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Marine Science - Spring 2017

MRSC- 141N
Introduction to Marine Science

4 credits
Welch, Jim
This course is an introduction to the physical characteristics of the world’s oceans, the biology of the animals and plants that live there, and the ways in which humans interact with them. It includes elements of oceanography, fisheries biology and management, marine biology, and ways in which managers use the scientific method to learn about and protect marine resources. This course can serve as an entry point for the Marine Science minor for non-science majors.

BIOLOGY 239
Biology of Marine Invertebrates

5 credits
Reinsel, Kathy; Welch, Jim
Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
Over 90% of the world’s animals are invertebrates, and virtually all invertebrate groups have marine representatives. This course will focus on the major invertebrate taxa, examining their distinguishing characteristics in addition to their physiology, ecology, and natural history. In lab, we will observe specimens of many invertebrates, examine and describe the internal and external anatomy of some of them, and experiment with a few. Live specimens will be used whenever possible. Students may also participate in an optional field trip to the Duke Marine Laboratory, where we will collect observe invertebrates in a variety of marine habitats (Biology 258: Extended Field Studies - Marine Invertebrates).

BIOLOGY 258B
Extended Field Studies - Marine Invertebrates

1 credit
Reinsel, Kathy; Welch, Jim
Prerequisite:  Must take concurrently with Biology 239.
A 5-day field trip (Tuesday, April 25 - Saturday April 29) to the Duke Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. Students will participate in field trips to marine habitats to observe and collect invertebrates for study and experimentation at Wittenberg.

GEOL 260
Sedimentology

5 credits
Zaleha, Michael
Prerequisite:  Geology 150B, 160B or 170B, or one course from the Geology 110B-116N Series.
This course is a process-based approach to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The first part of the course will investigate the physical processes of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. These principles will then be applied to the study of modern depositional environments and processes as they relate to the interpretation of ancient deposits. Emphasis will be on siliciclastic and carbonate depositional environments and rocks. Labs include flume work, identification of important sedimentary structures, lab and field methods, and field trips.

MRSC 490
Independent Study

1-4 credits
Students must submit an Independent Study proposal to the Registrar’s Office, Recitation Hall, for final approval. After final approval, the student will be officially registered for the credits.

MRSC 491
Internship

1-8 credits
Students must submit an Internship Proposal to Career Services, Shouvlin Center, Room 210, for final approval. After final approval, the student will be officially registered for credit.

MRSC 492
Directed Research
1-4 credits

Students must submit an Independent Study-Directed Research Proposal to the Registrar’s Office, Recitation Hall, for final approval. After final approval, the student will be officially registered for the credits.

 

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