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Philosophy - Spring 2014

PHIL 110R 1M   Logic and Critical Reasoning
4 credits
Bailey, Julius

Prerequisite:  Math placement of 22
An introduction to traditional and symbolic logic that typically includes : (1) informal fallacies, (2) syllogistic logic, and (3) elementary sentential and predicate logic.  Students are required to construct proofs using a variety of formal methods. There will be a critical thinking element that will evaluate and engage in critiques of  love, music, and popular culture.  Math reasoning intensive.  Supplemental Instruction is available for both sections.

 

PHIL 203R 01 and 02.  Mysteries of Self & Soul
4 credits
Reed, Don

Prerequisite:  none
In this course students will explore the relationships between their answers to four classic problems: (1) How does your mind relate to your body? (2) Do you have free will, or are your actions and choices determined? (3) Will you survive the death of your body? And (4) is possession by a demon or other spirit possible? The two initial prompts for our considerations will be movies such as The Matrix and The Exorcist and texts from the history of philosophy and psychology.  Students will also read a book by a well known neuroscientist about findings from studies of the brain and will reflect on what these findings mean for the four questions listed above. Evaluations will be based on daily quizzes, periodic tests, and a final exam.

 

PHIL 311 1W.   Modern Philosophy
4 credits
Bailey, Julius

Prerequisite:  PHIL 310 or permission of instructor.
Modern philosophy (1600-1900) is one of the most fascinating time periods philosophy. It is during the modern period that philosophy began to be concerned with the kinds of methods and ideas that we think of today as philosophical.  Perhaps the most interesting thing about modern philosophy is that it is a period of radical scientific and social upheaval.  The beliefs we have in democracy and the faith we have in scientific method, for example, developed during the modern period, as did navigation methods and optics.  The modern period was one of the most hopeful times for social reform, but it also was a period of imperialism and colonialism, which did not have social reform for Others in mind.  We will study Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche as well as contemporary texts critiquing these readings.

The goals of this class are for you to engage texts from the modern period, to think critically about these texts and to understand the socio-political climate that lead to the development of these beliefs.   You will be assessed through your writing of a book review and a final paper, as well as a midterm, final, and reaction papers.    Writing intensive.

 

PHIL 400 1W.   Senior Seminar
4 credit hours
Bailey, Julius

Prerequisite:  PHIL 312  or permission of instructor.
The goal of this course is to complete a senior thesis in philosophy.  We will work on writing time management, thesis construction, research techniques, drafting, editing, writing collaboration, paper presentation and critiquing others' work. The course will include a symposium in which students will deliver brief versions of their theses for a department colloquium.  Writing intensive. 

 

PHIL 490 00.  Independent Study
1-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

PHIL 491 00.   Internship
1-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

PHIL 499 00.  Senior Honors Thesis
0-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Departmental Permission.

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