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Russian and Central Eurasian Studies - Fall 2014

RUSS 111 01                                     Beginning Russian I
5 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Pre-requisites:  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Afraid of the Russian alphabet? Believe it or not, you already know almost half of it if you know Latin (our) alphabet and a little Greek from being a member of a sorority or a fraternity! After just five days you will be able to read many words that are borrowed from other languages! We use the computer to help us, too! Recent world economic events have convinced us that Russia is indeed an important player in the international economic arena. Don't be left behind! This course also will teach you how to speak and write Russian while learning the structure of the language. In addition, the text for the course is accompanied by an extensive online workbook with many types of exercises to help you succeed.

GEOG 250C/S 1W 2W                     Russian and Central Eurasian Geography
4 Credits
Medvedkov, Olga

Pre-requisites: None
For the first time in all Russian history geography speaks for itself. After the disintegration of the Soviet Empire regions became exceedingly important in this highly centralized state. The current government is trying to reestablish control over the regions. Who will win in this geo-political game? Will Russia become a democratic state or it will pull back to the dictatorship? Will newly independent states like Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan gravitate to Russian economic and political domain or create new alliances with other bordering countries?
We will discuss it throughout the course. The class will be focused on changing space economy, environmental and population issues, national identity problems, political orientation in different regions of the post-Soviet space. This course has a lecture-discussion-project format. Students are expected to complete several map assignments, participate in class discussions, and to write a final paper on major topics.

HIST 253 C/H 1W                             Soviet Russia
4 Credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Pre-requisites:  None
Russia in this period is fully enmeshed in European and world history. Over the course of this class we will see Soviet troops in Berlin, as well Soviet activity throughout the world.  Russia also goes through a series of dramatic changes in this period from the amazing events of two revolutions in 1917 to the conservative reaction under Stalin, and repetitions of those cycles of reform and reaction throughout the twentieth century. The history of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics will change the history of the rest of the world, and as such, is a vital component in understanding not only the events of the twentieth century, but our twenty-first century as well.
Writing Intensive

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German.

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

RUSS 260F 1.2                                  Understanding Contemporary Russian Social Issues
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Introduction to reading skills in Russian by using authentic materials from the contemporary Russian press found on the World Wide Web. Discussion of social and cultural issues in today's Russian society.

RUSS 263F 1.1                                  Russian Film and Culture
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Through the study of Russian, students will watch and discuss films that acquaint students with contemporary Russian life. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to discuss the portrayals of family, relationships, changing value systems, and social questions as reflected in Russian film. This course will also help students gain additional language skills in speaking and aural comprehension and includes a thorough review of the case system.

 

POLI 309 1W                                     Eurasian Nomads in Ancient and Medieval World
Raffensperger, Chris
4 Credits

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
Eurasian nomads are part of a variety of histories and historiographies in China, Russia, India, the Middle East, and Europe. But in every one of those cases they primarily exist as an “other,” the “outsider” who raids the settled empire, the “barbarian” who ravages civilization. This class will attempt to change that perspective and focus on the nomads themselves as the actors. Over the course of the semester the class will acquire an understanding of nomadic society and traditions, as well as the various cultures involved in the regions and periods under consideration. They will do in-depth research on one particular steppe culture or people and present that material to the class, with the goal of helping to understand who these Eurasian nomad are, why they acted the way they did, and why history and historians traditionally portray them negatively.   Writing intensive. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

RUSS 317 1.1                                                National Identity
2 Credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite:  Russian 262, 264, or 316
With a focus on the New Russia as a result of the fall of the Soviet Union, this course examines some of the major cultural responses to the social and political changes in Post-Soviet life.  It explores issues of how Russians define themselves as an individual as a result of the loss of the collective in Post-Soviet society.  Taught in Russian.

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