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Political Science - Spring 2017

POLI 101S 01 & 04
American National Government

4 credits
Baker, Rob
This introductory course is intended to provide the student with a broad overview of American governmental institutions, processes, and policies. The Constitutional basis of our political system serves as the foundation for lectures and discussions. The course is required for all majors, and is a prerequisite for certain other upper-level courses in political science. A subscription to the New York Times is required.

NOTE: This course is required of all political science majors and minors. 10/16

POLI 101S 02 & 03
American National Government

4 credits
Rhine, Staci
This course introduces students to American government and politics. The course includes sections on the Constitution, rights and liberties, the major institutions, and political behavior.  Students will use current topics in politics to understand the processes of government.  Classes will be a combination of lecture and discussion. The course material will include several textbooks and The New York Times. There will be three exams, quizzes, and a paper.

NOTE: This course is required of all political science majors and minors. 10/16

POLI 102S 01
Introduction to Comparative Politics

4 credits
Yu, Bin

This course begins with some of the central concepts of comparative approaches to the study of politics. It then examines the origins, development, institutions, and the functioning of political systems of three general types of politics: industrialized democracies (Britain and France), the rise and fall of communist systems (Russia and China), as well as the workings and problems of the Third World (Africa and East Asia). There will be two mid-terms, a final exam, and quiz.

NOTE:  This course is required of all political science majors and minors. 10/16

POLI 211R 01
Ancient & Medieval Political Philosophy
4 credits

Wright, Heather
This is a challenging and thought-provoking course which explores the history of political philosophy from ancient Greek drama to medieval thought through a combination of primary textual analysis and interpretive commentary. What is political philosophy? Simply put, it is the quest for knowledge about the nature of politics. Ancient and medieval political philosophers sought knowledge about many of our most compelling and vital human questions. What is the nature of human beings? What is nature itself? What is justice? How can we begin to understand power? What is the good life for human beings? What is the best form of political rule? What is the proper relationship of philosophy to politics? On what basis might we construct our ethical life? Are men and women different, and if so, how might this impact the political? Not surprisingly, political philosophers have thought and continue to think very differently about these topics. 10/16

POLI 221S 01
State and Local Government
4 credits

Baker, Rob
The course focuses on important contemporary problems and trends affecting state and local politics, and the role of states and localities in the federal system. Using a comparative approach, attention is given to general intergovernmental, social, economic, and cultural influences that shape state and local politics in America. Additionally, a mock state legislature is conducted providing the student with a "hands-on" experience in one of the key political processes of state government. 10/16

POLI 234S 01
Black Politics

4 credits
Young, John
This course will introduce students to the nature of black politics and black political behavior.  The course will inquire into the political dimensions of black life in America and how Black Americans have interpreted and responded to the democratic experiment.  Considerable attention will be given to how individuals, institutions, and protest movements have shaped black political consciousness and black political participation.  Finally, the course will examine the relative impact of black protest politics versus black electoral politics in addressing black political demands. Evaluation will be based on three exams, several quizzes, class participation, and short, one page writing assignments. 10/16

POLI 251S 01
International Relations
4 credits

Yu, Bin
This course begins with an overview of the evolution of international system. This is followed by the discussion of some key theoretical concepts and approaches in the study of international relations (IR). Students will then apply IR history and theories to analyze some major issues in the 21st century, including international security, international political economy, nationalism, democratization, and global governance. The course has a lecture/discussion format. There will be a mid-term, a final exam, one short take-home paper, and a few quizzes. 10/16

POLI 260 1Z
Methodology
4 credits
Hasecke, Ed

Prerequisite: Math Placement Score of 22. This course engages students in political science research. Class sessions focus on conceptualization and design of a research project; various data collection methods used in political science; data analysis techniques; and the process of writing a research paper. Students are expected to perform original research. Evaluation is based on take-home exams, short exercises, and a major research paper.

NOTE:  The course is required for all political science majors. 10/16

WRITING INTENSIVE

POLI 315 1W
Feminist and Postmodern Political Thought
4 credits

Wright, Heather
Prerequisites: Jr class standing and POLI 211R, 212R, 215R or 216R, or permission of instructor
An exploration of the major figures, schools of thought, and concepts in Feminist and Postmodern political thought, culminating in an examination of the often uneasy relationship between feminism and postmodernism.  Readings include Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, Foucault, Wollstonecraft, Goldman, MacKinnon, Elshtain, and Irigaray, among others.  Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, an analytical paper, midterm and final essay examinations, and class preparation and participation. 10/16

WRITING INTENSIVE

POLI 323 1W
U. S. Congress
4 credits

Hasecke, Ed
Prerequisites: POLI 101 and Jr Class Standing
In this course, students will be exposed to the world of Congress through a semester-long simulation. Class sessions will mix traditional lecture/discussion with simulated legislative experiences. As a class we will discuss Congressional structure and legislative strategy. We will also engage in a class research project that involves data collection and statistical analysis. A subscription to an online Congressional simulation (www.legsim.org) is required.  Evaluation will be based on participation in the simulation, several written assignments and a final paper. 10/16

WRITING INTENSIVE

POLI 359 1W
Russian-China-US Trilateral Relations
4 credits

Yu, Bin
PREREQUISITE:  Either POLI 102S, 205C, 210CS, or 251S, Jr class standing, RCEP or permission of instructor
The course explores issues of trilateral politics between Russia, China and the U.S. It is designed to address three learning goals: (1) understanding the interactive mode—and patterns—of triangular dynamics between Moscow, Beijing and Washington in both historical and contemporary terms; (2) critically testing and evaluating some theoretical propositions for triangle politics and its implications for international relations theories; and (3) completing a research paper on trilateral politics defined as interactions between any of the two in the triangle with a significant third-party input. Ultimately, students will learn how to do basic and original social science research by completing a total of 20 pages of research and writing assignments. The course is cross-listed for Political Science, International Studies, Russian and Central Eurasian Studies, and East Asian Studies. 10/16

 

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