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East Asian Studies - Spring 2014

BUSN 290 01 Global Leadership & Social Entrepreneurship in East Asia
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

No prerequisites
With the traditional lines between for-profit enterprise, nonprofit enterprise, and government beginning to blur, it is critical that students understand this emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of social entrepreneurship. This class highlights how social enterprises and challenges in East Asia differ from that of Western European and American. Students will work on social venture business plan in this class and selected students will travel to East Asia to participate in a business plan competition during summer of 2013. 10/12

 

BUSN 290 02 Business & Management in East Asia
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

No prerequisites
Asia, ablaze with economic energy, is changing the shape of the world economy and the scope and nature of competition among the world's companies. Western firms face a world far different and more challenging than just a few years ago, thanks largely to the rise of new and
increasingly powerful competitors from Japan, Korea and now China. This course provides an introduction to the variety of ways in which business is conducted in East Asia. It also provides a foundation in cultural and political aspects of business in East Asia, which tend to be thoroughly intertwined in international business. 10/12

 

CHIN 112F 01 Beginning Chinese II
5 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisites:  Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111.  Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important.  We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required. 10/13

 

CHIN 212 01 Intermediate Chinese II
5 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite:  Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese.  Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions.  It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language.  Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required. 10/13

 

CHIN 312 Directed Readings of Chinese Literature
4 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
Intensive study of pieces representative of Republican and Communist style literature.  Focus primarily on modern fiction. 10/13

 

EAST 100C 01 Introduction to East Asia: Continuity and Change
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona

What is the basis of cultural unity in East Asia? This course takes a historical and contemporary approach to understanding East Asia as a region that shares particular cultural connections. Focusing on the nations of China, Korea and Japan, the course will examine the significant religious, historical and political ties in this region. Particular topics examined include the family and the role of the individual in society, both past and present. We will look at overarching social institutions in place as well as individual life experiences in both rural and urban contexts. East Asian Studies 100 is an introductory level course that assumes no prior knowledge and provides a foundation for understanding questions of continuity and change in this part of the world. 10/13

 

ECON 220C 01 Economics of Developing Areas
4 credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisites: ECON 190S
This course is concerned with the post World War II experiences and future prospects of the developing nations of Africa, Asia, Latin America and transition Eurasia. Topics include measures of development, alternative strategies for development, demography, human capital and labor, agriculture and finance. Lecture/discussion format. 10/13 

 

ECON 260C 01 East Asian Economies
4 credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisites: ECON 190
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important and pressing current issues facing the Northeastern Asian economies of China, Mongolia and North Korea; to new economic concepts, theories and models; and to many sub-fields of the discipline, including economic history, environmental economics, political economy, comparative economics, institutional economics and economies in transition.  It is also multidisciplinary, integrating economics with political science, geography, geology, sociology, environmental science, history, and business. 10/13
NOTE:  Cross-listed with East Asian Studies and International Studies; CLAC option.

 

GEOG 250S/C 01 China’s Geography
4 credits
Lenz, Ralph

Prerequisite: None
Despite many parallels between China’s physical environment and that of the USA, there are some notable contrasts. With a geographic area extending from deserts of Central Asia to the Pacific Ocean, environmental diversity within the region is pronounced.  This regional course will examine environmental impacts on cultural and economic patterns. China offers a surprising amount of cultural diversity, and cultural and economic contrasts between the Han and various minority populations, a topic not covered in most East Asian Studies classes, will be emphasized.  As China undergoes a tremendous economic transition, huge disparities between the interior of the country and its coast have resulted. Demographic, agricultural, and urban patterns will be examined. Evaluation will be based on exams and quizzes, a project, and an oral presentation about one of China’s sub regions or minority groups. CLAC option available for this class. 10/13

 

HIST 162C Modern Asia
4 credits
Pfeifer, Justin

Prerequisite:  None 
Our course will examine modern East Asian history from 1600 to the present. The major emphasis will be on the histories of three countries: Korea, China, and Japan. East Asia from 1600 is a multi-cultural course which focuses on the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of these nations. The investigation of this modern period will allow us to explore key events in Asian history which ultimately affected the entire world. Among the topics to be examined are the rise and fall of the Qing dynasty in China, the Tokugawa bakufu in Japan, and the Choson dynasty in Korea. Following these periods, we will explore the path towards Communism in China; the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa periods of Japan; and the events contributing towards the division of Korea at the end of World War II. Evaluation for this course will be based on the following criteria: attendance, quizzes, primary source exercises, and book reviews. 10/13

 

JAPN 112F 01 Beginning Japanese II
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Japanese 111 or placement
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required. 10/13

 

JAPN 130C 01 Introduction to Japanese Culture and Society
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite:  Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
Is your knowledge of Japan limited to Pokemon and sushi?  (Did you even know Pokemon is from Japan?)  If you answered yes to the first question (and no to the second), this course is for you.  This course introduces students to different aspects of Japanese culture and society, such as religion, imperial system, art and aesthetic values, business culture, pop culture, and current social problems.  Taught in English.  Prerequisite:  None. 10/13

 

JAPN 212 01  Intermediate Japanese II
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite:  C- or above in Japanese 211 or placement.            
The course continues to introduce the fundamental Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will begin to utilize the language to establish contacts with people beyond the walls of Wittenberg, and increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required. 10/13

 

JAPN 312 01 Advanced Japanese II
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 311 or placement.
A continuation of Japanese 311, the goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills:  reading, writing, listening and speaking. 10/13

 

RELI 100 R/C 01 Topic: Intro to Buddhism
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Buddhism, one of the great world religions, has numerous manifestations through time and in a variety of cultures.  We will examine the Buddhist tradition beginning with its founder, Siddhartha Gautama.  From there we will explore key Buddhist teachings in the Theravada (South Asia) and Mahayana (Central and East Asia) traditions, including the Vajrayana (Tibetan) school.  In addition to Buddhist teachings, we’ll see how Buddhism is lived by its practitioners, using interviews, videos, and cultural artifacts, and through a meditation lab for students.  A significant amount of the course will look at contemporary manifestations of Buddhism, including recent growth outside of Asia in North America and Europe. 10/13

 

RELI 200R/C  01 Topic: Pilgrimage
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Studying pilgrimage—which is travel to a sacred place—is like touring key places and moments of the great religions of the world.  Pilgrimage is an ancient practice in which a person separates from familiar places, faces and routines to go on a quest to become physically, spiritually, and emotionally closer to the divine.  The experience of pilgrimage is described as “liminal” (an in-between state); this state allows for great personal transformation. The range of experiences and stories of pilgrimage ranges from reverently spiritual to the bawdy and wild.  In this class we will study major historically important pilgrimages that are still practiced today in Spain, Saudi Arabia, India, China, England, Japan and Korea. Materials will include accounts by pilgrims, videos, and the examination of the costumes and objects pilgrims carry with them (and take home), and the religious and historical significance of these journeys. 10/13

 

RELI 336C/R 01 Religious Daoism & Chinese Popular Religion
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Religious Daoism is a complex and interesting religious tradition that includes meditation, magic, sorcery, philosophical discourse, and the quest for immortality. Influential in Chinese imperial politics and history, as a resource for healing in communities, and a way of self-cultivation.  We will examine the tradition of Religious Daoism in historical development and in modern context, noting its persistence and reemerging popularity today.  We will also look at Chinese Popular Religion, the practices that have been the basis of the religion of the Chinese people that have sometimes been confused with Daoism, but which are themselves a rich and interesting collection of folk and popular traditions that have shaped Chinese culture.  Class will be a combination of lecture and discussion, with student presentations and a term paper. 10/13
Writing intensive

 

SOCI 201A/C Topics: Japanese Film
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona

Prerequisite:  None 
Films tell multiple stories.  In this course, we will explore those stories through the art and tradition of Japanese cinema. To do so, we will examine Japanese film along three dimensions. First, we will examine the pieces as individual works of art.  Japanese cinematographers began exploring the medium during the silent era of film.  We will follow the history of Japanese cinema through famous works that have received national and/or international acclaim.  Second, we will use the medium as a lens into Japanese culture.  Films are cultural texts that give insight into the culture in which they were produced.  We will learn about Japanese culture through the films we watch.  Finally, films say something about the nation in which they were produced and the individuals that produce them—they make claims about individual and national selves through idealized representations and social critique.  For this analysis, we will examine the films as commentary that the Japanese make about themselves. 10/13

 

THDN 013P 01 Tai Chi & Tai Chi Sword
1 credit
Li-Chang, Shih-Ming

 

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