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International Studies - Spring 2017

AFDS 201
Intro to Africana and Diaspora Studies

4 credits
Rosenberg, Scott
This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Africana Studies, which is the study, interpretation, and dissemination of knowledge concerning African-American, African, and Caribbean affairs and culture. Our chief aim is to look at the arts and culture of people of African descent with specific attention at the retention of Africanisms in New World Contexts. As such, we will devote attention to music, dance, religion, and literature as ways of influencing and creating space for voice, inclusion, and identity in New World contexts. We will further investigate the transformation of these themes over the last 500 hundred years as Africans, African Americans and African Caribbeans have been exposed to European domination and exploitation.

AFDS 270C 01
Lesotho Nutrition

2 Credits
Rosenberg, Scott
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor required.

ART 120H  1W
Art History II

4 credit hours
Gimenez-Berger, Alejandra
No prerequisite
Art 120H offers a selective chronological survey of the arts of the Western world from the Renaissance through the Modern period. This course traces the development of the pictorial traditions of the West by concentrating on the major artists and movements, beginning with the resurgence of classical antiquity in the Italian Renaissance, and culminating with the break from that tradition and the radical innovations of the 20th century. The art of this period will be discussed in relation to historical circumstances and the original context of the work.

BUSN 250C
International Business

4 credit hours
Jeong, Seonhee
Introduction to the broad area of international business. The social, economic and political environments of the multinational firm form the base on which the management structure, marketing processes and financing of the global corporation are studied. Every year.

BUSN 290
Global Social Entrepreneurship

4 credit hours
Jeong, Seonhee
The world has changed in fundamental ways over the last few years ­ as the challenges have become more complex and intractable. An increasingly popular solution to global social problems lies in the field of social entrepreneurship and global leadership, in which business and nonprofit (or NGO) leaders design, grow, and lead social enterprises. With the traditional lines between for-profit enterprise, nonprofit enterprise, and government beginning to blur, it is critical that students understand this emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of social entrepreneurship. This class highlights how social enterprises and challenges in East Asia differ from that of Western European and American. Students will work on social venture business plan in this class. Every year.

Chinese 130A/C
Chinese Women Writers:  Ancient and Modern

4 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite: None. Taught in English.
Chinese women have been known as the suppressed sex for thousands of years. Nevertheless, women’s writing has always been an important part of Chinese literature. Whereas the long history of pre-modern China produced a rather large number of women writers, the concept of “women’s literature” emerged only in the early twentieth century when enormous changes in Chinese women’s social status occurred after the May Fourth Movement of 1919. Moreover, since 1949 Communist China has witnessed further rapid changes as far as women’s writing is concerned.

This course is a general introduction to Chinese women writers in different historical periods, namely, pre-modern, modern, and contemporary. To help students understand the gender issue, it provides them with a cultural background from the Confucian patriarchy to the Maoist “equality” between the sexes, as well as a background on cultural norms toward Chinese women. It discovers women’s voice in a traditionally male-centered society and literature, examines the feminine/masculine opposition, studies how Chinese women writers have not only formed their own voice, but also often led the way in the literary development of the post-Mao period. The readings, including poetry, prose and fiction, will be buttressed by films. All readings, discussions and lectures will be in English. The movies will have English subtitles.

Chinese 330
A Study of Chinese Society II

4 credits
Chen, Wan-Chen

Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
This course is a continuation of CHIN 330: A Study of Chinese Society I. It aims at developing competence in advanced Chinese with an emphasis on tactics and skills of reading Chinese narratives to enable the students to acquaint themselves with recent developments in Chinese society. In addition to the textbook, materials from the Internet will also be used. Participants should actively engage in extensive discussion and prepare for frequent written assignments in Chinese. The course will consolidate what students have learned in the past and help them develop better reading and writing skills. In addition, the improvement of speaking and listening abilities will also be emphasized. Students should expect a steady expansion of their vocabulary and speak the language in all classroom activities.

ECON 190S
Principles of Economics

4 credits
Wishart, David; Gwinn, Lawrence; Tiffany, Fred
Prerequisite: Math Placement Level 22 or 2 recommended
Introduction to basic principles of economics. Topics covered include supply and demand, marginal analysis, perfect competition, profit maximization, aggregate demand and supply, the level of employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and international trade. Every year.

ECON 231
European Economic History

4 credits
Wishart, David
Prerequisites: Economics 190
Examination of the evolution of capitalism in Europe from the 15th century to the present, the impact of European capitalism on economies and societies in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise and demise of centrally planned state socialist economies in Russian and the Eastern European countries, and the prospects for European economic integration. Topics presented in this course emphasize the use of principles of economics to understand historical change and the methods of empirical analysis that are commonly used by economic historians. Writing intensive. Alternate years.

ENGL 190A/C
Sorcery, Shape Shifters, and Spirit Children: Magical Realism, Fabulism, and the African Novel
4 credits
MacDonald, Ian

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Many African novels have traditionally fallen into camps that can generally be described as realist or fabulist. The former tradition typically follows the script of the realist novel. Protagonists navigate their internal emotional responses to complex political atmospheres in the colonial regimes which controlled much of the continent until the 1970s or the realities of independence as well as the frequently failed promises of the new political class. The other broad tradition peppers the “real world” with the uncanny: spirits and charms related to pre-colonial orature. These are worlds in which magic often reflects an allegory of political critique. This course will focus on key texts from this latter tradition. We will investigate the larger history of the colonial project in several regions of Africa and the individual traditions and post-independence trials of the modern states emerging from that history, tracing the mythic architecture that informs the magical worlds the authors create as well as issues surrounding race, nationality, systems of inclusion, problematics of reading and readership, and the ever-present threat of exotification relevant to the individual modern African states in which the literature was produced. Writing intensive.

German 140A:  Magic Realism in German Literature
4 credits
Bennett, Timothy
Prerequisite: None. Taught in English
Though frequently associated with Latin American literature, the term “magic realism” first appeared in the title of Franz Roh’s 1925 study of German post-expressionist painting and its parallels in other forms of art, including literature:   Nach-Expressionismus: Magischer Realismus. Magic Realism in German literature refers not to a movement but to a style of writing that rejects the excesses of expressionism and the scientific determinism of naturalism. Instead, these writers strive for a sober, often classical clarity in their narrative depiction of the world. At the same time, their narratives may incorporate fantastic elements as they suggest a poetic or cosmic unity underlying the mundane world of appearance.

The course will consider works by Ernst Jünger and Hermann Hesse which anticipate futuristic themes of science or speculative fiction, Christa Wolf’s exploration of a sort of dissident socialist magic realism, Patrick Süskind’s bizarre tale of a serial killer, and works by contemporary author Daniel Kehlmann that hint at a truer reality which occasionally illuminates our world.

Students should expect to read extensively and intensively and to participate regularly in class discussions. Student progress will be assessed primarily through short writing assignments and examinations.

All readings and assignments are in English. No German is required. Eligible students may also integrate a Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) module into their work for the class.

HIST 105 C/H 01
Pre-Modern World History

4 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite: none.
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 106C/H 01 and 02
Modern World

4 credits
Hume, Brad
Prerequisite: none.
How did the world we live in today—its political boundaries, economic systems, imbalances of wealth and power, ethnic and religious conflicts, and interwoven cultures—come to be? This course attempts to answer that question by investigating the history of the world from 1400 to the present. We will focus on key events and turning points as well as the movements of technology, ideas, and people that have made possible today’s globalized, interconnected human and material world. Using recent books by historians as well as primary sources created by people who lived in the past—including speeches, manifestos, memoirs, diaries, laws, maps, cartoons, paintings, photographs, newspaper advertisements, songs, films, poetry, architecture, and material culture—we will explore the intertwined social, cultural, political, and economic history of the modern world. This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.

HIST 111H 01
Medieval Europe
4 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite: First Year Students ONLY – Supplemental Instruction will be available.
Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades…these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 111H 02
Medieval Europe
4 credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite: none.

Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades...these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

HIST 130H 1W
African American History

4 Credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite: none.
This course will investigate African-American history by focusing on slavery and the struggle for equality after emancipation. The first part of the course will examine the institution of slavery, however, greater emphasis will be placed on the lives that slaves made for themselves. We will ask questions such as “how much control did slaves have over their own lives,” and “how did they resist servitude?” The second half of the course will dedicate itself to the study of the struggle for equality. This class will move beyond the political struggle and will explore the role that culture and an emerging and evolving identity played in shaping the quest for equality. Assessment will focus on the student’s ability to express ideas in take-home essay exams, papers, and oral presentation. Grading will be based on discussions of a variety of readings, 3-4 papers and a take-home midterm and final.  

HIST173C 1W
Settlers and Liberators of South Africa
4 Credits

Rosenberg, Scott
Prerequisite: none
This course will focus on conflict in South Africa from a historical perspective. We will consider the nature of the European colonial societies and the Africans who resisted them. Africans fought not only against a range of inequalities, but in their creative resuscitation of a suppressed past, fought over descriptive languages, social and cultural categories that are themselves the product of domination. Africans used passive, hidden, and violent methods to overcome a variety of difficulties in achieving independence and survival. Readings will include novels, biographies, and a few manuscripts. Students will be evaluated on class participation, take-home exams, and papers based upon the readings. Writing intensive.

HIST210C 1W
Mummies, Myths, and Monuments of Egypt

4 Credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite: none.
Ancient Egypt is a subject that fascinates the American imagination. This course will consider the American discovery of Egypt through the work of famous archaeologists and historians. With this foundation, we will examine the over 3,000 years of history that shape what is known of ancient Egypt from the great pyramid builders of the Old Kingdom, to the great poets of the Middle Kingdom, to the great apex of Egyptian power under the pharaohs of the New Kingdom. The course will conclude with an examination of the last century of Egyptian history under the invading empires of the Kushites, the Persians, and the Greeks. This is a survey class that will require intensive reading in both primary (both textual and artifactual evidence) and secondary sources on Egypt. Writing Intensive.

HIST240H  1W
Medieval England

4 Credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite: None
From the grubby peasant to men in tights to corpulent kings, images of “Merrie Olde England” abound in popular culture. This course will examine the history of England from the time of King Arthur through the fourteenth century (roughly 500-1400 AD). Modern interpretations will be paired with medieval sources to examine the authenticity of their depiction of England’s medieval centuries. Students will be expected to master the history of medieval England, but also to sharpen and develop their critical thinking skills as they interact with popular depictions, the interpretations of scholars and the voices of medieval people. As a writing intensive course, assignments will be sequenced to help students develop their writing skills. Modes of evaluation will include, quizzes, essay exams, papers and class discussions. This course counts toward the PAST minor.   

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 251C/H 1W
Medieval Russia

4 credits
Raffensperger, Christian

Prerequisite: none.
Russia occupies a unique position between Europe and Asia. This class will explore the creation of the Russian state, and the foundation of the question of is Russia European or Asian? We will begin with the exploration and settlement of the Vikings in Eastern Europe, which began the genesis of the state known as “Rus’.” That state was integrated into the larger medieval world through a variety of means, from Christianization, to dynastic marriage, and economic ties. However, over the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the creation of the crusading ideal and the arrival of the Mongols began the process of separating Rus’ (becoming Russia) from the rest of Europe. This continued with the creation of power centers in NE Russia, and the transition of the idea of empire from Byzantium at its fall to Muscovy. This story of medieval Russia is a unique one that impacts both the traditional history of medieval Europe, as well as the birth of the first Eurasian empire. Writing Intensive. Counts for RCEP/PAST Programs

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST306 1W
Byzantium

4 Credits
Raffensperger, Christian; Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite: One course in History or Permission.
Welcome to the survey of the history of Byzantium. As an archaeologist and a historian, we have designed this course with an eye to establishing a visual and textual history of the the Byzantine empire through the analysis of documentary, historical (Procopius, Anna Comnena, John of Nikiou) and artifactual (visual culture found in archaeological records and museum collections) evidence. We will establish a chronology for the major events and visual markers with which we might reconstruct. Particular attention is given to non-traditional divisions of looking at this 1000 year old empire. We will assess how regional differences created a variety of approaches to Byzantine life and culture. Readings from the ancient world will frame how we consider the concerns of ancient authors and how they recorded the history of their own times in art and writing. Discussions will require some knowledge of Biblical themes, and a willingness to discuss faith, lived religion and devotion. This course is writing intensive and may count toward the interdisciplinary Pre-Modern and Ancient World Studies (PAST) minor and Africana Studies.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

PHIL 380R 1W
Topic: Global Health Justice

4 Credits
McHugh, Nancy
Prerequisite: None.
In Global Health Justice we will be studying the role of justice in its relationship to health issues in the developing world and in the U.S.. The goals of the course are: 1. To critically interrogate theories of justice and their applicability to health and medicine. 2. To develop a cross-cultural and intercultural examination of health, medicine and the effects of development, globalization, poverty and affluence on health. 

This course will be taught as an Inside-Out class. Inside-Out classes consist typically of 12-15 outside students, college students living on the outside, and 12-15 inside students, college students who are incarcerated and living on the inside of a prison. Inside and outside students sit side by side in a circle in the classroom, engaged in all of the same readings, all of the same papers, all equally graded. This is the sixth Inside-Out course at Wittenberg. Each one has been a fantastic learning experience for the students and me. We will travel as a group weekly to have class at London Correctional Institute.

By the end of the semester students should be able to:

  1. Critically assess, appreciate and understand a variety of theories of justice and their relationship to each other and to global health.
  2. Understand and apply theories of justice to address and respond to global, national and local instances of health injustice.
  3. Recognize and assess the ways in which humans are immersed in social systems and the ways these facilitate or diminish opportunities for health justice.
  4. Develop an understanding of cultural differences in health needs.
  5. Understand the impact of globalization on the health of people in developing countries, with a focus on countries in Africa and South East Asia, as well as countries that fall in the liminal space between what we label the developing world and the developed world.
  6. Understand the impacts of poverty and class on the health of people in the “developed” world.
  7. Argue a philosophical point effectively and with confidence.
  8. Apply case-based reasoning to study specific instances of health justice.

Students will be assessed through weekly reaction papers that ask them to focus on different aspects of argumentation, such as identifying theses, premises, developing counter arguments. Students will also complete a project on health needs in their community and a project on global health needs with the goal of identifying needs and developing recommendations.

POLI 234S 01
Black Politics

4 credits
Young, John
This course will introduce students to the nature of black politics and black political behavior.  The course will inquire into the political dimensions of black life in America and how Black Americans have interpreted and responded to the democratic experiment.  Considerable attention will be given to how individuals, institutions, and protest movements have shaped black political consciousness and black political participation.  Finally, the course will examine the relative impact of black protest politics versus black electoral politics in addressing black political demands. Evaluation will be based on three exams, several quizzes, class participation, and short, one page writing assignments. 10/16

POLI 251S 01
International Relations

4 credits
Yu, Bin
This course begins with an overview of the evolution of international system. This is followed by the discussion of some key theoretical concepts and approaches in the study of international relations (IR). Students will then apply IR history and theories to analyze some major issues in the 21st century, including international security, international political economy, nationalism, democratization, and global governance. The course has a lecture/discussion format. There will be a mid-term, a final exam, one short take-home paper, and a few quizzes. 10/16

POLI 359 1W
Russian-China-US Trilateral Relations

4 credits
Yu, Bin
Prerequesite: Either POLI 102S, 205C, 210CS, or 251S, Jr class standing, RCEP or permission of instructor
The course explores issues of trilateral politics between Russia, China and the U.S. It is designed to address three learning goals: (1) understanding the interactive mode—and patterns—of triangular dynamics between Moscow, Beijing and Washington in both historical and contemporary terms; (2) critically testing and evaluating some theoretical propositions for triangle politics and its implications for international relations theories; and (3) completing a research paper on trilateral politics defined as interactions between any of the two in the triangle with a significant third-party input. Ultimately, students will learn how to do basic and original social science research by completing a total of 20 pages of research and writing assignments. The course is cross-listed for Political Science, International Studies, Russian and Central Eurasian Studies, and East Asian Studies. 10/16

RELI 213R/C 01
Religion and Medicine

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
Medicine and religion are core resources for human wellbeing, for tending body and spirit. Religion and medicine can work together to heal or be at cross purposes and cause harm; the relationship between the two is ever-changing. This course investigates the intersection and interaction of medicine and religion from a wide variety of perspectives. We will see how religious assumptions shape the way diseases like small pox are identified and mapped; we will also see how the experience of some diseases, like the plague and measles, have changed religious beliefs. From another angle, we’ll look at the work and commitments of both Buddhist and Christian medical missionaries. And from still another perspective, we’ll consider the importance of cultural and religious competence in taking medical case histories and delivering medical care. Finally, we will look at non-Western medical traditions and their religious framework, particularly that of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Overall, students will develop the capacity to identify fundamental values and assumptions about the ways our bodies, minds, and spirits work together. Course includes exams, short papers, and a research project.

Russian 152A/C
Journey Into the Fantastic

4 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite: None. Taught in English.

Join us in this course as each hero/ine takes a journey into a fantastic world! While it may be as “normal” as a hero/ine in a fairy tale on a quest, it might be as fantastic as a journey into the future 600 years from now or maybe to another planet! While journeying into the world of the fantastic, readers will be introduced to the best writers of 19th and 20th century Russian literature who use this medium just for fun, or maybe to discover other truths! No Russian is required!  All readings, lectures, and discussion in English. Fulfills either the “A” Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or “C” Non-Western Cultures General Education requirement.

SOCI 201C/S 1W
Topics:  War, Identity and Justice

4 Credits
Doubt, Keith
Prerequisite: None
What is the contemporary character of war and its destructive impact on societies? How does social violence confront and ultimately transform social identities at both the individual and the collective level? What is justice and its necessity to social order? Drawing upon sociology, documentaries, and political theory, this course studies war crimes, the construction of identity in multi-ethnic societies, the political character of nationalism, the social context of terrorism, and the idea of justice in our modern era. First, from the study of Bosnia, the course develops a sociology of war, a psychology of identity, and a philosophy of justice. Then, the course applies this set of concepts to the modern wars in Algeria, Chechnya, Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, and Ukraine. The objective  is develop a perspective on social violence at the collective level that is comparative and historical, one that is objective as well as moral, humanistic as well as empirical.

SOCI 201 02
Topics: Environmental Sociology

4 Credits
Shope, Dan

Prerequisite: None
The course will focus on factors related to population and economic growth, as well as public measures designed to mitigate the negative impact of this growth on the natural environment. Issues related to economics, urbanization, racial and gender relations, socio-economic status, use of technology, social movements, and popular culture will be discussed to broaden our understanding of environmental concerns. Specifically, this course will examine the philosophies, political ideologies, and social movements that have historically arisen to meet the challenges posed by increased pollution coupled with the difficulties of maintaining sustainable economic systems.

SOCI 277C/R 01
Islam and Society

4 Credits
Rahim, Naseem
Prerequisite: None
What is Islam and how is it related to Judaism and Christianity? After its birth in 610 AD in Arabia, Islam spread rapidly through the ancient Byzantine and Sassanian empires, Spain, the Indian peninsula and as far away as China and Mongolia. How did Islam interact with these very different cultures and societies? Today Islam is a global religion and one of the fastest growing faiths. Together we will explore how Islam is lived around the world, and how do Muslims express their unity, while retaining diverse cultural identities. Finally, what does it mean to be an American Muslim? Drawing from current academic and empirical resources in the fields of Islamic studies, comparative sociology, history, philosophy, literature, and other arts and sciences, we will construct a modern day understanding about lived Islam.

SOCI 301 01
Women and Poverty

4 Credits
Rowell, Kathy
Prerequisite: None
This course will use the sociological approach to explore and analyze the feminization and racialization of poverty in the United States and the world. Specific attention will be given to understanding both the structural forces that continue to cause and exacerbate poverty and to the individual lived experiences of women in children living in poverty.  The importance of public sociology as well as social activism will be explored as tools to reducing and solving poverty.

SOCI 330S 01
Wealth, Power and Poverty

4 credits
Nibert, David
Prerequisites: None
This course examines the causes and consequences of the unequal distribution of wealth and power in human societies. Historical and cross-cultural examples will be explored and global stratification will be examined.  Distribution of resources will be studied with reference to such variables as class, gender, race, age, and ability.  Current economic and political conditions will be examined for their bearing on contemporary unequal distributions of political, economic and social resources. Attention will be given to the institutionalized and ideological legitimation of social stratification as well as the relationship between animal oppression and human hunger and poverty. 

 

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