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Communications - Spring 2014

COMM 190  Public Speaking
4 credits
Coleman, Michelle

Prerequisite: None
This course addresses basic theoretical principles of effective public speaking necessary for pluralistic audiences, concentrating on content, organization, audience analysis, ethics, language, and delivery. Students apply these principles to several oral presentations, some videotaped and requiring the use of PowerPoint.

 

COMM 200 Introduction to Communication Studies  
4 credits

Waggoner, Catherine

Pre-requisite: ENGL 101
This course provides an introduction to the field of human communication studies and a foundation for future study within the communication discipline. The course introduces the core concepts, essential skills, and perennial issues found in several relevant contexts of human interaction, including interpersonal relationships, organizations, and cross-cultural interaction. It also examines these contexts from a theoretical perspective, suggesting how scholars have sought to formulate generalized explanations for the processes of human meaning making. Students will demonstrate their learning through written assignments, exams, and presentations. Writing intensive.

 

COMM 270S Interpersonal Communication
4 credits
Coleman, Michelle

Pre-requisite:  None
This course offers an introduction to message production and interpretation in face-to-face and other interpersonal settings.  The focus of the course is to illustrate how choices in interpersonal communication behaviors are basic to our character as human beings and the nature of our interpersonal relationships.  Students will complete the course having learned about basic interpersonal communication principles related to, for example, self-presentation, self-disclosure, gender, culture, effective listening, relationship development, relational maintenance, relationship dissolution, power, compliance gaining, emotion, and conflict management.     

 

COMM 290S Media Literacy
4 credits

Cunningham, Sheryl

Pre-requisite: ENGL 101E
This course provides a broad foundation for examining the form, content, and consequences of mediated communication (including the Internet, recording, radio, television, cable, film, newspaper, and other publishing industries). The course introduces media industries from both an historical and contemporary perspective, covers the prominent theories that characterize mass media functions and effects, and addresses controversial issues in mediated communication. Students are introduced to intellectual tools that will enable them to be more critical consumers of media and given opportunities to practice applying those tools in structured classroom discussions, writing assignments, and presentations.

 

COMM 300Z Social Scientific Methods
4 credits
Broz, Stefne

Prerequisites: COMM 200; COMM 270S, 280 or 290S; Math Placement score 22
This course introduces students to the process of conducting quantitative communication research, including how to 1) formulate a research question, 2) conduct library research for a literature review, 3) select a method (e.g., participant/observation, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, experiment, content analysis, or survey research), 4) adhere to standards for scholarly writing, and 5) critically evaluate others’ research studies.  Writing intensive.  Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

 

COMM 301  Critical Methods:  Television Criticism
4 credits
Smith, Matthew

Pre-requisite:  COMM 200 and COMM 280 or  290S.
This course studies television as a form of intentional message making and encourages students to develop an active, critical response to the television they consume and to examine the effects it has on the world around them. The course explores the production of television as texts and considers multiple approaches that scholars have used to analyze the form and products of this medium. Students can gain a vocabulary for the production of these texts and learn to develop planned, in-depth critiques of their messages. Writing intensive.

 

COMM 329  Nonverbal Communication
4 hours
Broz, S.

Prerequisites: COMM 200 and 270S, 280, or 290S; or permission of instructor.
This advanced seminar is designed to provide a comprehensive study of nonverbal communication.  Students learn the major types of nonverbal communication in the context of theory and methods of observation, as well as the ways in which nonverbal messages interact with verbal messages, and how nonverbal communication functions in the total communication process. Lectures will provide an informational basis for students’ investigation of nonverbal concepts and research-related observations, while discussions and activities provide the opportunity for students to learn more about nonverbal communication from each other.

 

COMM 350 Topic:  Feminist Theory on Film and TV
4 Credits
Cunningham, Sheryl

Prerequisites:  COMM 200, CINE 200, WMST100 or COMM 290 or permission of instructor.
This advanced course begins with a brief overview of basic terms from film studies (mise en scene, camera shots, diegesis, etc.) as well as a review of feminist movements, particularly 2nd wave feminism and its link to the development of film criticism in the 1970s and early 80s. The main focus of the course will be reading feminist theory and utilizing concepts and ideas developed by theorists to analyze contemporary films and television. We will focus most of our analysis on films and television series that are gendered in their targeting of either men or women as audiences. Students will demonstrate their learning through written assignments, exams, and presentations. 

 

COMM 361 Gender and Communication
4 credits
Waggoner, Catherine

Prerequisites: COMM 200 and 270S, 280, or 290S; or permission of instructor.
This course considers public understandings of gender and sexuality in America and the way in which they are represented in popular discourse. In particular, the focus is on cases of “gender trouble” or gender ambiguity, in which dominant cultural assumptions of gender and sexuality are challenged (e.g., drag performances, female masculinity, metrosexuality). Our goal is to discover how those challenges to gender norms are rhetorically configured, and if/how they are disciplined or realigned in the support of dominant gender norms, or if/how they constitute acts of resistance to such norms.  Experience in rhetorical criticism (i.e., COMM 301) is preferred, but not required. While the course is not writing intensive in that there will not be instruction in writing per se, there is an assumption that students are skilled in writing analyses. Assignments include exams, discussion leadership, and a final project. 

 

COMM 403 Communication Senior Seminar
4 credits
Smith, Matthew and Waggoner, Catherine

Pre-requisites: COMM 200, COMM 300, COMM 301 and senior status   
This course is the capstone experience in the Communication program. Through their work on independent and group projects, students will practice research, writing, and critical thinking skills that are part of the process of conducting communication research, culminating in both written and oral presentations of results.

 

COMM 495  01 Practicum:  C.A.B.L.E.
2 credits
Smith, Matthew

Prerequisites:  BY PERMISSION ONLY

 

COMM 495 02 Practicum:  Integrated Media Corps  (IMC)    
2 credits
Smith, Matthew

Prerequisites:  BY PERMISSION ONLY

 

COMM 499 Senior Honors Thesis/Project
0-4 credits
Staff

Prerequisites: 

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