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School of Community Education - Fall 2014

The Evening schedule also includes courses offered in conjunction with academic departments.

Courses with the SCED designation are offered with the approval of the Wittenberg faculty through SCE.  They appear in the Evening and Weekend schedule exclusively.  Although designed primarily for adult students in the Organizational Leadership and Certificate programs, most of them are also open to other adult and traditional students who meet stated prerequisites.  Where appropriate, the Dean of SCE allocates a fixed number of places for traditional students in these and other SCE-sponsored courses, and enrollment in these places is through the regular registration procedure.  In cases where the allocation has been filled, traditional students need the Dean’s signature on a Course Change (ADD) form in order to register.  Adult students enroll through the regular SCE procedure.

 

BIOL 131B                 Woody Plants of the Natural & Urban Environments
4 credits
de Langlade, Ron

Prerequisite: None
Course Goals: This course will focus on the urban and natural environments as related to woody trees and shrubs and vines.  The prime goal of the course is to give the student the necessary framework to understand and be acquainted with the woody plant world around them.  Course Subject: The course is to acquaint the student of the various native and cultivated forms of woody trees, shrubs, and vines as found in natural and urban environments.  Topics to be covered include: basic classification, naming, use of taxonomic keys, life histories, basic growth patterns, culture and care.  Field trips to various local sites will be taken.  See also BIOL 230.

 

BIOL 230                   Woody Plants
4 credits
de Langlade, Ron

Prerequisite: For majors only
See also BIOL 131B.  For activities specific to 230 students, contact the professor.

 

COMP 121Q             Computing in the Arts & Sciences
4 credits
Herzog, John

Prerequisite:  Math Placement Level 22 or higher
This introductory course is intended for non-majors, and assumes little computer experience beyond using work processing software.  COMP 121 is designed to help students become familiar with microcomputers and their use in problem-solving and their impact on society.  Students will create spreadsheets, databases, and will also learn a subset of an object-oriented programming language to create animations.

The final grade will be based on labs, homework, and exams.  Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

 

CRCJ 214S                Penology & Social Control
4 credits
Wagner, Brooke

Prerequisite:  One course in SOCI (min. of 3 hrs.)
Penology is the study of the use of social institutions to control unwanted behavior, often through prisons, internment camps and concentration camps.  This course will examine topics related to penology, social control, and the use of imprisonment in modern societies.  In the first half of the course, the role of prisons and other punishments are reviewed in historical context, while the remainder of the material will pertain to issues in modern corrections.  Inmate prison population growth, incapacitation, recidivism, rehabilitation, and prison program evaluation will be prevalent topics, as well as trends in sentencing, alternative sanctions, prison violence, and inmate subculture.  At the end of the semester, students will have a better understanding of the dyadic relationship between human behavior and social institutions.  This course will also help students better understand the impact of social institutions and the diversity of human experience, as we critically examine the dysfunctions within American corrections and explore how intersections of race, gender, and social class shape the human experience within this total institution.  The course uses the @witt@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive work.

 

NURS 403      Research and Evidence-Based Practice
4 credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Permission required
Introduces the basic elements of the research process and evidence-based practice.  Emphasizes the critical appraisal of current evidence that guides professional nursing practice.  @witt@home format

 

PHIL 209A                 Philosophy of Hip Hop Culture
4 credits
Bailey, Julius

Prerequisite:  None
This course will look at the content and forms of Hip Hop Expression as well as the assessment of performance, lyrics and images placed upon, and embodied by, its audience.  This course will be taught thematically, focusing particularly to the fundamental human questions such as: The search for God, love and knowledge; the historical concerns of cultural authenticity, race and sexuality; language as artistic expression and meaning; Chiefly we are looking at Hip Hop as a Cultural Socratic Art-Form, namely the historic look at Hip-Hop’s ability to question, inform and engage in the search for purpose within a democracy through its drama, music, and cultural forms.  The course uses the @witt@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive work.

 

RELI 100R                  Religion and Politics in the U.S.
4 credits
Copeland, Warren

Prerequisite:  None
Do religion and politics mix?  If so, with what ingredients and recipe?  In this course students will read and discuss three books that provide very different interpretations of the proper relationship between religion and politics in the United States.  At the end of the course, students will write a paper using those three alternatives to place themselves in relation to this issue.  This will allow students to consider the central religious question of how faith and public life should be related.  This course uses the @witt@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive work.  Assignments will include: a Moodle entry for one chapter of each book, Moodle replies to the entries of other students, and a final paper. 

 

RUSS 105                  Russian for Professionals
4 credits
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite:  None
First course of a two-course sequence (with RUSS 106F) enabling adults to achieve language competency goals within the context of their professional and personal interests.  This sequence introduces Russia’s language and culture.  The course meets once a week, using the most up-to-date methodology, including video, multimedia language lab, and web-accessed exercises that allow students to work at their own pace.  The textbook is accompanied by an instructor-developed manual that enables students to work on assignments between class meetings.  Completion of the follow up RUSS 106F with a grade of C- or higher satisfies the Wittenberg Foreign Language Competency requirement.

 

SCED 200L    Liberal Studies Colloquium: American Democracy: Problems & Prospects
4 credits
Baker, Rob

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
The foundation of the adult degree program and an intellectual orientation to Wittenberg for adults—but also open to traditional students, particularly transfers seeking to meet the Integrated Learning (L-course) requirement. The Colloquium—Latin for “speaking together”—introduces students to a mature level of critical thinking, research processes, and both written and oral expression. In this semester’s version, we’ll pursue this development through the study of the topic American Democracy: Problems and Prospects.

While the rest of the world looks to America as a model of democracy, we ourselves experience a growing sense of unease about our system and disconnection from its founding ideas and aspirations.  Some thinkers even conclude that the pressures and challenges confronting us in recent times threaten the vitality or even the continuation of the system.  To gain a clearer understanding of this situation, we will study some essentials of democratic theory.  We will use this base to examine key challenges that have presented themselves in our time—shifts in the separation of powers, radical individualism, decreasing citizen participation, and trivialized election campaigns.  We will use the criteria of democratic theory to assess these challenges, with the goal of arriving at an intelligent understanding of our evolving system and perhaps some ideas for improving it.  The course uses the @witt@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive work.

 

SCED 260S               Organizational Behavior
4 credits
Staff

Prerequisite:  one S-course
We will examine the behavior of people in formal organizations, with work organizations being the principle object.  In our examination, we will consider individual behavior and motivation; we will explore the relationships between individuals—communication, team and other group dynamics, leadership, influence, power; and we will study key organizational characteristics—structure, culture, and adaptation to environmental changes (especially the balancing of stability and change).  The emphasis will be on using applicable theories to analyze and improve individual, team, and organizational performance.  @witt@home format

 

SCED 300-1.1            Issues: Team Leadership
2 credits
Neal, Dan

Prerequisite:  Soph. standing or permission
A comprehensive and practice-oriented study of team development concepts and principles, including virtual teams.  A team project will form the core of the learning experience.  Students will consider the advantages and disadvantages of team-based structures, current thinking concerning team development techniques, and methods for evaluating team effectiveness.  This course uses the @witt/@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive activities.

 

SCED 300-1.2            Issues: Employment Law
2 credits
Wahl, Shannon

Prerequisite:  Soph. standing or permission
This course provides an introduction to the laws and regulations that govern employee rights and the management of an organization’s workforce.  Recognizing that all levels of management play a critical role in maintaining a company’s legal compliance obligations, this course will focus on the employment law topics that every manager/leader should be familiar with, including: hiring and selection; wage/hour and pay issues; managing employee attendance; maintaining discipline/termination; workplace harassment and discrimination, the impact of labor unions; and other relevant topics.  In addition, the student will become familiar with the administrative agencies and processes that govern and/or adjudicate the various employment laws and regulations.  The course uses the @witt@home format and will combine limited classroom meetings with interactive online learning and writing projects. 

 

SCED 340                  Readings in Leadership
4 credits
Egloff, Mark

Prerequisite:  Jr. standing or permission
We will read from a selected “top ten” of classic authors on leadership, including Plato, Machiavelli, Drucker, Deming, and Peters.  We will elicit from these some of the principal theories of leadership, particularly those relating to business organizations, and the effects of historical and economic contexts in shaping them.  The course objective is a historically grounded understanding of the ways organizations develop and the manner in which leaders operate within them.  Course projects are designed to develop a mature set of insights into one’s work organization or other organizations in one’s experience.  The course uses the @witt@home format, combining limited classroom meetings and web-supported interactive learning.

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