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Communication - Spring 2017

COMM 190 01
Public Speaking

4 Hours
Dillon, Kelly
Prerequisite: None
This course addresses basic theoretical principles of effective public speaking necessary for pluralistic audiences, concentrating on content, organization, audience analysis, ethics, language, and delivery. Students apply these principles to several oral presentations, some videotaped and requiring the use of PowerPoint.

COMM 200  1W
Introduction to Communication Studies
4 credits

Waggoner, Catherine
Pre-requisite: ENGL 101E
This course provides an introduction to the field of human communication studies and a foundation for future study within the communication discipline. The course introduces the core concepts, essential skills, and perennial issues found in several relevant contexts of human interaction, including interpersonal relationships, organizations, and cross-cultural interaction. It also examines these contexts from a theoretical perspective, suggesting how scholars have sought to formulate generalized explanations for the processes of human meaning making. Students will demonstrate their learning through written assignments, exams, and presentations. Writing intensive.

COMM 200  2W
Introduction to Communication Studies
4 credits

Broz, Stefne
Pre-requisite: ENGL 101E
This course provides an introduction to the field of human communication studies and a foundation for future study within the communication discipline. The course introduces the core concepts, essential skills, and perennial issues found in several relevant contexts of human interaction, including interpersonal relationships, organizations, and cross-cultural interaction. It also examines these contexts from a theoretical perspective, suggesting how scholars have sought to formulate generalized explanations for the processes of human meaning making. Students will demonstrate their learning through written assignments, exams, and presentations. Writing intensive.

COMM 270S 01
Interpersonal Communication

4 Hours
Broz, Stefne
Prerequisite: None
This course offers an introduction to message production and interpretation in face-to-face and other interpersonal settings. The focus of the course is to illustrate how choices in interpersonal communication behaviors are basic to our character as human beings and the nature of our interpersonal relationships. Students will complete the course having learned about basic interpersonal communication principles related to, for example, self-presentation, self-disclosure, gender, culture, effective listening, relationship development, relational maintenance, relationship dissolution, power, compliance-gaining, emotion, and conflict management.    

COMM280 01
Reasoning & Communication

4 credits
Waggoner, Catherine
Prerequisite: ENGL 101E or COMM190
This course provides extensive training in critical thinking, listening, reading, practical reasoning, deliberation, and oral and written advocacy. As part of a deliberative process, participants prepare oral and written arguments on contemporary issues for critical, well-informed audiences. Emphasis is placed on the ability to anticipate and address the wide variety of alternative perspectives represented by such audiences. Required assignments include: a personal essay regarding attitudes toward argumentation, a group research project on a current controversial issue, a roundtable performance of oral arguments with question and answer sessions, and an argumentative position paper.

COMM 290S 01
Media Literacy
4 credits

Dillon, Kelly
Pre-requisite: ENGL 101E
This course provides a broad foundation for examining the form, content, and consequences of mediated communication (including the Internet, recording, radio, television, cable, film, newspaper, and other publishing industries). The course introduces media industries from both an historical and contemporary perspective, covers the prominent theories that characterize mass media functions and effects, and addresses controversial issues in mediated communication. Students are introduced to intellectual tools that will enable them to be more critical consumers of media and given opportunities to practice applying those tools in structured classroom discussions, writing assignments, and presentations.

COMM 300Z
Social Scientific Methods

4 Hours
Warber, Katie
Prerequisites: Math Placement score 2; COMM 200 and COMM 270S, 280 or 290S.
This course introduces students to the process of conducting quantitative communication research, including how to formulate a research question, conduct library research for a literature review, select a method (e.g., experiment, content analysis, survey research), adhere to standards for scholarly writing, and critically evaluate others’ research studies. Writing intensive. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

COMM 301  1W
Critical Methods

4 credits
Cunningham, Sheryl
Pre-requisite: COMM 200 and either COMM 280 or 290S
This course is designed to foster critical analysis skills necessary for understanding a wide variety of messages, including those found in speeches, advertisements, news reports, television programs, films, and songs. In particular, students will learn and practice several methods for systematically describing, interpreting, and assessing aspects of messages. The course attends to both the theory and praxis of communication criticism; as students learn of the assumptions and approaches that undergird each method of analysis, they will have the opportunity to apply those methods in the analysis of a variety of discourses.  In doing so, they will be encouraged to engage critically with issues of culture and power in the context of communication criticism. Students will demonstrate their comprehension and apply their understanding of methods of communication criticism in exams, several written essays, and participation. Writing intensive.

COMM 325
Relational Communication

4 credits
Warber, Katie
Pre-requisites: COMM 200 and COMM 270S; or permission of instructor

This course is intended to expose students to advanced research trends and theory in the social scientific study of close relationships. Specifically, the course will focus on issues related to the nature of intimate relationships, processes, functioning, relationship issues, and communication. Topics will include mate selection, love, friendship, power, conflict, and relationship dissolution. Research on attraction, nonverbal communication, stress, sexuality, and violence will be examined. We will also focus on the nature of relationship interaction as it is associated with relationship satisfaction, distress, and mental health.

COMM 350 01
Social Media and Its Applications

4 Hours
Dillon, Kelly
Pre-requisites: COMM290S; or permission of instructor
Social media is a ubiquitous communication topic and tool. Professionals and journalists in nearly every field will have to determine its utility to connect with consumers for news dissemination or investigation, use for economic growth, or to prevent its misuse. This course aims to help students (1) acquire theoretical and practical knowledge about social media, and (2) understand the ways in which social media shape important social/cultural domains like journalism, crisis, and interpersonal communication. Students will engage in these topics through lectures, academic/journalistic readings, student presentations, film viewing, and in-class discussion, and application with community partners.

COMM 363
Environmental Communication

4 Hours
Cunningham, Sheryl
Prerequisites: COMM 200 and either 280 or 290S, or permission of instructor.
In recent years, talk about climate change has become increasingly prevalent in the public sphere, but it is important to understand that climate change is only one of many environmental issues we currently face in the United States. It is also important to understand the arguments made about the environment by various political actors including politicians, policy makers, environmental advocates, and citizens. In this course students will read a wide variety of texts that focus on environmental issues and a number of texts that focus on rhetorical theory.

Students who take this course should be prepared to develop their understanding of rhetorical theory and utilize theoretical arguments in their analyses of public discourse about the environment in class discussions, written assignments, projects and presentations.  

COMM 403
Communication Senior Seminar
4 credits
Cunningham, Sheryl; Broz, Stefne

Prerequisites: COMM 200, COMM 300, COMM 301 and senior status
This course is the capstone experience in the Communication program. Through their work on independent and group projects, students will practice research, writing, and critical thinking skills that are part of the process of conducting communication research, culminating in both written and oral presentations of results.

COMM 495
Practicum: Integrated Media Corps (IMC)
1-4 Credits
Cunningham, Sheryl
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor

COMM 499
Senior Honors Thesis/Project
0-4credits
Staff
Prerequisites: Permission

 

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