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Languages - Fall 2014

LANG 270/ LANG 370  Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC 
(1 semester hour)

Prerequisite:  You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 112).
Wittenberg offers a distinctive, nationally recognized Cultures and Language Across the Curriculum Program (CLAC) that allows students to use their language skills in a wide variety of disciplines.  You can read about the program in USA Today by following this link: 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2010-07-24-IHE_languages24_ST_N.htm

The courses listed below offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit by completing a CLAC module.  In the CLAC program, you will work your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you're learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language.  CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline.  You'll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e.  one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about the material you're studying and share your insights with your colleagues.  CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. 

The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience.  Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline.  CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.  To register for a CLAC experience in this course, speak with your instructor in the first two weeks of classes.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.

New courses and courses featured especially for Fall 2014: 

Art 340/1W, Modern Art, A. Gimenez-Berger
Biology 114, From Conception to Birth, M. McWhorter
Biology 214/1W,  Developmental Biology, M. McWhorter
Communication 190, Public Speaking, S. Broz
Economics 350/1W, Environmental & Natural Resource Economics, D. Wishart
Education 103S/2W, Sociological Perspectives in Education, B. Yontz
English 180A/3W, Demons, Devils, & Hellfire, R. Incorvati
English 308, Anarchy in the U.K.:  Studies in British Romantic Literature, R. Incorvati
English 372A/1W, Women in Literature I:  Bad Girls, C. Richards
Environmental Science 100, Global Climate Change, S. Fortner
Environmental Science 250, Environmental Science Research Methods, S. Fortner
Geography 250C/S/2W, Southeast Asia, R. Lenz
History 105C/H/1W, Pre-Modern World, C. Raffensperger
History 106, Modern World, J. Paddison
History 122H, United States History II, M. Wood
History 202/1W, Vietnam, M. Wood
History 240H/1W, Crusades, A. Livingstone
History 253C/H/1W, Soviet Russia, C. Raffensperger
History 309/1W, Eurasian Nomads:  Ancient & Medieval, C. Raffensperger
History 312/1W, Age of Cathedrals, A. Livingstone
Marine Science 200N-1M, Oceanography, J. Welch
Political Science 212R, Modern Political Philosophy, H. Wright
Political Science 216R, Family Values:  Politics of Virtue, Care, & Equality, H. Wright
Political Science 222S, Urban Politics, R. Baker
Political Science 230S, Campaigns and Elections, S. Rhine
Political Science 253, International Political Economy, J. Allan
Political Science 302/1W, North American Politics, J. Allan
Psychology 251/1W, Abnormal Psychology, S. Little
Psychology 280C, Topic:  Psychology & Culture, L. Crane
Psychology 400/1W, Research:  Abnormal, S. Little
Sociology 277C/R/1W, Islam & Islamic Societies, J. Pankhurst
Sociology 360/1W, Sociological Theory, J. Pankhurst

The Comprehensive List of Courses offering CLAC modules:

  • Art 280 (Honors 300), Art and Culture of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, Gimenez-Berger
  • Art 280 (Honors 300), Gender and Genius in Art, Gimenez-Berger
  • Art 340, Modern Art, Gimenez-Berger
  • Biology 221, Pharmacology, Pederson
  • Biology 214, Developmental Biology, McWhorter
  • Biology 310, Molecular Biology, Goodman
  • Chemistry 121, Models of Chemical Systems, Finster
  • Chemistry 302, Organic Chemistry, Hanson
  • Chemistry 281, Analytical Chemistry, Cline
  • Chemistry 300/400, Junior and Senior Seminar, Cline
  • Communication 190, Public Speaking, Broz
  • Communication 222, Graphic Storytelling, Smith
  • Communication 290, Media Literacy, Smith
  • Communication 328, Intercultural Communication, Broz
  • Communication 329, Nonverbal Communication, Broz
  • Economics 220, Economics of Developing Areas, Frost
  • Economics 240, American Economic History
  • Economics 275, Economies in Transition
  • Economics 290, Economies of China, Frost
  • Education 103, Sociological Perspectives in Education, Yontz
  • Education 150, Phonics for Reading & Writing, Calabrese
  • Education 150, Phonics for Reading & Writing, Linder
  • English 180, Film noir, Hinson
  • English 290, American Literary Traditions, Askeland
  • English 290, American Gothic, Hinson
  • English 180, “By Any Means Necessary”: Radical Politics and African American Literature, Askeland
  • English 180, Social Justice – Gay and Lesbian Literature, Incorvati
  • English 180, Sense of Wonder, Science Fiction Literature, McClelland
  • Honors 300, Orphans and Adoption in History and Literature, Askeland
  • English 308, Study of Romantic Literature, Incorvati
  • English 318, Bad Girls, Richards
  • English 380, Mobility in American Autobiography, Askeland
  • Geography 120, Human Ecology, Scholl
  • Geography 250, China’s Geography, Lenz
  • Geology 111, Earthquakes and Volcanoes, Bladh
  • History 106, Modern World, Wood 
  • History 111, Medieval Civilization, Livingstone
  • History 203, Fact and Fiction in The DaVinci Code, Livingstone
  • History 227, U.S. since 1945, Wood
  • History 240, The Crusades, Livingstone
  • History 251, Russia to 1796, Raffensperger
  • Marine Science 200, Oceanography, Welch
  • Mathematics 210, Fundamentals of Analysis, Parker
  • Mathematics 215, Differential Equations, Parker
  • Philosophy 200, Race, Gender, Science and Medicine, McHugh
  • Philosophy 204, Philosophy of Women’s Lives, McHugh
  • Philosophy 304, Knowing Bodies, McHugh
  • Philosophy 311, Modern Philosophy, McHugh
  • Physics 102B, Physics Through Experimentation , George
  • Physics 107, Astronomy, Fleisch
  • Physics 220, Modern Physics, George
  • Physics 360/ 460, Junior & Senior Seminar, George 
  • Political Science 205, Chinese Politics, Yu
  • Political Science 210, East Asian Politics, Yu
  • Political Science 224, American Presidency, Hasecke
  • Political Science 259, International Political Economy, Allan
  • Political Science 305, European Politics, Allan
  • Political Science 350, American Foreign Policy, Yu
  • Political Science 354, Chinese Foreign Policy, Yu
  • Psychology 150, Proseminar V—Abnormal, Little
  • Psychology 251, Abnormal Psychology, Little
  • Psychology 280, Psychology and Culture, Crane
  • Psychology 280, Child Abnormal Psychology, Little
  • Psychology 400, Research Abnormal
  • Religion 134, Chinese and Japanese Religious Traditions, Oldstone-Moore
  • Religion 177, Religious Perspectives on Contemporary Moral Issues,  Nelson
  • Religion 200, Pilgrimage, Oldstone-Moore
  • Religion 241, Christian Tradition, Nelson
  • Religion 336, Religious Daoism and Chinese Popular Religion
  • Religion 339, Monkeys, Samurai, and Gods, Oldstone-Moore
  • Honors 300, Bioethics, Nelson
  • Sociology 277, Islam and Islamic Societies, Pankhurst
  • Sociology 340, Sociology of Religion, Pankhurst
  • Sociology 390, Russian and Central Eurasian Societies and Cultures, Pankhurst

 

Chinese 111/01:  Beginning Chinese I
(5 semester hours)
S. Chan

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Chinese is a fascinating language.  It does not have Western style grammatical features such as tense, gender, number, agreement, etc.  Instead, grammatical values are defined by markers and position, with the result that where elements are in sentences determines meaning.  Chinese has a relatively simple phonetic structure and uses tones (voice pitches) to differentiate between words. The character writing system operates on the basis of representing concepts and sounds in a way that is fundamentally different from English alphabetic writing.  These differences make Chinese an entrancing language and a window on a very different way of talking and thinking about the world.  This year we will continue to use a textbook that concentrates on communicating in Chinese.  Mastering the dialogues and conversations it contains will give you the ability to interact with Chinese people on topics from everyday life.  We will also begin our study of the specifics of the Chinese writing system, and over the semester you will learn to read and write 250 characters and compounds.

 

Chinese 151A/C/01 & 02:  Film and Fiction in Modern China
(4 semester hours)
S. Chan

Prerequisite:  No prerequisites.  Taught in English
We will watch and discuss representative films from the major waves of movie making in China, and we will read representative fiction from the four main literary periods in 20th century China; in some cases, the readings will be the original stories used to make the movies.  We will focus on both the aesthetics of the short stories and movies as well as the cultural values they express.  All readings, discussions, and lectures will be in English, and the films will have English subtitles.  The Chinese have written magnificent stories and made great films so it will be an interesting and entertaining course.  The course can be used to meet either the “A” or “C” General Education requirements.

 

Chinese 211/01:  Intermediate Chinese I
(5 semester hours)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Chinese 112 or placement.
We will focus on continuing to build both your reading and speaking abilities in modern Chinese.  There will be an emphasis on reviewing the grammar we previously studied and mastering additional structures.  We will, of course, be learning new vocabulary and developing greater skill with the writing system of the language.  There will be many different activities aiming at improving your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 

Chinese 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Chinese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Honors 300A/C/1W:  Nanking Massacre:  Film and Fiction
(4 semester hours)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Permission of the Honors Program & signature of the program administrative assistant required.
This is an Honors seminar designed to enhance intellectual experience for University Honors students through a specified theme and prepare them for writing an Honors Thesis in their major area of study. To understand the recent regional tensions in East Asia that have impacted on the global politics, economy and culture, the theme of this course is the Nanking Massacre during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) of WWII. An in-depth study of film and fiction about the Nanking Massacre will enhance aesthetic experience by different approaches to appreciate and interpret the cinematic and literary arts.  Writing intensive.

 

Chinese 311:  Directed Readings in Chinese Newspapers
(4 semester hours)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Chinese 212
This is a third year course in advanced Chinese.  It aims at developing competence in the language with an emphasis on strategies and tactics of reading Chinese newspapers to enable students to acquaint themselves with recent developments in China.  To accommodate the rapid changes in Chinese life and language today, we will supplement each lesson of the textbook with authentic news articles from the Internet.  Students should expect a steady expansion of their vocabulary and speak the language in all classroom activities.

 

Chinese 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
H. Choy

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Chinese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Chinese 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

 

Chinese 490:  Independent Study
Tutorials for the student who has excelled in previous study of Chinese. Thematic content chosen according to student's intellectual interests.  Conducted in spoken putonghua.

 

French 111:  Beginning French I
(5 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Open to the beginner, except by permission or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Emphasis on elementary grammar, vocabulary building, reading, writing, speaking, listening comprehension, and francophone cultures.  Open only to beginners except by permission.  Ninety minutes attendance required weekly in the Foreign Language Learning Center.

 

French 112F/01:  Beginning French II
(5 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite:  French 111 or placement.   Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of French 111.  Emphasis on elementary grammar, vocabulary building, reading, writing, speaking, listening comprehension, and francophone cultures.  Ninety minutes attendance required weekly in the Foreign Language Learning Center.  This course satisfies the university’s general education requirement for Foreign Language.

 

French 260A/1.1:  La Vie contemporaine des francophones (Contemporary Francophone Culture)
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
Consideration of topics in contemporary life in francophone cultures with a focus on conversation, including study of practical vocabulary of daily life, and grammar review.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the university’s general education requirement for Foreign Language and contributes two credits towards the requirement for the Performing, Fine, and Literary Arts.

 

French 265H/1.2:  Qui sont les Québécois?  L’Identité nationale  (Who are the Québécois?  National Identity)  
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
An introduction to Québécois history and culture.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the university’s general education requirement for Foreign Language and contributes two credits towards the requirement for History.

 

French 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level French course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

French 305A/1W:  Traduction et stylistique
(4 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite:  Four semester hours in French at the 200 level or permission of instructor
This course focuses mainly on literary translation as a mechanism for examining principles of grammar and style in French and English.  Writing intensive. 

 

French 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level French course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

French 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

French 490:  Independent Study

 

French 491:  Internship

 

German 111/01:  Beginning German I     
(5 semester hours)
D. Barry

Open to only the beginner, except by permission of instructor.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, oral practice, and laboratory work.  Also a basic introduction to
German culture.

 

German 111/02:  Beginning German I     
(5 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Open to only the beginner, except by permission of instructor.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, oral practice, and laboratory work.  Also, a basic introduction to German culture.

 

German 112F/01:  Beginning German II  
(5 semester hours)
D. Barry

Prerequisite:  German 111 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Explication of grammar, continued oral practice, reading of literary and/or cultural texts and related explication of grammar and laboratory work. 

 

German 261/1.2:  Umwelt:  Natur und Kultur (Environment:  Nature and Culture)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
This is a content-based reading and conversation course that focuses on the role of the natural environment in the lives of contemporary Germans; it explores some of the distinctive ways in which those Germans express their regard and concern for the natural world.

 

German 262/1.1:  Eomführung in die Kunst des Ãœbersetzens (Introduction to the Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
An introduction to the theory and practice of good translation, including a consideration of the demands of translating different types of texts and a consideration of the broader cultural issues inherent in the practice of translation.  Review of advanced grammar topics as well.

 

German 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level German course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

German 365/1W:  Bunte Republik Deutschland
(4 semester hours)
D. Barry

Prerequisite:  8 semester hours of German at the 200-level
This course examines a number of literary, socio-historical and film texts to trace the evolution of Germany as a land of immigration, from the mid-1950s into the new century.  It also provides a measure of the contributions by ethnic and linguistic minorities to the contemporary German cultural scene.  Writing intensive.

 

 

German 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level German course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

German 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

German 490:  Independent Study
German 491:  Internship

 

Japanese 111:  Beginning Japanese I
(5 semester hours)
T. Imai

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Introduces the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives. 

 

Japanese 112F:  Beginning Japanese II
(5 semester hours)
T. Imai

Prerequisite:  Japanese 111 with a C- or higher or placement.
Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 

Japanese 230:  Topics:  Advanced Instruction in Japanese
(4 semester hours)
T. Imai

Prerequisite:  Japanese 211 with a C- or higher or placement
This course offers continuing instruction in Japanese for students who have completed Japanese 211 or above. Instruction will be tailored to the needs of students who have three or more semesters of Japanese.  Students who would otherwise register for Japanese 212, 311, or 312 should enroll in this class. 

 

Japanese 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Imai

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Japanese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Japanese 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Imai

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Japanese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Japanese 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

 

Japanese 490:  Independent Study

 

Russian 111:  Beginning Russian I
(5 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Afraid of the Russian alphabet?  Believe it or not, you already know almost half of it if you know Latin (our) alphabet and a little Greek from being a member of a sorority or a fraternity!  After just five days you will be able to read many words that are borrowed from other languages!  We use the computer to help us, too!  Recent world economic events have convinced us that Russia is indeed an important player in the international economic arena.  Don’t be left behind!  This course also will teach you how to speak and write Russian while learning the structure of the language.  In addition, the text for the course is accompanied by an extensive online workbook with many types of exercises to help you succeed.

 

Russian 151A/C:  Journey Into the Fantastic
(4 semester hours)
Zaharkov, Lila

Taught in English, no prerequisites.  This class is for first-year students only.  One one-hour additional advising meeting per week required.
Join us in this course as each hero/ine takes a journey into a fantastic world!  While it may be as “normal” as a hero/ine in a fairy tale on a quest, it might be as fantastic as a journey into the future 600 years from now or maybe to another planet!  While journeying into the world of the fantastic, readers will be introduced to the best writers of 19th and 20th century Russian literature who use this medium just for fun, or maybe to discover other truths!  No Russian is required!  All readings, lectures, and discussion in English.  Fulfills either the “A” Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or “C” Non-Western Cultures General Education requirement. Structured for first-year students, there is a mandatory one-hour advising meeting on Tuesdays from 12:00-1:00 p.m. in addition to the regularly scheduled class meetings.

 

Russian 260F/1.2:  Understanding Contemporary Russian Social Issues
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Introduction to reading skills in Russian by using authentic materials from the contemporary Russian press found on the World Wide Web.  Discussion of social and cultural issues in today’s Russian society.   

 

Russian 263F/1.1:  Russian Film and Culture
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Through the study of Russian, students will watch and discuss films that acquaint students with contemporary Russian life.  Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to discuss the portrayals of family, relationships, changing value systems, and social questions as reflected in Russian film.  This course will also help students gain additional language skills in speaking and aural comprehension and includes a thorough review of the case system.

 

Russian 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
L.  Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Russian course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Russian 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
L.  Zaharkov

Prerequisite:  RUSS 270 and permission of instructor

 

Russian 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

 

Russian 490:  Independent Study

 

Spanish 101/1.1:  Spanish for High Beginners
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Students will have a 101 placement, or permission of Spanish faculty.
Designed for students who have had two years or less of previous instruction in Spanish but who are not yet ready to enter a 112 class.  Course will review essential structures needed to prepare students for 112 classes, focusing upon the communicative structures of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

 

Spanish 111: Beginning Spanish I
(5 semester hours)
A. Kline

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Emphasis on elementary grammar, and oral practice.

 

Spanish 112F/01/: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.

 

Spanish 112F/02/: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
M. Rodriguez-Garcia

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.   

 

Spanish 112F/03: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
V. Garcia

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.

 

Spanish 112F/04/: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
M. Rodriguez-Garcia

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading. 

 

Spanish 150F/01: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.  This class is for first-year students only.  One one-hour additional advising meeting per week required.
This course is designed to offer students at the intermediate level an opportunity to acquire communicative skills, improve their formal knowledge of the language, and develop an awareness and appreciation of Hispanic cultures.  Structured for first-year students, there is a mandatory one-hour advising meeting on Tuesdays from 12:00-1:00 p.m. in addition to the regularly scheduled class meetings.

 

Spanish 150F/02: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
V. Garcia

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112 or placement.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
This is an intermediate level course that will review, introduce, and expand upon vocabulary and structures commonly dealt with in introductory courses.  It includes a Service Learning optional component.  The Service Learning option provides a hands-on learning experience through real life exchanges with native Spanish speakers.

 

Spanish 260F/1.1:  El mundo contemporáneo (Contemporary Issues of the Hispanic World)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course focuses on contemporary issues of the Hispanic world including topics such as immigration, politics, pop culture, economics, demography, religion, social class, and globalization.  The course will help students develop conversational skills and strategies.

 

Spanish 261F/1.1:  El mundo físico (The Physical World)
(2 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course serves as an introduction to the Hispanic world by highlighting the diverse nature and cultures of Spanish-speaking people focusing on speech patterns, climate, geography and environmental issues.  The course will also develop language skills that will enhance students’ ability to express themselves in Spanish.

 

Spanish 262F/1.2:  Entre dos mundos:  el arte de la traducción (Between Two Worlds:  The Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, 150, or 200 level placement
This intermediate course will introduce students to the theory (theories) and practices of translation.  Through translation practice from Spanish to English, and English to Spanish, students will focus on nuance, style and context of language/text.  Students will read selected essays on translation, read selected texts in dual language versions, and create their own translations of short texts.

 

Spanish 263F/1.2:  El cine y el cambio social (Film and Social Change)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, 150 or 200 level placement
This course introduces students to film from Spain and Latin America that intersect with social and historical transitions.  Students will explore the cultural context of each film, analyze major themes, and discuss the role of film as a reflection of and catalyst for social change.  The course will focus on aiding students in developing language skills for description and reporting.  Along with the practice/development of their language skills, students will learn basic principles of cinematic analysis and language.

 

Spanish 264F/1.1W:  Voces del pasado (Voices of the Past)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite:  Four semester hours of 200 level courses in Spanish
This course gives students an opportunity to gain an understanding of the Spanish-speaking world by examining its rich cultural heritage.  Through reading and writing activities, student learners will explore the complexity of the Hispanic world and how historical events have influenced human conduct.  The course will help students develop language skills for description and narration in the past.  Writing intensive.

 

Spanish 265F/1.2W:  La diversidad en el mundo hispano (Diversity in the Spanish-speaking World)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite:  Four semester hours of 200 level courses in Spanish
This intermediate course will provide students the opportunity to explore human diversity in the Spanish-speaking world, in both historical and contemporary contexts.  Through reading, viewing and writing activities students will gain an understanding of the complexities of identity, ethnicity and multiculturalism across the Hispanic world, including the United States.  The course will aid students in developing language skills to express and support opinion.  Writing intensive.

Spanish 270:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Spanish course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

Spanish 302A/1W:  Introduction to Hispanic Literature II
(4 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Eight semester hours at the 200 level including Spanish 264 and 265
Continuation of Spanish 301, provides the student with a survey of 19th and 20th centuries.  Significant figures and literary currents of the Hispanic world are presented.  Writing intensive. 

 

Spanish 370:  CLAC Module.  See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Spanish course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level 

 

Spanish 380:  Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Completion of two 200-level courses in the target language.  Field experience is included.
Course is to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language learning and classroom practice.  The student learns to plan, implement and evaluate language instruction for students at the elementary and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures.  Field experience is included. 

 

Spanish 415/1W:  Advanced Studies in Spanish Language
(4 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite:  Eight semester hours of Spanish at the 200-level and a 300-level course taught in Spanish
It is especially recommended for students who seek advanced work in grammar, with the goal of producing idiomatic Spanish.  Students will acquire an understanding of more sophisticated grammar structures and their interrelations.  Writing intensive. 

 

Spanish 494:  Methodology of Early Childhood Spanish Language Education
(2 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite:  Eight semester hours of Spanish at the 200-level including Spanish 264 and 265
This course is designed to give students seeking the P-12 licensure in Spanish experience in foreign language teaching at the elementary school level.  The course requires a six-week field experience of observation and supervised teaching of Spanish in one of the local elementary schools. 

 

Spanish 490:  Independent Study

 

Spanish 491:  Internship

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