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Psychology - Spring 2014

PSYC 100S:  Understanding Psychology
4 semester hours
Woehrle, Nancy and DeVries, Jeffrey

Prerequisites:  None
An introductory-level survey course in psychology with a focus on how psychology can be applied to other fields of study and life in general; intended for students who do not plan to major or minor in psychology.  Covers topics in biological foundations of behavior, learning and memory, developmental psychology, motivation and emotion, abnormal psychology and psychotherapy, personality, and social psychology. This course is designed for individuals that are not planning to major or minor in Psychology and is not to be taken in conjunction with or in addition to Psychology courses 110-160.

 

PSYC 107Q Statistics
4 semester hours                                                                           
Brown, Cliff

Prerequisites:  To register for Psychology 107, a student must have a 23 or higher Mathematics Placement Level.  Contact the Math Workshop for details regarding this prerequisite.  A student may not receive credit for more than one introductory statistics course. (e.g., Math 127, Mgt. 210)
This is a course in applied statistics.  Its emphasis is on the mechanics of summarizing and analyzing data, with examples from the behavioral sciences.  The purpose of the course is to prepare students for other courses in Psychology and related disciplines and to help them conduct and interpret statistical analyses.

 

PSYC 110N:  Proseminar I:  Physiological
2 semester hours
Woehrle, Nancy

Prerequisites:  None
This course is an introduction to the study of the biological bases of behavior, and emphasizes the influence of brain processes on our thoughts and actions. We will discuss the structure and function of neurons, brain organization, sensation and perception, and the biological underpinnings of psychological disorders.

 

PSYC 130S:  Proseminar III:  Developmental
2 semester hours
Zembar, Mary Jo

Prerequisites:  None
This course examines development across the life span.  The first half of the course focuses on prenatal development and the changes in physical, motor, cognitive, and social skills that take place in the early years of life.  The second half of the course focuses on developmental issues unique to adolescents (puberty, at-risk behavior), adults (marriage, career development) and the aged (retirement, Alzheimer’s disease).  Students are required to participate in a limited number of research studies and to gain practical experience with children and adults by completing an observational and interview project.

 

PSYC 140S: Pro-seminar IV: Individual Differences
2 semester hours
Brookings, Jeffrey
Prerequisites: None
This course is an introduction to the scientific study of individual differences in intelligence and personality.  In the first part of the course, we consider theories of intelligence, how intelligence is measured, and current controversies about the proper use of intelligence test scores.  In part two of the course, we shift to the study of personality, including broad theories of personality (psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, trait) and new directions in personality research and measurement.

 

PSYC 150S: Pro-seminar V: Abnormal
2 semester hours
Little, Stephanie
Prerequisites:  None
This course is an introduction to the realm of psychology that focuses on identifying and treating psychological disorders. Key features of a variety of common mental illnesses will be considered. Also, different theoretical views regarding the causes of and treatments for mental illness will be covered. In addition, basic emotions and motivations are introduced. Student learning, including the ability to apply course concepts, will be assessed via exams and papers.

 

PSYC 160S:  Pro-seminar VI:  Social
2 semester hours
Brown, Clifford

Prerequisites:  None
This course is an introduction to social psychology, the scientific study of how others influence our beliefs, emotions, and behavior.  Topics include conformity, persuasion, social cognition, attribution, attitudes, prejudice, aggression, and nonverbal communication.  Three tests assess performance.  In addition, students are required either to participate in a limited number of research studies or to write a research paper.

 

PSYC 207M:  Experimental Design
5 semester hours
Anes, Michael

Prerequisite: Psychology 107 or another statistics course.
This laboratory course gives you hands-on experience with the basic principles of research in psychology: the logic and methodologies of collecting data in a scientific manner, and the concepts and techniques of applying statistics to collected data in order to draw conclusions. We will cover a variety of methodologies, emphasizing how you can use each of them yourself. As part of this course, you will design and implement a number of studies that involve collecting, analyzing, and interpreting original data, as well as reporting your findings. Each study will illustrate a different type of analytic tool or procedure, but the specific questions to be addressed in these studies will be determined by you.

 

PSYC 242:  Industrial/Organizational Psychology
4 semester hours
Bragg, Caleb
Prerequisite: Any Psychology or Business course.
Industrial/Organizational (IO) Psychology involves the application of psychological theory and research to understanding and improving job performance.  Work behavior may be studied from multiple perspectives (e.g., organizational, cultural, societal); because this is a psychology course, we will look at job behavior primarily from the perspectives of the individual worker and the employer.  That is, we will emphasize what individual workers do on the job, how well they do it, how we select and train people to do their jobs, and how we compensate them fairly for their work.  In addition, we will consider the effects of context—organizational variables, the physical environment, and employment law—on worker performance.  Finally, because we are concerned with employees’ well-being, as well as their performance, we will explore current issues (e.g., drug testing, sexual harassment, organizational innovations, and workplace violence) that affect the quality of work life. 

 

PSYC 280:  Child Abnormal Psychology
4 semester hours
Little, Stephanie
Prerequisite: Psychology 130S or Psychology 150S
This course examines the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological disorders in children and adolescents. Various theories, models, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are investigated in the context of research, case studies, and service-learning. An advanced course intended for students interested in working with youth in the fields of clinical psychology, social work, counseling, special education, and related specialties.

 

PSYC 321B:  Learning, Memory, and Cognition
5 semester hours
Anes, Michael

Prerequisites:  Psychology 120 and Psychology 207
This is a course in which we study major operations of the human mind; perceiving, remembering, acting, and thinking.  Specific areas of coverage include attention, visual search and object recognition, visual memory, general memory mechanisms (working and long-term), language, imagery, reasoning, and judgment.  We will discuss learning and memory in other species as well, and attempt to draw parallels that inform our understanding of human cognition.
Specific proposals about how the mind accomplishes particular tasks (models) have been advanced in the short, 50-year history of modern cognitive psychology.  We will see how these models have been tested, in part by participating in replications of classic cognitive psychology experiments.  Data, including the data we generate ourselves, will be discussed in detail.  We will write APA-style papers describing the nature of these tasks, the methods used, and the results obtained in the tasks.  Finally, we will plan and execute group experiments.
Writing Intensive

 

PSYC 341B:  Psychological Testing
5 semester hours
Brookings, Jeffrey

Prerequisites:  Psychology 107 or another statistics course and Psychology 140
This is a laboratory course examining principles of test construction, validation, and interpretation, with emphasis on measures of cognitive ability, personality characteristics, and psychological disorders.  Classes will be in lecture/discussion format.  Lab exercises emphasize psychometric evaluation of published psychological tests and hands-on experience administering and scoring simulated diagnostic tests. A group project requires students to construct and validate a psychological test.

 

PSYC 390:  Junior Seminar
No Credit
Brookings, Jeffrey
This seminar meets one hour per week and is designed to help students understand their various options as psychology majors.  This includes topics such as senior research projects and internships, senior comprehensive and GRE exams, possible career paths, graduate school applications, and graduate school and job interviews.  This class may include guest speakers and field trips based on students’ interests.  Psychology majors are required to take this no-credit seminar for one semester during their junior year.

 

PSYC 400W:  Research Seminar:  Interpersonal Behavior
4 semester hours
Brown, Clifford

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
Students in this course will work with the instructor on interpersonal behavior research in the area of social psychology. Students will become familiar with the current literature in a specific area of social psychology, and meet twice weekly to discuss research literature, develop hypotheses, and design studies to test their hypotheses. Then, students will conduct their studies, analyze the data, and write research papers summarizing the findings.  It is anticipated that these papers will be submitted to regional conferences.
Writing Intensive

 

PSYC 400W:  Research Seminar: Positive Approaches to Organizational Research 
4 semester hours
Bragg, Caleb

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
Students in this course will work with the instructor on organizational research utilizing positive psychology approaches. Students will become familiar with the current literature in a specific area of organizational psychology, and meet weekly to discuss research literature, develop hypotheses, and design studies to test their hypotheses. Then, students will conduct their studies, analyze the data, and write research papers summarizing their findings. 
Writing Intensive

 

PSYC 400W:  Research Seminar: Behavioral Neuroscience 
4 semester hours
Woehrle, Nancy

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.
Students in this advanced seminar will work with the instructor to perform all phases of actual, i.e. not simulated, research in behavioral neuroscience, specifically the biological underpinnings of psychiatric disorders. Students will become familiar with the current literature in a specific area of behavioral neuroscience research and meet weekly to discuss research literature, develop hypotheses, and design studies to test their hypotheses. Then, students will conduct their studies, analyze the data, and write research papers summarizing their findings. 
Writing Intensive

 

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