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International Studies - Spring 2014

BUSN 250C 01 International Business
4 credits
Jeong, S

Prerequisites:  None
This is an introductory course in international business. The basic content of the course includes (1) an overview of the means of conducting international business, with an emphasis on what makes international different from domestic; (2) the effects of the social systems within countries on the conduct of international business; (3) the major theories explaining international business transactions and the institutions influencing those activities; (4) institutions that measure and facilitate international transactions; (5) the dynamic interface between countries and companies attempting to conduct foreign business activities; (6) corporate strategy alternatives for global operations; and (7) international activities that fall largely within functional disciplines such as marketing and human resource management.  10/13

 

ECON 190S 1M-3M Principles of Economics
4 credits
Frost, Marcia; Tiffany, Frederick

Prerequisites: Students must have attained the math placement level 22 to enroll.
An introduction to basic principles of economics. Topics covered include supply and demand, marginal analysis, competition, profit maximization, aggregate demand, and supply, the level of employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and international trade. Lecture/discussion format. 10/13

 

ECON 220 01 Economics of Developing Areas
4 credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisites: ECON 190S                                                                                           Introduction to the concepts, measures, theories, and strategies of modern economic growth and development relevant to the low-income nations of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The course builds on the theories and models introduced in Economics 190, explores the inter-relationships between human development and economic growth, and allows each student to investigate the development experience of a particular nation. 10/13

 

ECON 260C 01 East Asian Economies
4 credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisite: ECON 190
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important and pressing current issues facing the Northeastern Asian economies of China, Mongolia and North Korea; to new economic concepts, theories and models; and to many sub-fields of the discipline, including economic history, environmental economics, political economy, comparative economics, institutional economics and economies in transition.  It is also multidisciplinary, integrating economics with political science, geography, geology, sociology, environmental science, history, and business.  Cross-listed with East Asian Studies and International Studies; CLAC option. 10/13

 

GEOG 101S  01 Cultural Geography
4 credits
Limoges, Lane

Pre-requisites:  None
GEOG 101S introduces the student to the breadth of human geography and in particular how populations influence the way the environment is developed and utilized by people and the subsequent patterns they create on the landscape.  Topics will include: the spatial organization of human activities, ways in which social processes and structures can be understood through a geographic lens, geographic perspectives of human/environment interactions, patterns of economic activity, the relationship between political States and cultures, and the impact of globalization.  The course will follow a lecture/discussion format to enhance critical thinking and writing abilities.  The overall objective of the course is to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to think critically about contemporary geographical patterns and processes while cultivating the student’s own geographical imagination. 10/13

 

GEOG 240S 01 Economic Geography
4 credits
Limoges, Lance

Prerequisite:  None
Geography 240S introduces students to the study of economic geography. In particular, this course will explore how geographic and economic conditions affect the products, industries, commerce and resources of the world in general, and the United States in particular. The course begins with an examination of population and resources, followed by a thorough study of basic location theory for primary, secondary and tertiary industries. Then we will move on to study the role of geography in the modern global economy, particularly as it relates to spatial patterns in local, regional, national, and international economic growth and business development. 10/13

 

GEOG 250S/C 01  China’s Geography
4 credits
Lenz, Ralph

Prerequisite: None
Despite many parallels between China’s physical environment and that of the USA, there are some notable contrasts. With a geographic area extending from deserts of Central Asia to the Pacific Ocean, environmental diversity within the region is pronounced.  This regional course will examine environmental impacts on cultural and economic patterns. China offers a surprising amount of cultural diversity, and cultural and economic contrasts between the Han and various minority populations, a topic not covered in most East Asian Studies classes, will be emphasized.  As China undergoes a tremendous economic transition, huge disparities between the interior of the country and its coast have resulted. Demographic, agricultural, and urban patterns will be examined. Evaluation will be based on exams and quizzes, a project, and an oral presentation about one of China’s sub regions or minority groups. CLAC option available for this class. 10/13

 

HIST 106C/H 01 Modern World
4 credits
Paddison, Josh

Prerequisites: None
This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present. Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all of the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today. Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.) 10/13

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time? If so, register for the CLAC components offered here. You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option. In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112. Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department. The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course. Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 325 1W Topics in Diplomacy: The Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
4 credits
Wood, Molly

Prerequisites: HIST 106C/H or HIST 122H or HIST 127H  or permission of instructor.
In an increasingly interdependent world it is important to understand the historical forces responsible for creating the current international climate and the relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world. This seminar-style course will explore the origins and outcomes (so far) of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Class sessions will mix some lecture with substantial discussion based on common readings (books, articles and documents).  Attendance is required. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, and the timely completion of all reading and writing assignments. 10/13
Writing Intensive

 

INTL 300S 01 Crossroads of Old & New Europe
4 credits
Goodman, Margaret

The Old and New Europe at the Crossroads of Globalization Through readings and guest lectures by a German expert in the field, students will examine major historical, economic, political, and social forces shaping the emergence of a new, transnational sense of European identity and Europe’s global partnership with other regions of the world. (ongoing)

 

POLI 305 1W European Politics
4 credits
Allan, James

Prerequisites: POLI 102S and Jr/Sr class standing
This seminar course focuses on European politics with special emphasis on changes in political and economic institutions and behavior since World War II. The course covers four main aspects of politics in Europe: i. Political institutions; ii. Political parties and political behavior; iii. Political economy; and iv. the European Union. Although the course is not designed on a country-by-country basis, we will examine most of the European countries (though some countries will get more attention than others). By the end of the class, students should be familiar with the evolution of the states in Europe, the evolution of different democratic political institutions throughout Europe, key differences in the economic institutions in these countries, and the major issues surrounding the future of Europe and the European Union in the wake of the recent global financial crisis. 10/13
WRITING INTENSIVE

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don't need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in any of the languages taught at Wittenberg: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian or Spanish.
Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department's offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

POLI 350 1W American Foreign Policy
4 credits
Yu, Bin

Prerequisites: POLI 101S or 251S and Jr class standing, or with permission
This course has three central components: (1) understanding the history of American foreign policy; (2) examining and explaining the process through which foreign policy is made; and (3) analyzing current foreign policy issues. Three papers and at least two oral presentations are required. The course is a seminar and students are expected to engage in extensive discussion based on individual research. No cap. 10/13
WRITING INTENSIVE

 

SOCI 110C/S 01-03 Cultural Anthropology
4 credits
Rowell, Kathy

Prerequisites:  None
This course introduces students to key concepts, methods, and approaches in cultural anthropology. Topics addressed include culture theory, fieldwork, language, ethnicity, tourism, media, popular culture, globalization, gender relations, social change, war, peace, development, and religion, among others. As this list suggests, anthropology is a discipline that draws on many other fields, and our course readings reflect that cross-disciplinarily.  A special focus on indigenous peoples of the world and humans rights issues will be explored. Course will include some opportunities to participate in applied anthropology projects and research. Ethnographic setting explored in this class range from the contemporary United States to Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe. 10/13

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