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Geology - Spring 2014

GEOLOGY 110B – Introduction to Geology
4 semester hours
Bladh, Kenneth

Open to all students, except those who have previously taken a 100-level geology course. 
This course provides students with a survey of physical geology and how geologic knowledge can influence the decisions we face as citizens.  Students will gain an understanding of the nature and findings of the scientific study of earth materials, selected geologic processes and “deep time”. Content areas will probably include minerals and rocks, geologic time, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, streams, shorelines and glaciers.  Students will have input into the final selection of topics.
A Math Placement score of 22 or above is strongly recommended, as some lab exercises incorporate basic math skills and quantitative reasoning.

 

GEOLOGY 110B – Introduction to Geology
4 semester hours
Miller, David

Open to all students, except those who have previously taken a 100-level geology course. 
This course provides students with a topical view of Physical Geology and how it relates to the human race.  Students will gain an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry, geological processes, and geological issues.  Much of the material we will treat consists of items covered by the media and is intended to give students practical knowledge that they can apply to everyday life and to other disciplines.  A Math Placement score of 22 or above is strongly recommended, as many lab exercises incorporate basic math skills.  This course has both lecture and lab periods that each student must attend.  Note the required Saturday field trip to Ohio Caverns and Cedar Bog April 16 for section 01.

 

GEOLOGY 115B – Sustainable Earth?
4 semester hours
Fortner, Sarah

Students will explore the sustainability of earth resources.  This will include a canoe adventure on the Mad River watershed investigating water quality (during our lab meeting time).  In class and in the field, students will explore the following questions: Will we always have abundant fossil fuels and what are the consequences of our rate of consumption? How have natural landscapes been altered by agricultural practices? Are humans responsible for the greatest mass extinction? Students will be engaged in both quantitative (e.g. taking measurements in the field) and qualitative learning (discussions/debates). This class encourages diverse disciplinary perspectives essential to sustainably managing earth resources.  Science educators are also encouraged to take this course that is intentionally aligned with next generation content standards

 

GEOLOGY 160B – Environmental Geology
5 semester hours
Ritter, John

Open to all students, except those who have previously taken a 100-level geology course.  A math placement score of 22 or above is recommended.
Environmental Geology is an introduction to applied geology for both science and non-science students.  The primary objective of the course is to understand human interaction with the physical environment.  We will study natural hazards, such as flooding, mass wasting, and coastal erosion, natural resources, such as groundwater and wetlands, and the impact humans have on them.  Labs will focus on techniques used by geologists to study natural hazards and resources and to develop mitigation strategies when our impact on them is excessive.  Geology 160 counts as an introductory course for the geology major and minor, the environmental science major and environmental studies minor, and the marine science minor.

 

GEOLOGY 260 - Sedimentology
5 semester hours
Zaleha, Michael

Prerequisite:  Geology 150B or 160B or one course from the Geology 110B-116N Series in combination with Geology 151.
This course is a process-based approach to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks.  The first part of the course will investigate the physical processes of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition.  These principles will then be applied to the study of modern depositional environments and processes as they relate to the interpretation of ancient deposits.  Emphasis will be on siliciclastic and carbonate depositional environments and rocks.  Labs include flume work, identification of important sedimentary structures, lab and field methods, and field trips.

 

GEOLOGY 280 - Geology of Fossil Fuels and U  
4 semester hours 
Dr. Ken Bladh

Prerequisite: One course in Geology.
This course will study the geologic characteristics and theories of origin for important occurrences of mineral fuels (Uranium) and fossil fuels (Petroleum, Gas, Coal).  Industrial economies depend on the availability of affordable fuels and raw materials. The economic factors in resource availability, environmental considerations in their extraction and processing, and sustainability issues will also be examined. Learn how knowledge of this aspect of geology can contribute to the selection of sustainable options for fuels.  Expect at least one 1-2 day fieldtrip. 

 

GEOLOGY 315 – Watershed Hydrology
4 semester hours
Ritter, John

Prerequisite:  A minimum score of 22 on the Math Placement Exam is required.  Geology 150, 160, or one course from the Geology 110B-115B Series in combination with Geology 151.
Watershed Hydrology is designed to highlight methods used by hydrologists, hydrogeologists, and environmental scientists in their study of surface and subsurface hydrology of watersheds.  The course will focus on watershed processes, including precipitation, infiltration, generation of runoff, groundwater flow and streamflow, and the ways by which we measure and analyze them.  Class sessions will focus on concepts, and lab sessions will focus on methodology for collecting, modeling, analyzing or displaying hydrologic data.  The course will culminate with a local watershed problem.  The course will require significant field time, some of which may occur outside of class.

 

GEOLOGY 392 – Junior Seminar
1 semester hour
Ritter, John

Prerequisites: Open only to Geology majors with junior standing.
Required of all Geology majors during the spring semester of their junior year.  The purpose of this course is to prepare students in the skills necessary for them to conduct their senior research and to produce a written proposal for that research.  Every year.

 

GEOLOGY 460 – Geology Seminar:  Tectonics
4 semester hours
Zaleha, Michael

Prerequisites:  One course from the Geology 110B-115B Series or 150B or 160B
This course treats the large-scale motion of Earth’s segmented lithosphere.  Emphasis will be on Earth structure, composition, and rheology, the various tectonic settings that result from those properties, and the structural styles of rock deformation associated with those tectonic settings.  Alternate years.

 

GEOLOGY 492 - Senior Seminar
1 semester hour                                                                                           
Fortner, Sarah

Prerequisites:  Open only to senior geology or earth science majors.
Required of all Geology majors during their senior year.  Each student works on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member.  The project culminates in a written thesis, a public poster presentation, and public oral presentation.  Each student registers for this course during both semesters, 0 credits in the fall and 1 credit in the spring.  Prerequisite:  Senior standing and completion of Junior Seminar.  Every year.

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