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History - Spring 2014

HIST 105 C/H 1W  Pre-Modern World History
4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite:  none.   

Supplemental Instruction Available
This course considers how in the world ancient history matters in shaping the modern world. We will discard memorization of dates to consider real questions that have historical importance in thinking about the past. We will develop skills in reading, debating and argumentation as we consider issues such as how telling stories about the world reflect core values of society, what medical beliefs about the body tell us about gender roles in the past, what beliefs were foundation to the Islamic empire, how Genghis Khan ushered in the modern age, and to what degree ancient religious beliefs predetermine the political and ethical history of a community. We will read primary sources from period, examine archaeological remains of material culture and read historical fiction as a way to engage with these questions and establish skills in thinking critically about the past.  Reading and writing intensive.

 

HIST 106C/H 01   Modern World
4.00 credits
Paddison, Josh
Prerequisite:  none.   

This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all of the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 112H 01 Modern Europe
4.00 credits
Pfeifer, Justin
Prerequisite:  none.

Our course will examine European history from the Protestant Reformation to the end of the First World War. Western civilization has created numerous problems as well as achieved many significant accomplishments in the modern period. The world still reflects many of the religious, political, economic, social, and cultural influences that developed throughout European history. In order to understand today’s world we must investigate the role of Europe in the past, including topics such as imperialism, the Atlantic slave trade, rise of capitalism, the age of revolution and reaction, the era of national unification, and downfall of European empires in the twentieth century. Students’ are evaluated based upon the following criteria: attendance, quizzes, response papers, book reviews, and primary source exercises.

 

HIST 121H  01  US History I
4.00 credits
Taylor, Thomas
Prerequisite: none.
An introduction to US history from colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. The course combines lecture and discussions to develop an understanding the facts and story of American history and to problems in interpreting that story. The course is divided into three units: early America to the revolution; form the revolution into the early republic; and the era of the Civil War. Books include James L. Roark et al, The American Promise, Volume I (4/e ; The Bedford Glossary for U.S. History; John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government.  Not writing intensive. Quizzes and tests.

 

HIST 127H 01 and 02  The United States since 1945
4.00 credits
Wood, Molly

Prerequisite:  none.
In 1945, as World War II ended, a new ideological conflict engulfed the world.  The “Cold War” would dominate U.S. history and international relations for the next five decades.  This class will explore how and why the Cold War began, how it shaped U.S. foreign and domestic policy, how and why it ended and how the U.S. has engaged with the rest of the world since it ended.  We will assess U.S. relationships with other areas of the world as well as the important social, political and economic changes taking place at home in the post-war era.  We will explore both broad questions (Why do we remember the 1950s as a time of domestic tranquility?  How do we assess the social disruptions and activism of the 1960s?) and specific questions (What was Watergate? What happened during the Iranian Hostage crisis?) This class will give students the opportunity to examine recent U.S. history in detail, to place U.S. history in a larger global context, and to learn basic skills of historical analysis.  The course will consist of lecture, class discussion and reading and writing assignments.  Attendance is required. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, and the timely completion of all assignments. 

 

HIST 162C Modern Asia
4.00 Credits
Pfeifer, Justin
Prerequisite:  None

Our course will examine modern East Asian history from 1600 to the present. The major emphasis will be on the histories of three countries: Korea, China, and Japan. East Asia from 1600 is a multi-cultural course which focuses on the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of these nations. The investigation of this modern period will allow us to explore key events in Asian history which ultimately affected the entire world. Among the topics to be examined are the rise and fall of the Qing dynasty in China, the Tokugawa bakufu in Japan, and the Choson dynasty in Korea. Following these periods, we will explore the path towards Communism in China; the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa periods of Japan; and the events contributing towards the division of Korea at the end of World War II. Evaluation for this course will be based on the following criteria: attendance, quizzes, primary source exercises, and book reviews.

 

HIST 202H 1W  Children of the Past
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E and  Sophomore standing.  
What was it like growing up in the past? Did pre modern people have a “childhood?” Historians have recently turned their attention to investigating the private lives of medieval and early modern people. In this class we will explore what historians have uncovered about growing up in the past. We will examine the experiences of children in medieval London and Florence, Reformation Germany and sixteenth-century France.  This course will also examine how historians “do” history. What methods, theories, philosophies inform how historians have approached examining the history of childhood? What are the issues that confront historians in regard to the use of primary sources and historiographic traditions? Should historians be objective? Can they be objective? Each of those questions is fundamental to the task, vocation and obligation of the historian. To address such issues, students will read, analyze and critique primary sources. The “history” of historical interpretation, or historiography, will also be explored through a series of monographs and articles. Students will write several short analytical essays, as well as a longer historiographical paper, and participate in discussion and debate.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.  Writing intensive. 

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 203H 1W The Historian’s Craft:  Race and Comics, 1865-1945
4.00 Credits
Paddison, Josh
Prerequisite:  ENGL101E and sophomore standing.

What is the Historian’s Craft? History 203 is dedicated to teaching students how historians “craft” history. Since historians spend much of their time engaged in research and writing, the main focus of this class is to teach you how to research and write a research paper. Our topic will be representations of race in American comics during the period 1865 to 1945. Following the Civil War, comics became phenomenally popular with Americans of all ages, regions, and class backgrounds. As a result, comics became an important arena where ideas about race were made and re-made on a daily basis. Combining the authority of text with the potency of image, drawing on humor as well as political commentary, comics shaped, reflected, and challenged Americans’ notions of racial difference. In addition to examining caricatured depictions of African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Irish Catholics, and Jews, we will explore how ethnic and racial minorities themselves employed comics to challenge and subvert prevailing stereotypes. Attendance required. Students will research and write a 12-page paper on a topic of their own choosing related to race and comics. Writing Intensive.

 

HIST240H  01  Medieval England through Novels and Films
4.00 Credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite:  None

Supplemental Instruction Available.
From the grubby peasant to men in tights to corpulent kings, images of “Merrie Olde England” abound in popular culture. This course will examine the history of England from the time of King Arthur through the fourteenth century (roughly 500-1400 AD) through novels and film. These modern interpretations will provide entry into the history of these centuries and will be paired with medieval sources to examine the authenticity of their depiction of England’s medieval centuries. Students will be expected to master the history of medieval England, but also to sharpen and develop their critical thinking skills as they interact with popular depictions, the interpretations of scholars and the voices of medieval people. This course counts toward the PAST minor.   

 

HIST301  01 The American West in History and Myth
4.00 Credits
Paddison, Josh
Prerequisite: Junior Standing, HIST 105C/H, HIST 110H or HIST 210C/H

Although the boundaries of what is considered “the west” have shifted over the past three centuries, the region has always loomed large in American mythology. Imagined at various times as a virginal wilderness, savage frontier, bountiful garden, and heavenly utopia, the west has served as a reflection of Americans’ wildest hopes and most urgent fears. This course will track North Americans’ changing views of the west during the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. We will examine a wide range of perspectives, including that of explorers, Presidents, bandits, miners, immigrants, artists, poets, filmmakers, novelists, pop singers, rappers, and videogame designers. We will pay special attention to how Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans viewed the transformation of lands they deemed not west but north, east, or home. Attendance required. Students will research and write a 15-page paper on a topic of their own choosing related to the American west. Writing Intensive.

 

HIST 302 1W Archaeology:  Near East - Ancient Mesopotamia, Syria-Palestine
4.00 Credits
Brooks-Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite:  Junior Standing, 1 History Course or Permission

This writing-intensive course examines the history and great discoveries of the ancient Near East including the Neolithic Age settlements, the empires of ancient Mesopotamia and Syria-Palestine, and the Persian Empire that unites all these territories together in the sixth-century BCE. Through a study of archaeology, ancient literature, and documentary evidence, we will explore the distinctive cultural attributes of the Akkadians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Hebrews, Hittites, Mitanni, Persians, and Sumerians. We will also learn how who discovered the most important archaeological discoveries of these communities and how archaeological science has changed the study of the region. "Archaeology of the Near East" will expose students to the numerous first developments that emerge in this region such as urbanism, agricultural development, and imperial identities. Students will write a research paper that explores one of the great empires of the Near East or write a biography of one of the archaeologists who specialized in Near Eastern archaeology and history.

 

HIST 325 1W  Topics in Diplomacy: The Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
4.00 credits
Wood, Molly

Prerequisites: HIST 106C/H or HIST 122H or HIST 127H  or permission of instructor.
In an increasingly interdependent world it is important to understand the historical forces responsible for creating the current international climate and the relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world.  This seminar-style course will explore the origins and outcomes (so far) of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.   Class sessions will mix some lecture with substantial discussion based on common readings (books, articles and documents).  Attendance is required.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, and the timely completion of all reading and writing assignments.  Writing Intensive. 

 

HIST 411 1W   Senior Seminar
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite:  Senior history majors only and HIST 202, 203 and eight hours of 300 Lvl History Courses.
This capstone to your history experience allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of historical method, historiography, and research skills.  You will research and write a long paper based on previous historical coursework, present that research in an oral presentation, and engage in discussions with other students about the nature and practice of history.  Papers, small assignments, tests, and in-class discussion constitute the graded coursework.   Writing intensive.

 

HIST 490 00.  Independent Study
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

HIST 499 00.   Senior Honors Thesis
0.00-8.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.
 

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