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History - Spring 2017

HIST 105 C/H 01
Pre-Modern World History

4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite: none.
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 106C/H 01 and 02
Modern World

4.00 credits
Hume, Brad
Prerequisite: none.
How did the world we live in today—its political boundaries, economic systems, imbalances of wealth and power, ethnic and religious conflicts, and interwoven cultures—come to be? This course attempts to answer that question by investigating the history of the world from 1400 to the present. We will focus on key events and turning points as well as the movements of technology, ideas, and people that have made possible today’s globalized, interconnected human and material world. Using recent books by historians as well as primary sources created by people who lived in the past—including speeches, manifestos, memoirs, diaries, laws, maps, cartoons, paintings, photographs, newspaper advertisements, songs, films, poetry, architecture, and material culture—we will explore the intertwined social, cultural, political, and economic history of the modern world. This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.

HIST 111H 01
Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite: First Year Students ONLY – Supplemental Instruction will be available.
Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades…these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 111H 02
Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite: none.
Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades…these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

HIST 121H 01/02
United States History I

4.00 credits
Staff
An introduction to U.S. history from pre-1492 through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. Using a mix of recent books by historians and primary sources created by people who lived during the era--including speeches, sermons, memoirs, diaries, laws, maps, cartoons, paintings, photographs, newspaper advertisements, popular songs, architecture, and material culture--we will explore the social, cultural, political, and economic history of early America. Not writing intensive. Assessment will focus on the students’ ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.

HIST 127H 01 and 02
The United States since 1945

4.00 credits
Wood, Molly
Prerequisite: none.
In 1945, as World War II ended, a new ideological conflict engulfed the world. The “Cold War” would dominate U.S. history and international relations for the next five decades. This class will explore how and why the Cold War began, how it shaped U.S. foreign and domestic policy, how and why it ended and how the U.S. has engaged with the rest of the world since it ended. We will assess U.S. relationships with other areas of the world as well as the important social, political and economic changes taking place at home in the post-war era. We will explore both broad questions (Why do we remember the 1950s as a time of domestic tranquility? How do we assess the social disruptions and activism of the 1960s?) and specific questions (What was Watergate? What happened during the Iranian Hostage crisis?) This class will give students the opportunity to examine recent U.S. history in detail, to place U.S. history in a larger global context, and to learn basic skills of historical analysis. The course will consist of lecture, class discussion and reading and writing assignments. Attendance is required. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, and the timely completion of all assignments.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 130H 1W
African American History
4.00 Credits

Rosenberg, Scott
Prerequisite: none.
This course will investigate African-American history by focusing on slavery and the struggle for equality after emancipation. The first part of the course will examine the institution of slavery, however, greater emphasis will be placed on the lives that slaves made for themselves. We will ask questions such as “how much control did slaves have over their own lives,” and “how did they resist servitude?” The second half of the course will dedicate itself to the study of the struggle for equality. This class will move beyond the political struggle and will explore the role that culture and an emerging and evolving identity played in shaping the quest for equality. Assessment will focus on the student’s ability to express ideas in take-home essay exams, papers, and oral presentation. Grading will be based on discussions of a variety of readings, 3-4 papers and a take-home midterm and final.

HIST173C 1W
Settlers and Liberators of South Africa

4.00 Credits
Rosenberg, Scott
Prerequisite: none
This course will focus on conflict in South Africa from a historical perspective. We will consider the nature of the European colonial societies and the Africans who resisted them. Africans fought not only against a range of inequalities, but in their creative resuscitation of a suppressed past, fought over descriptive languages, social and cultural categories that are themselves the product of domination. Africans used passive, hidden, and violent methods to overcome a variety of difficulties in achieving independence and survival. Readings will include novels, biographies, and a few manuscripts. Students will be evaluated on class participation, take-home exams, and papers based upon the readings. Writing intensive.

HIST204 1W
Modern American Presidency

4.00 Credits
Wood, Molly
Prerequisite: none
History 204 is the sophomore-level methods class required of all History majors at Wittenberg. The primary goal of the class is to teach students the core skills required for a historian – chiefly how to write and understand historiography and how to organize, plan, research and write a research paper. We will do this all arranged around a particular topic, in this case – “The Modern American Presidency.” The class will read numerous primary and secondary sources to explore selected 20th or 21st century American Presidents, First Ladies, and Presidential Administrations.  Students will discuss and analyze those sources, compare the secondary sources for historiography papers, and then write an original research paper based on primary sources but also situating a chosen topic and argument within the larger historiography. Clearly, this is a writing and reading intensive class that will demand a good portion of your time and attention during the semester. Completing it successfully will be an important step on the road to being an active critical thinker and a practicing historian.

HIST210C 1W
Mummies, Myths, and Monuments of Egypt

4.00 Credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite: none.
Ancient Egypt is a subject that fascinates the American imagination. This course will consider the American discovery of Egypt through the work of famous archaeologists and historians. With this foundation, we will examine the over 3,000 years of history that shape what is known of ancient Egypt from the great pyramid builders of the Old Kingdom, to the great poets of the Middle Kingdom, to the great apex of Egyptian power under the pharaohs of the New Kingdom. The course will conclude with an examination of the last century of Egyptian history under the invading empires of the Kushites, the Persians, and the Greeks. This is a survey class that will require intensive reading in both primary (both textual and artifactual evidence) and secondary sources on Egypt. Writing Intensive.

HIST240H 1W
Medieval England

4.00 Credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite:  None
From the grubby peasant to men in tights to corpulent kings, images of “Merrie Olde England” abound in popular culture. This course will examine the history of England from the time of King Arthur through the fourteenth century (roughly 500-1400 AD). Modern interpretations will be paired with medieval sources to examine the authenticity of their depiction of England’s medieval centuries. Students will be expected to master the history of medieval England, but also to sharpen and develop their critical thinking skills as they interact with popular depictions, the interpretations of scholars and the voices of medieval people. As a writing intensive course, assignments will be sequenced to help students develop their writing skills. Modes of evaluation will include, quizzes, essay exams, papers and class discussions. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 251C/H 1W
Medieval Russia

4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite: none.
Russia occupies a unique position between Europe and Asia. This class will explore the creation of the Russian state, and the foundation of the question of is Russia European or Asian? We will begin with the exploration and settlement of the Vikings in Eastern Europe, which began the genesis of the state known as “Rus’.” That state was integrated into the larger medieval world through a variety of means, from Christianization, to dynastic marriage, and economic ties. However, over the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the creation of the crusading ideal and the arrival of the Mongols began the process of separating Rus’ (becoming Russia) from the rest of Europe. This continued with the creation of power centers in NE Russia, and the transition of the idea of empire from Byzantium at its fall to Muscovy. This story of medieval Russia is a unique one that impacts both the traditional history of medieval Europe, as well as the birth of the first Eurasian empire. Writing Intensive. Counts for RCEP/PAST Programs.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST306 1W.
Byzantium
4.00 Credits

Raffensperger, Christian and Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite:  One course in History or Permission.
Welcome to the survey of the history of Byzantium. As an archaeologist and a historian, we have designed this course with an eye to establishing a visual and textual history of the the Byzantine empire through the analysis of documentary, historical (Procopius, Anna Comnena, John of Nikiou) and artifactual (visual culture found in archaeological records and museum collections) evidence. We will establish a chronology for the major events and visual markers with which we might reconstruct.  Particular attention is given to non-traditional divisions of looking at this 1000 year old empire. We will assess how regional differences created a variety of approaches to Byzantine life and culture. Readings from the ancient world will frame how we consider the concerns of ancient authors and how they recorded the history of their own times in art and writing. Discussions will require some knowledge of Biblical themes, and a willingness to discuss faith, lived religion and devotion. This course is writing intensive and may count toward the interdisciplinary Pre-Modern and Ancient World Studies (PAST) minor and Africana Studies.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 411 1W
Senior Seminar

4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, D.
Prerequisite: Senior history majors only and HIST 202, 203 and eight hours of 300 Level History Courses.
This capstone to your history experience allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of historical method, historiography, and research skills. You will research and write a long paper based on previous historical coursework, present that research in an oral presentation, and engage in discussions with other students about the nature and practice of history. Papers, small assignments, tests, and in-class discussion constitute the graded coursework. Writing intensive.

HIST 490 00
Independent Study

1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Permission only.

HIST 499 00
Senior Honors Thesis

0.00-8.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Permission only.

 

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