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Education - Spring 2014

EDUC 103  Sociological Perspectives in Education                    
4 credits        
Yontz, Brian

No prerequisites
An examination of the foundations of education and teaching as conceived through a sociological perspective. The course develops theoretical and practical perspectives by considering different models for studying and analyzing social problems and by considering cases and disputes emerging from the daily practice of teaching. More specifically, the course considers the social and institutional roles of parents, teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders in public education. Issues of class, ethnicity, and gender will be examined as they afford legal and organizational power within the institutional structure. How institutions and individuals are responsive or resistant to change is examined as well as the pressing economic and social contexts which make change imperative. Reading in the course will revolve around specific sociological studies relating to the profession of teaching and to such social issues as school violence, social mobility, and equal opportunity. The course will have a field experience and clinical component in which students will be matched with teachers and students at a Springfield City School. Through these experiences, students will have the opportunity to gather data and write brief case studies regarding specific social practices and responses. Field experience of 10 hours is required. Students seeking licensure through the teacher education program are required to take either this course or Education 104.

 

EDUC 104  Philosophical Perspectives in Education      
4 credits
Broidy, Steve

No prerequisites
An examination of the foundations of education and teaching through a philosophical perspective. The course develops theoretical and practical perspectives through the close analysis of philosophical texts and by considering cases and disputes emerging from the daily practice of teaching. More specifically, the course examines fundamental questions concerning education as a moral practice. It is guided historically and philosophically by the writings of educational theorists. The writings of Plato, Rousseau, and Dewey will be consulted among others as well as fiction and nonfiction accounts that provide students a diverse and socially-specific context. The questions revolve around the ethical standards of the teaching professional and the legal and moral demands placed on practitioners as they consider the developmental needs of their students. The course provides an introduction to the politics of teaching, and practical approaches to moral education. The course has a field experience and clinical component in which students will be matched with teachers and students at a Springfield City Schools. Students will be required through these experiences to both determine moral and ethical issues and debate theoretical and practical approaches to solving them. Field experience of 10 hours is required in grades 6-8.   Students seeking licensure through the teacher education program are required to take either this course or Education 103.

 

EDUC 111  Human Development:  Birth through Middle Childhood  
2 credits        
Broidy, Steve

Concurrent registration in EDUC 120.
The course focuses upon the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and moral development of children from birth through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed upon the interactions of nature and social/cultural contexts that explain the wide range of diversity of students of this age level. Family constellations will be of particular focus. The course provides an examination of human development prior to age three to acquaint the student with knowledge about children prior to their entry into formal education and provides an examination of human development through middle childhood years so students acquire an appreciation for the full range of human development related to early and middle childhood. The course is designed for students seeking licensure in Early, Middle Childhood and Multi-Age fields. Field experience of five hours is required.

 

EDUC 112  Human Development and Learning Theory: Middle Childhood - Young Adult 
2 credits
Yontz, Brian

Concurrent registration in EDUC 120
The course focuses upon the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and moral development of children in middle childhood through early adolescence and young adulthood.   Emphasis is placed upon the interactions of nature and social and cultural contexts that explain the wide range of diversity of students at this age level. The course is designed for students seeking licensure in either Middle Childhood or Adolescence to Young Adult. Field experience of five hours is required.

 

EDUC 120  Introduction to Students with Special Needs                      
2 credits        
Brannan, Sally
McGuffey, Amy

Concurrent registration in EDUC 111 or EDUC 112
An examination of how schools and society respond to students who have special needs, including students with disabilities, students who are alienated from school, and students whose linguistic or cultural backgrounds differ from mainstream society. The course focuses on disability as the context for examining student diversity and the schools. The course provides an overview of legislative mandates relating to students with disabilities, of teacher roles for identifying and referring students, of available educational programming options, and of approaches for creating more inclusive school environments. The course challenges prospective teachers to make connections between what is known about human development and diversity and what is believed about human dignity and the purposes of American education and about what is known about current educational practices and what is possible in terms of educational vision. This course will have an Early/Middle Childhood focus when paired with Education 111 and a Middle Childhood/Adolescence focus when paired with Education 112. Field experience of 5 hours with students or adults with disabilities is required.  

 

EDUC 150  Phonics for Reading and Writing      
4 credits        
Linder, Roberta

No prerequisites
This course introduces students to the developmental nature of reading and writing with an emphasis on the importance of decoding in relation to fluency and comprehension.  The course focuses on the related cueing systems that children use as they read a text: graphophonic, syntactic, and semantic. Students will learn about the key concepts of reading (i.e., concepts of print, phonological/phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, phonics, morphology) and orthography (i.e., alphabet, pattern, meaning).  Students will demonstrate that they are able to explain and give examples of the principles necessary to teach readers to use phonics and structural analysis to unlock unknown words in text.  They will learn how to teach phonics and other decoding strategies using different materials and instructional methods that enable children to hear sounds and make the speech-print connection.  Students will also develop an understanding of the assess-evaluate-plan-teach cycle as it relates to reading and writing instruction.  Twenty hours of clinical/field experience will be required in which students will assess and create/implement plans in order to tutor a student in the use of phonics and other decoding and spelling strategies.

 

EDUC 275  Integrating Literature, Art, Drama, Dance and Music throughout the Early Childhood Curriculum
4 credits                    
Lawson, Lora

Prerequisites: Education 103 or 104, Education 111/120 plus two 4-credit courses from two different areas of the arts (music, art, drama or dance). One art course may be taken concurrently.
The audience for this course is prospective early childhood teachers. The goal is for preservice teachers to learn how to teach about dimensions of the human experience that support arts integration, including multiple ways of knowing, brain-based teaching and learning, creativity and creative problem solving, artistic and aesthetic development, and curriculum integration. An arts integration paradigm employed throughout the course shows potential teachers how to teach with, about, in, and through the arts. After an examination of arts integration research, the necessary knowledge base and teaching strategies needed to use the arts as tools for learning concepts and skills in science, social studies, math, and reading/language arts is studied. The role of children's literature is emphasized in units on each art form. Literature is treated as a distinct art form in its own right as well, and students can expect to do reading in all genre of literature including poetry. Special emphasis is given to literature dealing with issues of diversity. Assignments include the preparation of a portfolio of artwork representing use of major media and art concepts taught in schools. Students will learn how to align lessons and strategies with the National Standards for the Arts, as well as state academic content standards. Field experience of 20 hours is required.

 

EDUC 276  Integrating Literature, Art, Drama, Dance and Music throughout the Middle Grades Curriculum
4 credits
Lawson, Lora

Prerequisites: Education 103 or 104, Education 111 /120 or 112/120 plus two 4-credit courses from two different areas of the arts (music, art, drama or dance). One art course may be taken concurrently.
The audience for this course is prospective middle childhood teachers. The goal is for preservice teachers to learn how to teach about dimensions of the human experience that support arts integration, including multiple ways of knowing, brain-based teaching and learning, creativity and creative problem solving, artistic and aesthetic development, and curriculum integration. An arts integration paradigm employed throughout the course shows potential teachers how to teach with, about, in and through the arts. After an examination of arts integration research, the necessary knowledge base and teaching strategies needed to use the arts as tools for learning concepts and skills in science, social studies, math, and reading/language arts is studied. The role of young adult literature is emphasized in units on each art form. Literature is treated as a distinct art form in its own right as well, and students can expect to do reading in all genre of literature including poetry. Special emphasis is given to literature dealing with issues of diversity. Assignments include the preparation of a portfolio of artwork representing use of major media and art concepts taught in schools. Students will learn how to align lessons and strategies with the National Standards for the Arts, as well as state academic content standards. Field experience of 20 hours is required.

 

EDUC 303  Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood                
4 credits        
Lawson, Lora

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Concurrent registration with Education 341.
This course explores the historical, philosophical, psychological, and social foundations of early childhood education as they relate to present day practice. Developmentally appropriate practice in program design and implementation, authentic assessment, family involvement, and the professional role of child advocate define the template applied to the exploration of a variety of early childhood programs. Course work includes attention to technology as a tool for instruction, assessment, and communication. The course examines social issues, changing views of early childhood, new findings in brain development, the critical importance of learning in the early years, and factors that impact early learning. Students use local, state and national curricular guidelines to design developmentally appropriate instruction and learning experiences and safe and healthy learning environments. Students design strategies for observing, interpreting, and presenting formative and summative assessment data related to the young child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical growth and development. The importance of family involvement including sensitivity to family structures and assistance to families in need, and professional roles (including advocacy for the needs of young children and collaboration with appropriate agencies), are stressed.  Field experience of 25 hours is required. 

 

EDUC 306 Teaching and Learning in the High School
4 semester hours
Broidy, Steve

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.
This course focuses on teaching, planning, and the particular curricular and instructional demands of the high school setting. Other specific areas to be examined are literacy in the content areas, integration of curriculum, assessment, multiculturalism, and technology. The scope and sequence of the secondary content area curriculum provides the basis for this course. Short-range and long-term planning is thoroughly investigated and formally integrated through the examination of local, state, and national curricular guidelines, high school texts, and state-mandated testing requirements. Another major aspect of the course is literacy, especially reading and writing in the content areas, and critical listening and viewing of print and non-print media. Integration of curriculum and interdisciplinary teaching are also addressed as students cooperatively examine and then plan for and teach lessons related to their teaching field. Field experience of 35 hours involving observation and teaching at the high school level grades 9-12 is required.

 

EDUC 311  Developing Literacy in Early Childhood      
4 credits        
Whitlock, Tracy

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education, Education 303 or concurrent registration in 303.  
This course prepares the teacher to teach reading in developmentally appropriate ways to children ages 3-8 years. The course examines reading instruction to foster reader strategies that maximize comprehension and fluency in a variety of genre and for a variety of purposes. Strategies for designing literacy-rich classrooms, routines, and materials to assist young children in using their personal knowledge of oral language for investigating the deep and surface structure of many written forms of language are explored. Curriculum design and implementation, assessment and evaluation, and family involvement are emphasized in relation to the particular needs of the young child's cognitive, social/emotional, and physical development. Course work includes attention to technology as a tool for instruction, assessment and communication. Field experience of 30 hours in a primary-grade placement (grades K-3) is required. 

 

EDUC 328  Teaching Science in Early Childhood          
3 credits        
McCurdy, Cathy

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education.
An examination of the nature of science learning for young children, including scientific inquiry and discovery learning, the relationship between the physical world and the living environment, thematic learning, issues in health and fitness, and use of technology today. The course builds on the curricular design and methodology components of prerequisite education methods courses and focuses this body of knowledge and skills on the teaching of science. Specifically, local, state, and national curricular guidelines are used to design instruction and prepare a variety of methods for assessing student understanding. Instruction is also provided in selecting and using a variety of instructional media, resources, and technology specific to the field. The course includes experience and hands-on activities to promote process skills development and presents approaches for promoting positive attitudes toward science for students regardless of gender, ethnic background, or socioeconomic status. The course addresses development of safety practices in science instruction. Field experience of 15 hours is required.

 

EDUC 336  Teaching Language Arts in Middle Grades
2 credits
Arnold, Barbara

Prerequisites: Education 305, and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
A thorough examination and application of the various methods for teaching the language arts and adolescent literature is the foundation for this course. Interdisciplinary teaching and integration of middle school content through language arts is also an emphasis. Field experience of 10 hours related to teaching language arts at the middle grades level is required.

 

EDUC 337  Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades
2 credits
Staff

Prerequisites: Educ 305  Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved.
This course examines the principles, methods, and materials used to help students develop an understanding of mathematics in the middle grades. The course focuses on three main arenas of teachers’ work: 1) establishing a classroom culture that supports the development of students’ mathematical proficiency in the middle grades; 2) interpreting and developing middle grade students’ mathematical thinking; and, 3) designing and teaching mathematics lessons that follow local, state, and national guidelines for middle grades curricula.

More specifically, the course considers the roles of students, teachers, curricula, and community in the mathematics’ learning environment. Establishing a middle grades learning environment centers on developing a commitment and capacity to be able to promote equity in mathematics learning, which means teaching in ways that actively support the learning of every student. The course analyzes methods for establishing problem-based learning environments unique to the middle grades that utilize concrete materials, technology, classroom discourse, appropriate mathematical tasks, and a variety of assessment tools in order to meet the diverse needs of students. Skills needed for teaching middle grades students such as appropriate mathematical language, representations, reasoning, the ability to relate mathematics to the real world and other areas of the curriculum, and an understanding of current issues in mathematics education are addressed in the course. Students will complete field experience assignments as a part of this course.

 

EDUC 338  Teaching Science in Middle Grades
2 credits
McCurdy, Cathy

Prerequisites: Educ 305, and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
An examination of the nature of science to enable students to engage in scientific inquiry and make decisions that are evidence-based and reflect a thorough understanding of the interrelationships among science, technology and society. Field experience of 10 hours related to teaching science at the middle grades level is required.  

 

EDUC 339  Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades
2 credits
Manoloff, Mike

Prerequisites: Educ 305, and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
An examination of the nature of social studies and social studies teaching that enables all students to become informed citizens who are active participants in a democratic society and in an interdependent world. Field experience of 10 hours related to teaching social studies at the middle grades level is required

 

EDUC 341 Including Students with Special Needs in Early Childhood Classes        
4 credits        
McGuffey, Amy

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Concurrent registration in Education 303
An examination of characteristics, needs, and educational programming for students with disabilities or developmental delays and those who are gifted in early childhood (P-3) classes. The course builds on information presented in Education 120 and focuses on knowledge and skills for identifying and accommodating students with special needs in general education and inclusive settings. Specifically, the course examines characteristics of students with special needs, provides a rationale for needs-based decision making, and provides knowledge and skills concerning teacher roles on intervention assistance teams, multidisciplinary IEP planning teams, and in intervention-based evaluation procedures. The course provides knowledge and skills for designing informal assessments, for documenting student learning, for using technology to support instruction of students with special needs, for developing skills in making accommodations in curriculum and instruction in the general education class setting, and for promoting self esteem and social interactions. Skills for promoting parental involvement, collaborative problem solving, team planning, and co-teaching are also addressed. Field experience of 25 hours involving observing and teaching students with special needs ages 3-5 is required.

 

EDUC 342  Including Students with Special Needs in Middle and Secondary Grades
2 credits
Fraley, Phil

Prerequisites: Permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
An examination of characteristics, needs, and educational programming for students identified with disabilities and those who are gifted in the middle or secondary grades. The course builds on information presented in Education 120 and provides prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for identifying and accommodating students with special needs in general education settings. Field experience connected to the 90-hour block before full-time student teaching is required. Observing and teaching students with special needs at the middle grades or high school level is required.

 

EDUC 345  Assessment and Strategies for Students with Literacy Difficulties         
4 credit                      
Linder, Roberta
Whitlock, Tracy

Prerequisites:  EDUC 341 (early childhood); EDUC 311 (early childhood); EDUC 304/305 (middle childhood) or concurrent enrollment in EDUC 311 or 304/305.
This course examines theories and recent research concerning reading and writing assessment and instruction with a focus on the diverse needs of learners.  Candidates will engage in designing instruction for individuals and small groups that utilizes current best practices related to oral language, concepts of print, phonological/phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, phonics and decoding, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, or writing.  The clinical component will provide practice using principles of authentic assessment, interpretation of results, planning interest-based and strengths-focused lessons, explicit and inductive instruction, and on-going evaluation of the progress of learners. The course culminates in an assessment report that includes the results of literacy assessments administered, areas of need for instruction and student responses to instruction, and recommendations for teachers and parents. The course includes a 25-hour field experience. 

 

EDUC 346  Teaching Language Arts in Secondary Schools
2 semester hours
Arnold, Barbara

Prerequisites: Educ 305 or 306 and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
A thorough examination and application of the various methods for teaching the language arts and adolescent literature is the foundation for this course.   Interdisciplinary teaching and integration of secondary school content through language arts is also an emphasis. Field experience of 10 hours related to teaching language arts at the secondary level is required.

 

EDUC 347 Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisites: Educ 306  Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved.
This course examines the principles, methods, and materials used to help students develop an understanding of mathematics in secondary school grades. The course focuses on three main arenas of teachers’ work: 1) establishing a classroom culture that supports the development of students’ mathematical proficiency; 2) interpreting and developing students’ mathematical thinking; and, 3) designing and teaching mathematics lessons that follow local, state, and national guidelines for grades 7-12 curricula.
More specifically, the course considers the roles of students, teachers, curricula, and community in the mathematics’ learning environment. Establishing a secondary school learning environment centers on developing a commitment and capacity to be able to promote equity in mathematics learning, which means teaching in ways that actively support the learning of every student. The course analyzes methods for establishing problem-based learning environments for the variety of courses and grades found in the secondary school setting in order to meet the diverse needs of students, earning environments utilize concrete materials, various forms of technology, classroom discourse, mathematical tasks, and a variety of assessment tools that are suitable for the secondary mathematics course being taught. Skills needed for teaching secondary school students such as appropriate mathematical language, representations, reasoning, the ability to relate mathematics to the real world and other areas of the curriculum, and an understanding of current issues in mathematics education are addressed in the course. Students will complete field experience assignments as a part of this course.

 

EDUC 348. Teaching Science in Secondary Schools.
2 credits
McCurdy, Cathy

Prerequisites: Educ 305 or 306 and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
An examination of the nature of science to enable students to engage in scientific inquiry and make decisions that are evidence-based and reflect a thorough understanding of the interrelationships among science, technology, and society. Students will identify and apply science education research findings in the teaching and learning of science. Field experience of 10 hours relating to teaching science at the secondary level is required. Prerequisites: Educ 305 or 306 and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching. Every year.

 

EDUC 349  Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools
2 credits
Manoloff, Mike

Prerequisites: Educ 305 or 306 and permission to student teach or permission of the instructor. Concurrent registration with student teaching is required unless alternative student teaching arrangements have been approved. The class will meet during the five weeks preceding student teaching.
An examination of the nature of social studies and social studies teaching that enables all students to become informed citizens who are active participants in a democratic society and in an interdependent world. Field experience of 10 hours related to teaching social studies at the secondary level is required.

 

EDUC 432  Educating Students with Mild/Moderate Educational Needs in Middle and Secondary School          
4 credits                    
P. Fraley

Examination of the characteristics, needs, and educational programming for students in the middle and secondary grades identified as having learning mild/moderate cognitive, behavioral, sensory, and/or physical disabilities.  Focus is on procedures for designing content instruction that is accommodative for students with special needs, for teaching learning strategies and self-regulated learning, and helping students plan for post-school adjustment.  The course is designed for prospective teachers pursuing licensure in special education. 

Field experience of approximately 35 contact hours with middle or secondary-level students with special needs is required.

 

EDUC 433  Skills for Collaborative Problem Solving in Special Education
2 credits
Brannan, Sally

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education. Education 345, Education 430 and 432
Examination of special education teacher roles as consultant, collaborative problem solver, and co-teacher and the skills required to fulfill these roles. The course focuses also on issues and practices of inclusion, collaboration, co-teaching, conferencing, and working with families, school and community personnel.

 

EDUC 490  Independent Study      
Variable        
Staff

 

EDUC 492  Internship                     
Variable        
Staff

 

EDUC 495  Student Teaching        
Variable        
Cooper, JoEtta

 

EDUC 499  Honors Thesis / Project          
Variable        
Staff

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