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Pre-Modern and Ancient Studies - Spring 2017

ECON 231
European Economic History

4 credits
Wishart, David
Prerequisites: Economics 190

Examination of the evolution of capitalism in Europe from the 15th century to the present, the impact of European capitalism on economies and societies in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise and demise of centrally planned state socialist economies in Russian and the Eastern European countries, and the prospects for European economic integration. Topics presented in this course emphasize the use of principles of economics to understand historical change and the methods of empirical analysis that are commonly used by economic historians. Writing intensive. Alternate years.

English 280A
British Literary Genealogies: Of Monsters and Other Extraordinary Humans
4 credits
Richards, Cynthia
Prerequisites: ENGL 180A, ENGL 190A/C or ENGL 270A

In this course, we will read, discuss, and write about representative texts from the Old English epic Beowulf to the iconic early nineteenth-century novel Frankenstein. We will also seek to locate these texts, spanning five different centuries, within the historical and ideological conditions which helped to determine their meaning for their contemporary readers. We will also remain attentive to how these early British texts build upon the work of their literary predecessors and also how they deliberately alter their message to meet the changing expectations of their culture. In the process, you will acquire a basic knowledge of literary terms, styles, forms, critical concepts, and significant dates.

The course will take as its organizing question what it means to be human. It will do so by looking at “monsters and other extraordinary humans,” or in other words, villains and their conquering heroes. Examining these exaggerated or simplified versions of what makes individuals noble or ignoble makes possible a complex understanding of what makes the ordinary extraordinary, and how literary narratives give voice to our common aspirations and fears. This theme will also help organize and familiarize a diverse, historical body of literature that can often feel quite foreign to the modern reader.

Finally, we will step back from these concerns to reflect and theorize on how English is made and why it is that we read these particular works as representative. Assignments include frequent response papers, two formal papers, a midterm exam and a final exam. Writing intensive.

ENGL 364A
Shakespeare
4 credits
Buckman, Ty
Prerequisites: ENGL majors: 270A or 280A recommended; non-ENGL majors: Junior standing & completion of one 100-level ENGL course required

Shakespeare survives as the only ‘single-author’ course regularly offered in the English Department at Wittenberg. This version of English 364 is not, however, designed primarily as a Shakespeare survey to introduce students to a writer they surely have already met many times before. The course will endeavor, rather, to build on the knowledge students have already accumulated from previous encounters with Shakespeare to pursue goals broadly in keeping with those of all advanced courses in the English major. The goals of the course, in descending order of importance, include the following: To develop skill in writing and constructing sophisticated arguments. To analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view. To broaden a student’s understanding of literary and aesthetic judgment by extensive reading in the work of one author. And finally, to acquire a basic knowledge of Shakespeare’s life, his plays and their genres, and the culture in which he lived. The various classroom activities and writing assignments have been designed to meet these goals. Students will be expected to prepare for class faithfully, take part in a number of collaborative activities, compile a “commonplace book” of their reading responses, take a midterm exam, and write two papers and a film review.

HIST 105 C/H 01
Pre-Modern World History

4 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite: None.
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 111H 01
Medieval Europe
4 credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite: First Year Students ONLY – Supplemental Instruction will be available.

Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades…these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

 In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 111H 02
Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Knights in shining armor, peasants toiling in the fields, damsels in distress, castles, cathedrals, crusades…these are some of the enduring images of the medieval world. This course will explore the social, cultural, and economic changes that made up the dynamic period we call the middle ages. Through lectures, discussion, films, debates and readings, the important developments, accomplishments and failings of the medieval centuries will be brought to life. Students will be evaluated through three essay exams, quizzes, and class participation. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST240H  1W
Medieval England

4 Credits
Livingstone, Amy
Prerequisite: None
From the grubby peasant to men in tights to corpulent kings, images of “Merrie Olde England” abound in popular culture. This course will examine the history of England from the time of King Arthur through the fourteenth century (roughly 500-1400 AD). Modern interpretations will be paired with medieval sources to examine the authenticity of their depiction of England’s medieval centuries. Students will be expected to master the history of medieval England, but also to sharpen and develop their critical thinking skills as they interact with popular depictions, the interpretations of scholars and the voices of medieval people. As a writing intensive course, assignments will be sequenced to help students develop their writing skills. Modes of evaluation will include, quizzes, essay exams, papers and class discussions. This course counts toward the PAST minor.   

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST 251C/H 1W
Medieval Russia

4 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite:  None.
Russia occupies a unique position between Europe and Asia. This class will explore the creation of the Russian state, and the foundation of the question of is Russia European or Asian? We will begin with the exploration and settlement of the Vikings in Eastern Europe, which began the genesis of the state known as “Rus’.”  That state was integrated into the larger medieval world through a variety of means, from Christianization, to dynastic marriage, and economic ties. However, over the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the creation of the crusading ideal and the arrival of the Mongols began the process of separating Rus’ (becoming Russia) from the rest of Europe. This continued with the creation of power centers in NE Russia, and the transition of the idea of empire from Byzantium at its fall to Muscovy. This story of medieval Russia is a unique one that impacts both the traditional history of medieval Europe, as well as the birth of the first Eurasian empire. Writing Intensive. Counts for RCEP/PAST Programs.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST306 1W
Byzantium

4 Credits
Raffensperger, Christian; Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite:  One course in History or Permission.
Welcome to the survey of the history of Byzantium. As an archaeologist and a historian, we have designed this course with an eye to establishing a visual and textual history of the the Byzantine empire through the analysis of documentary, historical (Procopius, Anna Comnena, John of Nikiou) and artifactual (visual culture found in archaeological records and museum collections) evidence. We will establish a chronology for the major events and visual markers with which we might reconstruct.  Particular attention is given to non-traditional divisions of looking at this 1000 year old empire. We will assess how regional differences created a variety of approaches to Byzantine life and culture. Readings from the ancient world will frame how we consider the concerns of ancient authors and how they recorded the history of their own times in art and writing. Discussions will require some knowledge of Biblical themes, and a willingness to discuss faith, lived religion and devotion. This course is writing intensive and may count toward the interdisciplinary Pre-Modern and Ancient World Studies (PAST) minor and Africana Studies.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

POLI 211R 01
Ancient & Medieval Political Philosophy
4 credits

Wright, Heather
This is a challenging and thought-provoking course which explores the history of political philosophy from ancient Greek drama to medieval thought through a combination of primary textual analysis and interpretive commentary. What is political philosophy? Simply put, it is the quest for knowledge about the nature of politics. Ancient and medieval political philosophers sought knowledge about many of our most compelling and vital human questions. What is the nature of human beings? What is nature itself? What is justice? How can we begin to understand power? What is the good life for human beings? What is the best form of political rule? What is the proper relationship of philosophy to politics? On what basis might we construct our ethical life? Are men and women different, and if so, how might this impact the political? Not surprisingly, political philosophers have thought and continue to think very differently about these topics. 10/16

RELI 134C/R 01
Chinese and Japanese Religious Traditions

4 semester hours
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
Some Chinese and Japanese religious traditions may have familiar names: Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. Others—especially their vibrant and surprising popular traditions—permeate Chinese and Japanese cultures and affect family traditions, East Asian cuisine, literature, political structures, the work place, and even practices like feng shui and acupuncture. We will look at all these traditions, and the way that they connect to the rich cultures and histories of Japan and China. Our sources will include the great classics, personal narratives, studies by outsiders, newspaper clippings, and video clips. Course work includes exams, a short paper, and a project with the option of modified monastic living.

RELI 222R 01
Understanding the New Testament

4 credits
Fetherolf, Christina
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed for religion majors, pre-theological students and other serious students of religion. Throughout the term we will attempt to understand the historical context of the New Testament literature, discover the religious perspectives which shape the New Testament texts and appreciate the richness of the New Testament writings. Students will be required to read the New Testament and some non-canonical texts, post regularly on Moodle and take four exams. The class has a lecture/discussion format.

Religion 333 C/R
Buddhist Thought and Scriptures

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
This seminar studies the teachings and practices of schools of the Buddhist tradition through close consideration of pivotal Buddhist scriptures. We will consider sutras and other texts from Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana Buddhism in their historical and cultural contexts, and within the framework of central themes and beliefs of Buddhism. Class requirements include tests, a seminar presentations, short response papers/questions for seminar, and a term paper. Writing intensive.

 

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