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Education - Spring 2017

EDUC 103S
Sociological Perspectives in Education

4 credits
Yontz, Brian
Prerequisites: None. Every year.

An examination of the foundations of education and teaching as conceived through a sociological perspective.  The course develops theoretical and practical perspectives by considering different models for studying and analyzing social problems and by considering cases and disputes emerging from the daily practice of teaching.

More specifically, the course considers the social and institutional roles of parents, teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders in public education. Issues of class, ethnicity, and gender will be examined as they afford legal and organizational power within the institutional structure. How institutions and individuals are responsive or resistant to change is examined as well as the pressing economic and social contexts, which make change imperative. Reading in the course will revolve around specific sociological studies relating to the profession of teaching and to such social issues as school violence, social mobility, and equal opportunity. The course will have a field experience and clinical component in which students will be matched with teachers and students at a Springfield City School.  Through these experiences, students will have the opportunity to gather data and write brief case studies regarding specific social practices and responses.

Field experience of approximately 10 hours is required in grades 6 - 8. Students seeking licensure through the teacher education program are required to take either this course or Educ 104. Fulfills the General Education requirement for Social Institutions, Processes, and Behavior.

EDUC 104R
Philosophical Perspectives in Education

4 credits
Gamm, Ryan
Prerequisites: None. Every year.

We are all teachers and learners and we all are pretty good at this business of doing school or we wouldn’t be at Wittenberg. On the other hand, as we stress ourselves through the curriculum, it can be easy to lose sight of the big questions – those perplexing matters that always arise but never seem to get settled and sometimes never discussed.  One critical question is “Why do I have to learn this stuff?” And “what counts as quality work anyway?” “Who or what decides?” And finally “What makes a good teacher or a good student?” “Is it possible to be a good teacher but a bad person?”

This is an education philosophy course that takes these essential questions seriously. And we do it by reading the works of people who have thought about the questions seriously – Plato, Rousseau, and Dewey. We also approach the questions through fiction and film, through the stories of people whose lives have been altered by encountering a transforming student, teacher, and experience. Finally, since book learning is never enough, as a class we will take up the challenge ourselves of being teachers – mentoring and interacting with students from a school in Springfield. One final dear question – “Can we learn to be more caring and compassionate, more open to the plight and pain of others different from ourselves?” This fieldwork and these works and our discussions will lead us down this road of contemplation or after all, “Of what use is all this schooling stuff anyway?”

Field experience of approximately 10 hours is required in grades 6 – 8. Students seeking licensure through the teacher education program are required to take either this course or Educ 103. Fulfills the General Education requirement for Religious and Philosophical Inquiry.

EDUC 105
Educational Psychology

2 credits
Broidy, Stefan; Linder, Roberta
Prerequisites: None, but concurrent registration in Educ 105. Every year.
This course is designed for students intending to major or minor in education or similar disciplines. In this courses students will identify and articulate key learning and cognitive process theories around how learning occurs and how learners construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop habits of mind. In addition, students will identify and articulate the theoretical foundations about human motivation and behavior. Likewise, students will identify and articulate an understanding of the major components of classroom planning, management, and instruction that have been addressed in the study of the teaching/learning process as well as how these general techniques can be modified to address individual differences. Finally students will be able to describe various educational research methods and apply this knowledge to evaluate educational research studies. 

EDUC 120
Introduction to Students with Special Needs

2 credits
Fisher, Cynthia
Prerequisites: None, but concurrent registration in Educ 120. Every year.
An examination of how schools and society respond to students who have special needs including students with disabilities, students who are alienated from school, and students whose linguistic or cultural backgrounds differ from mainstream society.  The course focuses on disability as the context for examining student diversity and the schools.

The course provides an overview of legislative mandates relating to students with disabilities, of teacher roles for identifying and referring students, of educational programming options available, and of approaches for creating more inclusive school environments.  The course challenges prospective teachers to make connections between what is known about human development and diversity and what is believed about human dignity and the purposes of American education and about what is known about current educational practices and what is possible in terms of educational vision.

Field experience of 5 hours with students or adults with disabilities is required.

EDUC 203W
Early Childhood Development & Education

3 credits
Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisites:  EDUC 105 or instructor permission. Concurrent registration with EDUC 204 is required.
The course focuses on the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of children from birth through 8 years old. Emphasis is placed on the interactions of nature and environment that help to explain the wide range of diversity of students at age levels. This course explores the historical, philosophical, psychological and social foundations of early childhood education as they relate to present day practice. Developmentally appropriate practice in program design and implementation, authentic assessment, family involvement and the professional role of child advocate define the template applied to the exploration of a variety of early childhood programs. Course work includes attention to technology as a tool for instruction, assessment and communication. The course examines social issues, changing views of early childhood, new findings in brain development, the critical importance of learning in the early years, and factors that impact early learning. Students use local, state and national curricular guidelines to design developmentally appropriate instruction and learning experiences and safe and healthy learning environments (e.g. childhood illnesses, communicable diseases). Students design strategies for observing, interpreting and presenting formative and summative assessment data related to the young child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical growth and development. The importance of family involvement including sensitivity to family structures and assistance to families in need, and professional roles (including advocacy for the needs of young children and collaboration with appropriate agencies), are stressed. In addition, procedures concerning the administration, organization, and operation of early childhood programs are addressed. This course is writing intensive.

EDUC 204
Practicum I: Early Childhood

1 credit
Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration with EDUC 203 is required. Every semester.
This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of best practices for teaching in the early childhood classroom. Students will engage in preschool classroom observations, student interviews, small group work, co-teaching, and developmentally appropriate whole group teaching and assessment. Performance in the practicum will be observed and evaluated with formative feedback being provided throughout the semester by the course instructor. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC 213W
Adolescent Development and Education

3 credits
McGuffey, Amy
Prerequisite: EDUC 105 or instructor permission. Concurrent registration with EDUC 214 is required.
The course focuses on the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of young adolescents and adolescents from approximately ages 9-18.  Emphasis is placed on the interactions of nature and environment that help to explain the wide range of diversity of students at age levels.  This course explores the historical, philosophical, psychological and social foundations of adolescence as a developmental phase, providing a basis for the educational topics of the course focusing on teaching, planning, and the particular curricular and instructional demands of the high school setting. Specific areas to be examined are structures and personnel of secondary schools, classroom management, assessment, unit planning, lesson planning, and developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant instruction. Short-range and long-term planning is thoroughly investigated and formally integrated through the examination of local, state, and national curricular guidelines, high school texts, and state-mandated testing requirements.

EDUC 214
Practicum: Middle/Secondary
1 credit
Yontz, Brian
Prerequisite:  Concurrent registration with EDUC 213 is required.

This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of best practices for teaching in middle school or high school classrooms. Students will engage in classroom observations, administrator and teacher interviews, analyses of curricula and textbooks, and developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant whole group teaching and assessment. Performance in the practicum will be observed and evaluated with formative feedback being provided throughout the semester by the course instructor. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC 253
Phonics for Reading and Writing

3 credits
Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 254 Practicum II.
This course introduces students to the developmental nature of reading and writing with an emphasis on the importance of decoding in relation to fluency and comprehension. The course focuses on the related cueing systems that children use as they read a text: graphophonic, syntactic, and semantic. Students will learn about the key concepts of reading (i.e., concepts of print, phonological/phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, phonics, morphology) and orthography (i.e., alphabet, pattern, meaning). Students will demonstrate that they are able to explain and give examples of the principles necessary to teach readers to use phonics and structural analysis to unlock unknown words in text.  They will learn how to teach phonics and other decoding strategies using a range of materials and instructional methods that enable children to hear sounds and make the speech-print connection. Students will also begin to develop an understanding of the assess-evaluate-plan-teach cycle as it relates to reading and writing instruction.

EDUC 254
Practicum II: Early Childhood

1 credit
Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in EDUC 253. Every semester.
This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of best practices for teaching phonics-based reading and writing in selected local schools. Throughout the semester, students will be conducting observations, administering phonics assessments, and implementing phonics-based small group/whole group reading and writing lessons in K-3 classrooms. The course instructor will be observing and evaluating students’ performance, providing formative feedback throughout the semester. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC
312 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas

3 credits
Linder, Roberta
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in EDUC 313
This class provides preparation for teaching literacy in middle school, high school, and multi-age classrooms. The focus is on planning, selecting, and using research-based strategies for literacy instruction and assessment, and creating a literate environment in content-area classrooms. Students become increasingly knowledgeable about their content standards and professional resources for their disciplines. Strategies for disciplinary reading, vocabulary instruction, questioning/discussion skills, and writing are emphasized. This is also a writing intensive course.

EDUC 313
Literacy Practicum
1 credit
Linder, Roberta
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in EDUC 312.

This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of disciplinary literacy practices in selected local schools.  Throughout the semester, students will be conducting observations, writing content area lessons, and implementing small group/whole group lessons in grades 7-12 classrooms. The content area lessons will incorporate practices that provide support for students in comprehending texts, discussing, writing, or understanding academic vocabulary. The course instructor will be observing and evaluating students’ performance and providing formative feedback throughout the semester. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC 321
Integrated Math and Science Methods K-3
6 credits

Post, Regina; Gamm, Ryan
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education, completion of or concurrent enrollment in Math 119. Every semester.

This course is designed for education majors seeking licensure in early childhood and/or intervention specialist. In this course teacher candidates will examine the principles, methods, and materials used to help young learners develop an understanding of mathematics and science in the early childhood classroom. Specifically, local, state, and national curricular standards and guidelines are used to design instruction and assessment using a variety of methods. Topics will include the integration of mathematics and science learning and instruction, scientific inquiry and discovery learning, cognitively guided instruction, problem based learning, differentiation, the development of numeracy and a numerate society, the relationship between the physical world and the living environment, thematic learning, issues in health and fitness, and use of technology today. Instruction is also provided in selecting and using a variety of instructional media, resources, and technology specific to both fields.

EDUC 322
Practicum III: EC Math & Science

1 credit
Gamm, Ryan
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration with EDUC 321. Every semester.
This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of best practices for teaching mathematics and science in selected local schools. Throughout the semester, teacher candidates will engage in K-3 classroom observations, student interviews, small group work, co-teaching, and whole group teaching and assessment related to the math and science curriculum. The course instructor will observe and evaluate teacher candidates’ performance in the practicum, and will provide formative feedback throughout the semester. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC 323W
Integrated Literacy & Social Studies Methods
6 credits
McGuffey, Amy; Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education; concurrent registration with EDUC 324. Every semester.

An examination of the principles, methods, and materials used to help young learners develop an understanding of literacy and social studies in the early childhood classroom.  Specifically, local, state, and national curricular standards and guidelines are used to design instruction and prepare a variety of methods for assessing student understanding. Topics include the multiple components of reading including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, word study and comprehension and the creation of a knowledge base and understanding of strategies for integrating instruction in reading, writing and the other language arts with Social Studies. In addition, students will develop skill in constructing tasks that engage pre-K-3 students in exploring, creating, and connecting to the past, present, and future. Integrated activities are designed to include American heritage, people in societies, world interactions, decision-making and resources, democratic processes, and citizenship rights and responsibilities. Instruction is also provided in selecting and using a variety of instructional media, resources, and technology specific to both fields. This course is writing intensive.

EDUC  324
Practicum IV: Early Childhood Literacy
1 credit
Schulz, Melissa
Prerequisite: Concurrent registration with EDUC 323. Every semester.

This is a field-based course that provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of best practices for the literacy instruction. Students will engage in K-3 classroom observations, student interviews, small-guided reading lessons, co-teaching, and whole group teaching and assessment related to literacy. Performance in the practicum will be observed and evaluated with formative feedback being provided throughout the semester by the course instructor. Practicum class will meet periodically throughout the semester for instructional and reflective discussions.

EDUC 343
The Inclusive Classroom PreK-3
1 credit
McGuffey, Amy

Prerequisites: Admit to the Teacher Licensure program. Concurrent registration in 321 is required.  Course will be offered every semester.
This course is designed for prospective early childhood and dual intervention specialist education educators. The course builds on information presented in EDUC 120 and provides prospective teachers with the knowledge and skills for identifying and accommodating students with special learning needs in general education and inclusive settings.  The course examines characteristics of students with special learning needs, provides a rationale for needs-based decision making, and teacher roles on intervention assistance teams and multidisciplinary IEP planning teams, and intervention-based evaluation procedures.  In addition this course would address the multi-tiered process of response to intervention. The course addresses the rights and expectations in the referral, evaluation, and intervention process.   Skills for promoting parental involvement, collaborative problem solving, team planning, and co-teaching are also addressed as are skills for promoting inclusive environments on a school-wide basis. Field components are connected to the practicum EDUC 322.

EDUC 344
Inclusive Practices for Students
1 credit
Linder, Roberta
Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Licensure program. Concurrent registration in 323 is required.  Course will be offered every semester.

This course is designed for prospective early childhood and dual intervention specialist educators. The course builds on information presented in EDUC 120 and provides prospective teachers with the knowledge and skills for designing and implementing individualized instruction to increase meaningful engagement of all students in instruction. The course addresses making individualized accommodations and use of technology to support  instruction for students with identified learning needs. In addition, the course explores promoting self esteem and social interaction for students in inclusive settings. Field components are connected to the practicum 324.

EDUC 442
Mathematics in the Upper Elementary Grades.
2 credits
Staff

Prerequisites: EDUC 303 (for ECE Generalist Endorsement) EDUC 304 & 305 (for MC Generalist Endorsement)
This course provides an overview of the Mathematics content and curriculum found in Ohio’s 4th-6th grade classrooms. Specific topics will include, mathematical processes, number sense and numeration, algebraic concepts, informal geometry and measurement, and data organization and interpretation. Special attention is focused on developmentally appropriate pedagogy.

EDUC 490
Independent Study
Variable
Staff

EDUC 492
Internship
Variable
Staff

EDUC 495
Student Teaching
Variable
Nicol, Robbin

EDUC 496
Student Teaching Seminar
2 credits
Yontz, Brian; McGuffey, Amy; Gamm, Ryan

This course is designed as a capstone experience for students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate their preparation as a teacher while completing their student teaching. This course will require students to reflect and consider their identity as a leader for constructive social change in light of national, state, and institutional standards. A special focus will be placed on students’ development as it relates to Wittenberg Education Department’s conceptual framework. In addition, students will gain practical knowledge and experience on searching for a job and participating in an interview. All students will be expected to produce a professional portfolio that will help them transition from teacher candidacy into professional life. Concurrent registration with EDUC 495 is required.

EDUC 499
Honors Thesis / Project

Variable
Staff

MASTER OF ARTS COURSES

EDUC 512
Leadership for Student Learning and Development

3 credits
Staff
The course is designed for participants to articulate a school-wide vision for student learning and achievement.  Participants will acquire the knowledge, skills and understanding to provide purpose and direction to the articulation of a school vision for learning and achievement.

EDUC 526
Supervision and Instructional Leadership

3 credits
Staff
With changes in licensure levels and teacher evaluation methods, the intent and scope of quality teacher supervision is critically important. This course will help candidates examine their strengths/weaknesses with regard to the skills/procedures the literature suggests are central to supervision, observation, and evaluation.

EDUC 530
Planning and Implementing Professional Learning

3 credits
Linder, Roberta
In this course, teachers will learn about the characteristics of effective teacher leadership, different models of professional learning, and strategies for designing teacher-led professional growth. Participants will select one of the models and design a personal or group professional learning plan that will be implemented.

EDUC 536
History of Literacy: Policy & Politics

3 credits
Staff
In this course, the candidates will examine the history and politics leading up to the current issues facing literacy educators. Candidates will engage in activities that add to their knowledge base related to literacy history, policy, and issues and will prepare them to take action on a personally relevant issue.

EDUC 581
Teacher Leader Internship I

3 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director.
This site-based experience allows students to synthesize and apply skills and knowledge gained during their graduate studies and from their wisdom of practice. Candidates will assume increasingly complex leadership responsibilities according to the key experiences needed for a school-based leader.

 

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