to research methodology through the study of a laboratory research problem (which can include computational research) under the close supervision of a member of the faculty.

 

CHEM 300   Junior Seminar
0 credits Fall Semester
Cline, Kristin

Required of each Chemistry major of junior standing.  Attendance at weekly one-hour seminars and discussions is required throughout the year.  Each student delivers a one-half hour presentation on a chemical topic prepared under the supervision of a member of the faculty.  Several sessions in the fall are devoted to bibliographic instruction, on-line searching, and standard formats for oral and written communication used by practicing chemists.  Students register for this course for 0 credits in the fall semester and for 1 credit in the spring semester. This class allows students to complete a Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Module (CLAC) for an additional credit.  You will find more information on the CLAC program in the Language Department’s course descriptions.

 

CHEM 311   Thermodynamics & Kinetics 
5 credits                                
Dudek, Ray

Prerequisites:  Chemistry 281, Math 202, and Physics 218. Recommended: Math 215.
This class offers an in depth look into the energy relationships that govern chemistry. It begins with the 4 laws of thermodynamics and exploring ideal systems, and ends with looking at complex mixtures and phase diagrams. The last portion of the course examines reaction kinetics and mechanisms.  Emphasis is placed on solving problems in class, both individually and as part of a group.  In the lab portion students will continue to learn good
scientific technique, different aspects of experimental design, and how to write lab reports in the ACS style. Writing Intensive.

 

CHEM 400   Senior Seminar
0 credits Fall Semester       
Cline, Kristin

Required of each Chemistry major of senior standing.  Attendance at weekly one-hour seminars and discussions is required throughout the year.  Each student writes a scientific paper and delivers a one-hour presentation on a chemical topic prepared under the supervision of a member of the faculty.  Several sessions in the fall are devoted to discussions of the social context in which science transpires in our culture and the ethical and professional issues of being a chemist.  Students register for this course for 0 credits in the Fall semester and for 1 credit in the spring semester.  Writing Intensive. This class allows students to complete a Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Module (CLAC) for an additional credit.  You will find more information on the CLAC program in the Language Department’s course descriptions.

 

CHEM 491   Internship                                           
2 - 4 credits
Staff

Pre-requisites:  Chem 281 and prior approval of the department.
Chemical research or activity during the summer or academic semester at an approved site or program.

 

CHEM 492    Directed Research                             
2 - 4 credits                                                               
Staff

Pre-requisite:  Chem 271, 311, 321 or 382 and permission of the supervising instructor.
Laboratory research project (which can include computational research) in collaboration with a member of the faculty.   This may be a more intense continuation of a project started in Chem 290.  Students must submit a comprehensive research report by the end of the semester.  This course may be repeated for credit.

 

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