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Music - Spring 2014

I -- M U S I C   E N S E M B L E S

All students may participate in a variety of choral and instrumental music ensembles.  Music majors and minors must fulfill the ensemble requirement in their designated programs.  Initial placement in an ensemble is determined by means of an audition with the ensemble conductor; chamber ensembles are formed when sufficient interest warrants.  Successful participation in a music ensemble may earn one credit each semester toward the maximum allowed in the student’s degree program.  Please contact the ensemble conductor for further information.

Instrumental Ensembles
Music 173 - Handbell Choir, Trudy Faber
Music 175 - Jazz Ensemble, Adam McCord
Music 177 - Chamber Orchestra, Brandon Jones
Music 179 - Symphonic Band, Brandon Jones
Choral and Vocal Ensembles
            Music 183 - Opera Studio, Kimberley Buczek
Music 185 - Wittenberg Choir, Jimmy Shepherd
Music 187 - Wittenberg Singers, Jimmy Shepherd
Chamber Ensembles
Music 191 - Flute Ensemble, Lori Akins
 

II -- G E N E R A L   M U S I C   C O U R S E S

The student may enroll in the following General Music courses to satisfy 1) the requirements of the General Education Program (usually applicable to Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or Western Historical Perspectives or Non-Western Cultures: please check the Schedule of Classes for precise designations); 2) certain requirements in the music major or minor; or 3) the desire for the elective credit.  The courses are leveled in accord with the guidelines given below, which serve as prerequisites.

Courses at the A “100” level -- Generally open to all students.  Such courses assume no particular familiarity with music and tend to emphasize a substantial number of listening experiences.

Courses at the A “200” level -- The ability to read music and some experience in listening to music are recommended.  Most courses at this level are writing-intensive and presume the successful completion of English 101.

Courses at the A “300” level -- Because standard college-level music texts may be used, the ability to read music is required.  Students should have the ability to read critically from musical scores and literary sources of the period. Junior standing is recommended.

 

Music 101A - Elementary Music Theory
4 Credits
Shepherd, Jimmy

Prerequisites: none
A course designed for the non-major who wants to learn about basic music theory including scales, intervals, triads, keys, counterpoint, harmony, and analysis. A rudimentary ability to read music is helpful. The course includes extensive daily written and aural skills work, including sight-singing, performing rhythms, and dictation. Evaluation is by graded homework, written tests administered regularly throughout the course, and a final exam. By the end of the semester the successful student should have sufficient knowledge of the fundamentals of music to support additional music course work.

 

Music 110A - Understanding Music
4 Credits
Schubert, David

Prerequisites: none
A basic introductory course designed to explore some of the great works of musical art.  The materials of music, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and texture are examined in their historical contexts from the medieval period to the present.  Various forms of musical expression such as the fugue, sonata form, and theme and variations are also surveyed.  Listening to a wide variety of music and attendance at concerts is required.  The text is The Enjoyment of Music: An Introduction to Perceptive Listening by Joseph Machlis and Kristine Forney (11th Edition/Shorter Version,W.W. Norton & Company).

 

Music 110A - Understanding Music
4 Credits
Durrenberger, Christopher

Prerequisites: none
A basic introductory course designed to explore some of the great works of musical art.  The materials of music, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and texture are examined in their historical contexts from the medieval period to the present.  Various forms of musical expression such as the fugue, sonata form, and theme and variations are also surveyed.  Listening to a wide variety of music and attendance at concerts is required. The text is Understanding Music by Jeremy Yudkin (7th edition, Pearson)

 

Music 110A - Understanding Music
4 Credits
Crean, David

Prerequisites: none
A basic introductory course designed to explore some of the great works of musical art.  The materials of music, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and texture are examined in their historical contexts from the medieval period to the present.  Various forms of musical expression such as the fugue, sonata form, and theme and variations are also surveyed.  Listening to a wide variety of music and attendance at concerts is required.  The text is Kristine Forney and Joseph Machilis, The Enjoyment of Music, 11th ed. W.W. Norton & Co, 2011.

 

Music 120 - Functional Keyboard Skills
2 Credits
Durrenberger, Christopher

Prerequisites: Must be able to read music
A course designed to develop basic keyboard skills needed by non-keyboard music majors.  Rudiments of theory, keyboard technique, basic improvisation, and harmonization will be covered.  Taught in the electronic keyboard lab.  Text is Alfred’s Group Piano for Adults: An Innovative Method Enhanced with Audio and MIDI files for Practice and Performance by E.L. Lancaster & Kenon D. Renfrow.  (Book 1, second edition, Alfred.) 

 

Music 121 - 146 -- Applied Music Lessons
1 to 2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission
Applied music lessons are available for all students regardless of major, for a fee.  Please consult the Schedule for a complete list of offerings.

 

Music 321 - 346 - Advanced Applied Music Lessons
1 to 2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission
Students may take advanced applied lessons only after passing an examination in the applied area.

Enrollment and scheduling - Initial enrollment and teacher assignment can be arranged by contacting the chairperson of the Department of Music in Krieg Hall.  At the time of the first lesson, the student’s level and course of study will be determined.  In Applied Organ, Piano, and Voice, it may be necessary for students to audition in order to ascertain the suitability of applied study and to arrange for teacher assignment.  If the student does not read music, enrollment in Music 100 (Fundamentals of Music: A Studio Course) may be recommended in order to establish enough background so that the student can practice independently and in a profitable manner.  Because applied lessons are individually scheduled, it is necessary for continuing students to file copies of their proposed schedules with the departmental office before registering with the Registrar’s Office each semester lessons are taken.

Credit - Normally, weekly private lessons during the fifteen-week semester are 30 minutes in length and earn one credit.  The expected time for practice is at least one hour a day.  Should desire and program permit, it is possible to enroll for a 60-minute lesson every week and earn two credits.  The expectations for practice time increase proportionately.  The grade earned will be figured into the cumulative grade-point-average of the student.

Fees - During the 2013-2014 academic year, the fee for private applied music lessons is $400 for each credit taken.

Practice rooms - Every student who is registered for applied music lessons may reserve suitable practice space of Krieg Hall.  Since most practice rooms are always kept locked, a rental fee is required. Please consult the departmental office in order to obtain a key and to schedule practice rooms and rehearsal space.  NOTE: Only students who are involved in the programs of the Department of Music, i.e., applied lessons or ensembles, may rent a practice room.  Practice rooms are shared and may NOT be used for storage.

Lockers - Lockers with combination locks for the storage of music and musical instruments are available in Krieg Hall and may be rented by contacting the office of the Department of Music, Krieg 301B.  Liability coverage is the responsibility of the student. 

 

IV -- I N T E N S I V E   M U S I C   C O U R S E S

The following intensive courses in music are open to all students with the permission of the instructor; they are primarily designed for the music major.  Further information about the courses may be obtained from the departmental office.

Music 155 - Music Theory I
2 Credits
Kazez, Daniel

Prerequisite: Music 102 or equivalent, or by placement examination.
A study of the harmonic practice of the common-practice period of classical music (1600s-1800s), including triads in first inversion and second inversion, nonchord tones, seventh chords, and an introduction to chromatic harmony. Grading is based on daily assignments, tests, and a final project. It is recommended that Music 155 be taken concurrently with Music 156 (Music Skills I).

 

Music 156 - Music Skills I
2 Credits
Shepherd, Jimmy

Prerequisite: Music 102 or equivalent, or by examination. It is recommended that Music 156 be taken concurrently with Music 155: Music Theory I.
Students learn to sing standard pitch and rhythm pattern, to facilitate the playing, singing, conducting, composing, and studying of music. Significant and regular outside practice is required. Grading is based on daily homework. Ear Training is also included: Students learn to notate pitch patterns and rhythm patterns presented aurally, so that they can write down music they hear or create. Grading is based on dictation exams.

 

Music 199 - Music Practicum
0 Credit
Georges, Corwin

Prerequisite: none
Monitors attendance and participation by the music major at concert and recital events, at special workshops and clinics.  Includes attending or participating in a monthly student recital.  Required of all music majors every semester.

 

Music 216A/C - Musics of the World
4 Credits
Kazez, Daniel

Prerequisite: none
The world’s musics are as diverse as its lands, peoples, cultures, and languages. We study the music and culture of several disparate societies, including India, Africa, Indonesia, Thailand, and Latin America. This course serves as an introduction to “ethnomusicology” (the study of music in culture). At the conclusion, you will be equipped to answer the following questions: (a) What role does music play in the lives of its composers, performers, and listeners? (b) What musical elements create the unique sound of the music of a given culture? (c) What other elements of culture (language, art, literature, society, etc.) are relevant to the study of a society’s music?

 

Music 235 – Intro to Pedagogy and Diction
2 Credits
Schubert, David

Applied class instruction in vocal techniques, emphasizing vocal pedagogy, teaching procedures and materials, and English diction utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).  Recommended for all students majoring in voice and required of all music education majors. Also, the text is Ware, Clifton.  Basics of Vocal Pedagogy: The Foundations and Process of Singing (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998, ISBN: 0-07-068289-5).

Music 259 - Analysis of Music After 1900
2 Credits
Kazez, Daniel

Prerequisite: Music 257, or permission of the instructor.
The music composed after 1900 differs vastly from the music of the common-practice period (1600s-1800s). After 1900, composers used innovative techniques to create melody and harmony, elements such as orchestration, form, and rhythm were also distinctive. Through reading, discussion, analysis, and composition, we will study this music in an attempt to understand (both on paper and by sound) the manner in which composers after 1900 achieved originality, organization, and cohesion in their music. Grades will be based on several tests and a major analysis project.

 

Music 304H 1W - History of Western Music to 1750
4 Credits
Jones, Brandon

Prerequisite: English 101.  Must be able to read music.
This course tracks the important musical developments from early Greek music through the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, and studies the music and lives of the composers whose creativity brought new ideas to fruition. Topics include the following: chant and early polyphony, Ars Antiqua and Ars Nova, the development of the Franco-Netherlands style, music of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, Italian bel canto, opera and opera-related forms, instrumental music of the Baroque and especially the music of Bach and Handel. Required for music majors.  Writing intensive. 

 

Music 490 - Independent Study
1 to 4 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Approval of the Department Chair and supervising professor.
Individual project as arranged by the student with the supervising professor and the Department Chair.  May be writing intensive. 

 

Music 491 – Internship
2 to 4 Credits
Staff

Supervised learning-work experience at various on- or off-campus sites generally taken the senior year.  Usually involves a written report, a journal, or other assignments.

 

Music 495 - Senior Recital
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: At least three terms of advanced study in the primary area of applied music, senior standing, and concurrent registration in the area of advanced applied study. 
Presentation of a full-length recital in the primary area of applied music study. A challenging program to be determined in consultation with the applied music teacher. Designed as a culmination of preceding studies.  Program notes are also required.  Every year

 

Music 496 - Senior Recital & Paper with Honors
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: At least three terms of advanced study in the primary area of applied music, senior standing, and concurrent registration in the area of advanced applied study and permission of the department chair. 
Presentation of a full-length recital in the primary area of applied music study.  A challenging program to be determined in consultation with the applied music teacher.  Designed as a culmination of preceding studies.  A written paper of moderate length and relating to some aspect of the program is also required.  Required of Bachelor of Music degree students.  An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course.  Writing intensive. 

 

Music 497 - Senior Portfolio Review
0 Credit
Staff

Presentation of selected classwork and related materials and resources and the demonstration of musical skills and competencies in an oral examination format before a committee of three faculty members.  Required of the major in music education.  The review and examination should occur at the beginning of the senior year and at least one full semester prior to the student taking Education 495: Student Teaching. 

 

Music 498 - Senior Project
2 Credits
Staff

Full-scale investigation of a selected topic or a production of a creative project.  Usually presented in a written form.  The project is juried by a committee of three faculty members. Both the project and the committee should be determined by the end of the student’s junior year and in consultation with the academic adviser and the department chair.  An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course.  Students qualified to pursue departmental honors will register for Music 499 with permission of the department chair.  Writing intensive. 

 

Music 499 -Senior Project with Honors
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair
Full-scale investigation of a selected topic or a production of a creative project.  Usually presented in a written form.  The project is juried by a committee of three faculty members. Both the project and the committee should be determined by the end of the student’s junior year and in consultation with the academic adviser and the department chair.  An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course.  Writing intensive. 

V -- M U S I C    E D U C A T I O N

Music 233 - Percussion Instruments
1 Credit
Smarelli, Mark

Prerequisites: Music 165 or permission of Chair
This course is for music majors. A study of the fundamentals of percussion instruments with emphasis on teaching techniques, methods, and materials.  Study will primarily be on snare, mallet, and timpani technique.  Also included will be an overview of Latin and orchestral percussion instruments. Grading is based on understanding of necessary terms and concepts, and on performance skills acquired in the course.

 

Music 350 Introduction to Conducting
2 Credits
Jones, Brandon

Prerequisite: Music 257 or permission of the department chair
Introduces and develops the skills necessary for a musician to conduct an ensemble. The style and mechanics of the physical act of conducting are discussed and the student applies this knowledge by conducting an ensemble consisting of members of the class. There will be discussions and written exams covering musical terminology and instrumental transposition as found in scores. Alternate years.

 

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