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International Studies - Fall 2014

AFDS 201C/H 1W Introduction to African and Diaspora Studies.
4 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Introduction to the discipline of African and Diaspora Studies. Focus on the history (political, economic, psychological, artistic, and cultural) of people of African descent. Every year. No prerequisite.

 

BUSN 250C 01 International Business
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

Prerequisite: None. Every year.
Introduction to the broad area of international business. The social, economic and political environments of the multinational firm form the base on which the management structure, marketing processes and financing of the global corporation are studied. 02/13

 

ECON 190S 1M 2M 3M. Principles of Economics
4 credits
Tiffany, Frederick; Wishart, David

Prerequisites: Students must have attained the math placement level 22 to enroll.
An introduction to basic principles of economics.  Topics covered include supply and demand, marginal analysis, competition, profit maximization, aggregate demand, and supply, the level of employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and international trade.  Lecture/discussion format.

 

ENGL 371 1W. World Literature in English: Africa, Asia and the Caribbean
4 credits
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A, ENGL 280A or ENGL 290A
This course examines 20th and 21st century World Literatures from Africa, Asia and The Caribbean that respond to issues of identity, colonization and migration.  According to scholars Pin-Chia Feng and Kate Liu, “As English majors, we need to know that ‘English’ is not always British, and ‘American.” In this World Literature course we will read selected literature from Africa, Asia and The Caribbean that share studied issues of the influences of colonization, imperialism and the quest for identity.

 

GEOG 101S 01. Cultural Geography
4 credits
Limoges, Lance

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the breadth of human geography and in particular how populations influence the way the environment is developed and utilized by people and the subsequent patterns they create on the landscape. Topics will include: the spatial organization of human activities, ways in which social processes and structures can be understood through a geographic lens, geographic perspectives of human/environment interactions, patterns of economic activity, the relationship between political States and cultures, and the impact of globalization. The course will follow a lecture/discussion format to enhance critical thinking and writing abilities. In addition, the class will also require some out of class, off campus collection of data to complete exercises. The overall aim of the course is to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to think critically about contemporary geographical patterns and processes while also cultivating the student’s own geographical imagination. 

 

GEOG 240S 01. Economic Geography
4 credits
Limoges, Lance

Geography 240S introduces students to the study of economic geography. In particular, this course will explore how geographic and economic conditions affect the products, industries, commerce and resources of the world in general, and the United States in particular. The course begins with an examination of population and resources, followed by a thorough study of basic location theory for primary, secondary and tertiary industries. Then we will move on to study the role of geography in the modern global economy, particularly as it relates to spatial patterns in local, regional, national, and international economic growth and business development.

 

GEOG 250C/S 1W 2W. Russian and Central Eurasian Geography
4 credits
Medvedkov, Olga

For the first time in all Russian history geography speaks for itself.  After the disintegration of the Soviet Empire regions became exceedingly important in this highly centralized state. The current government is trying to reestablish control over the regions. Who will win in this geo-political game? Will Russia become a democratic state or it will pull back to the dictatorship? Will newly independent states like Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan gravitate to Russian economic and political domain or create new alliances with other bordering countries?

We will discuss it throughout the course.  The class will be focused on changing space economy, environmental and population issues, national identity problems, political orientation in different regions of the post-Soviet space. This course has a lecture-discussion-project format. Students are expected to complete several map assignments, participate in class discussions, and to write a final paper on major topics. 

 

HIST 106C/H 01.  Modern World
4 credits
Paddison, Josh

This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all of the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations. (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

POLI 251S International Relations
4 credits
Yu, Bin

This course begins with an overview of the evolution of international system. This is followed by the discussion of some key theoretical concepts and approaches in the study of international relations (IR).  Students will then apply IR history and theories to analyze some major issues in the 21st century, including international security, international political economy, nationalism, democratization, and global governance.  The course has a lecture/discussion format.  There will be a mid-term, a final exam, one short take-home paper, and a few quizzes.  02/14

 

POLI 253S International Political Economy
4 credits
Allan, James

This course provides an introduction to the subfield of international political economy, which
explores the linkages between politics and economics in the international system. We will first
critically examine the dominant theories used to interpret and explain patterns of international
economic relations. We will then examine institutions and features of the international political
economy, relating to areas such as trade, foreign investment, foreign aid, and relations
between "advanced industrial" and "less developed" countries. Evaluation will be based on a
midterm and a final exam, two short reflective papers, class participation, and a project that
uses computer software to assess major challenges to the international system.

Students will need their own personal computer or have regular access to a computer in a lab in order to run software used in this course.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don't need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in any of the six foreign languages offered by the languages department.  Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department's offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 02/14

 

POLI 302 1W North American Politics
4 credits
Allan, James
Prerequisite: POLI 102S and Junior/Senior standing
This course is a comparative survey of the political systems within North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States (although more emphasis will be placed on Canada and Mexico). Topics covered in the course from a comparative perspective include political culture and values, political institutions, federalism, paradiplomacy, political parties and electoral systems, public policies, and NAFTA. The course will also focus on politics across, as well as within, the three countries: are there commonalities among North American states? What is the impact of NAFTA and do attitudes to further economic integration vary across borders? What is the future of North American integration? Evaluation will be based on exams, class participation, and a research paper. 

WRITING INTENSIVE
Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don't need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Russian.
Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department's offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 02/14

 

PSYC 280C 01. Psychology & Culture
4 credits
Crane, Lauren

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (or higher)
People cannot speak without having an accent from somewhere. In much the same way, people's psychological functioning is not accent-free.  This course highlights the extent to which all levels of psychological functioning, even "basic" ones, are grounded in culture-specific assumptions about what matters, what is "good”, and how the world works. Students are expected to emerge from this class with a sharpened ability to critique generalizations made about human psychology, a greater appreciation of interpersonal diversity, and a richer understanding of how their own ways of thinking and being derive from culture-bound experiences. Course requirements include exams, research projects, and class participation. This course contains substantial East Asian content and counts toward the East Asian Studies major/minor. This course also includes an optional “Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum” (CLAC) component.

 

SOCI 110C/S 01 & 02 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona

What is culture?  Where is it located?  How does it make meaning in our lives?  In this course, we explore the diversity of human society by examining culture and the innumerable ways it permeates all facets of life.  In our readings we travel around the world looking at cross-cultural diversity in order to understand what culture is and to engage in the questions that cultural anthropologists ask.  From glimpsing into the world of ritual to understanding local, socially constructed meanings of gender and race, we will consider how meaning is constructed in particular, social contexts.  Other topics we will examine include kinship, language, emotion, and medicine and healing.  Understanding the cultural diversity in our world sheds light on our own practices and systems of meaning.  With this in mind, we look abroad in order to understand our own practices here in the United States.

 

SOCI 277C/R 1W Islam and Islamic Societies
4 credits
Pankhurst, Jerry

This course will provide a broad introduction to the religion of Islam, accompanied by an examination of the connections between Islam and the varied life of Muslim societies and of Muslim minority communities in non-Muslim societies. Given the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the West’s military reprisals and subsequent reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan, the war in Iraq, the ongoing struggle of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the devastation of the 2004 tsunami in Indonesia and elsewhere in the Indian Ocean basin, and other problem situations, knowledge of these issues has become of highest priority. We will seek to understand the complex sources of conflict in areas in which Islam is implicated in some way; we will also try to become acquainted with the rich cultural life of Muslims. We will consider Muslim societies all over the world, but, in support of the minor in Africana Studies, we will give a special emphasis to Islam in Africa and to African American Islam.

Course format: lecture/seminar, with much group discussion. Graded Requirements: A variety of writing exercises throughout the term, oral presentations, examinations and a term project.  Students should expect one or more alternative class meetings during the evening to accommodate guest speakers.  This course is Writing Intensive (W) and can be taken for either “C” or “R” credit in General Education.

 

SOCI 290S 01& 02 Global Change
4 credits
Nibert, David

Examination of the theories, processes, and consequences of global change with respect to the emergence of the contemporary global order. Topics include imperialism and the emergence of industrial capitalism, contemporary relationships of powerful capitalist nations to the Third World, growing levels of poverty, hunger, repression, and continued environmental destruction.

 

THDN 210C 01. Dance Ethnology
4 credits
Chang, Shih-Ming Li

The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge and understanding of different cultures around the world by comparing and analyzing the differences of their dances.  Through the understanding of the basic elements of time, space, and movement quality, the course will help students develop the ability to analyze different styles, forms, and functions of the dances of different countries and cultures. The course format includes video viewing, lecture/discussion, research, and learning some folk dances. Grading is based upon participation, assignments, a midterm, a final exam, and a presentation.

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