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East Asian Studies - Spring 2017

Chinese 112F
Beginning Chinese II
4 credits

Chan, Shelley
Prerequisite:  Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111. Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important. We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Chinese 130A/C
Cutting Sleeve and Sharing Peach:  Literature and Film of Homosexuality in China

4 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite: None. Taught in English.
“Homosexuality” came to China as a scientific and sexual education term in 1925, but homosexual culture has been documented since ancient times. According to scholarly studies, many emperors in pre-modern China had one or more male sex partners. Idioms and expressions signifying homosexuality exist in Chinese language, such as “Cutting Sleeve and Sharing Peach.” At the same time, however, opposition to homosexuality has also been strong among Chinese people, especially in the late Qing Dynasty and most of the 20th Century. Homosexual or LGBT activities remain largely underground due to the pressure from family and society. Not until 2001 was homosexuality removed from the official list of mental illness in The People’s Republic of China.

This course explores homosexuality in China in the context from Confucianism to the rapidly changing post-Mao society. Course materials include films, fiction and nonfiction from Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. While similarities and differences of homosexual culture in these three regions will be examined, changes in society and people’s attitude toward LGBT will also be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to understand homosexuality from an artistic point of view. A comparison between the Chinese cultural and western culture will sharpen students’ cultural sensitivity. Scholarly research on this topic will be studied as a theoretical support to the other course materials. All readings, discussions and lectures will be in English. The films will have English subtitles.

Chinese 130A/C
Chinese Women Writers:  Ancient and Modern

4 credits
Chan, Shelley
Prerequisite: None. Taught in English.
Chinese women have been known as the suppressed sex for thousands of years. Nevertheless, women’s writing has always been an important part of Chinese literature. Whereas the long history of pre-modern China produced a rather large number of women writers, the concept of “women’s literature” emerged only in the early twentieth century when enormous changes in Chinese women’s social status occurred after the May Fourth Movement of 1919. Moreover, since 1949 Communist China has witnessed further rapid changes as far as women’s writing is concerned.

This course is a general introduction to Chinese women writers in different historical periods, namely, pre-modern, modern, and contemporary. To help students understand the gender issue, it provides them with a cultural background from the Confucian patriarchy to the Maoist “equality” between the sexes, as well as a background on cultural norms toward Chinese women. It discovers women’s voice in a traditionally male-centered society and literature, examines the feminine/masculine opposition, studies how Chinese women writers have not only formed their own voice, but also often led the way in the literary development of the post-Mao period. The readings, including poetry, prose and fiction, will be buttressed by films. All readings, discussions and lectures will be in English. The movies will have English subtitles.

Chinese 212
Intermediate Chinese II

4 credits
Chen, Wan-Chen
Prerequisite: Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese. Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions. It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language. Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Chinese 330
A Study of Chinese Society II

4 credits
Chen, Wan-Chen
Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
This course is a continuation of CHIN 330: A Study of Chinese Society I. It aims at developing competence in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on tactics and skills of reading Chinese narratives to enable the students to acquaint themselves with recent developments in Chinese society. In addition to the textbook, materials from the Internet will also be used. Participants should actively engage in extensive discussion and prepare for frequent written assignments in Chinese. The course will consolidate what students have learned in the past and help them develop better reading and writing skills. In addition, the improvement of speaking and listening abilities will also be emphasized. Students should expect a steady expansion of their vocabulary and speak the language in all classroom activities.

Chinese 490
Independent Study

Tutorials for the student who has excelled in previous study of putonghua. Thematic content chosen according to student's intellectual interests.  Conducted entirely in putonghua.

Japanese 112F
Beginning Japanese II

4 credits
Imai, Terumi
Prerequisite: Japanese 111 or placement
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Japanese 212
Intermediate Japanese II

4 credits
Imai, Terumi
Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 211 or placement.
Continued development of the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

POLI 359 1W
Russian-China-US Trilateral Relations

4 credits
Yu, Bin
Prerequisite: Either POLI 102S, 205C, 210CS, or 251S, Jr class standing, RCEP or permission of instructor
The course explores issues of trilateral politics between Russia, China and the U.S. It is designed to address three learning goals: (1) understanding the interactive mode—and patterns—of triangular dynamics between Moscow, Beijing and Washington in both historical and contemporary terms; (2) critically testing and evaluating some theoretical propositions for triangle politics and its implications for international relations theories; and (3) completing a research paper on trilateral politics defined as interactions between any of the two in the triangle with a significant third-party input. Ultimately, students will learn how to do basic and original social science research by completing a total of 20 pages of research and writing assignments. The course is cross-listed for Political Science, International Studies, Russian and Central Eurasian Studies, and East Asian Studies. 10/16

RELI 134C/R 01
Chinese and Japanese Religious Traditions

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
Some Chinese and Japanese religious traditions may have familiar names: Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. Others—especially their vibrant and surprising popular traditions—permeate Chinese and Japanese cultures and affect family traditions, East Asian cuisine, literature, political structures, the work place, and even practices like feng shui and acupuncture. We will look at all these traditions, and the way that they connect to the rich cultures and histories of Japan and China. Our sources will include the great classics, personal narratives, studies by outsiders, newspaper clippings, and video clips. Course work includes exams, a short paper, and a project with the option of modified monastic living.

RELI 213R/C 01
Religion and Medicine
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None

Medicine and religion are core resources for human wellbeing, for tending body and spirit. Religion and medicine can work together to heal or be at cross purposes and cause harm; the relationship between the two is ever-changing. This course investigates the intersection and interaction of medicine and religion from a wide variety of perspectives. We will see how religious assumptions shape the way diseases like small pox are identified and mapped; we will also see how the experience of some diseases, like the plague and measles, have changed religious beliefs. From another angle, we’ll look at the work and commitments of both Buddhist and Christian medical missionaries. And from still another perspective, we’ll consider the importance of cultural and religious competence in taking medical case histories and delivering medical care. Finally, we will look at non-Western medical traditions and their religious framework, particularly that of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Overall, students will develop the capacity to identify fundamental values and assumptions about the ways our bodies, minds, and spirits work together. Course includes exams, short papers, and a research project.

RELI 333 C/R 01
Buddhist Thought and Scriptures

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
This seminar studies the teachings and practices of schools of the Buddhist tradition through close consideration of pivotal Buddhist scriptures. We will consider sutras and other texts from Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana Buddhism in their historical and cultural contexts, and within the framework of central themes and beliefs of Buddhism.  Class requirements include tests, a seminar presentations, short response papers/questions for seminar, and a term paper. Writing intensive.

 

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