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Russian and Central Eurasian Studies - Spring 2017

ECON 231
European Economic History

4 credits
Wishart, David
Prerequisites:
Economics 190
Examination of the evolution of capitalism in Europe from the 15th century to the present, the impact of European capitalism on economies and societies in the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise and demise of centrally planned state socialist economies in Russian and the Eastern European countries, and the prospects for European economic integration. Topics presented in this course emphasize the use of principles of economics to understand historical change and the methods of empirical analysis that are commonly used by economic historians. Writing intensive. Alternate years.

HIST 251C/H 1W
Medieval Russia

4 credits
Raffensperger, Christian
Prerequisite: None.
Russia occupies a unique position between Europe and Asia. This class will explore the creation of the Russian state, and the foundation of the question of is Russia European or Asian? We will begin with the exploration and settlement of the Vikings in Eastern Europe, which began the genesis of the state known as “Rus’.” That state was integrated into the larger medieval world through a variety of means, from Christianization, to dynastic marriage, and economic ties. However, over the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries the creation of the crusading ideal and the arrival of the Mongols began the process of separating Rus’ (becoming Russia) from the rest of Europe. This continued with the creation of power centers in NE Russia, and the transition of the idea of empire from Byzantium at its fall to Muscovy. This story of medieval Russia is a unique one that impacts both the traditional history of medieval Europe, as well as the birth of the first Eurasian empire. Writing Intensive. Counts for RCEP/PAST Programs.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

HIST306 1W
Byzantium

4 Credits
Raffensperger, Christian; Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene
Prerequisite: One course in History or Permission.
Welcome to the survey of the history of Byzantium. As an archaeologist and a historian, we have designed this course with an eye to establishing a visual and textual history of the the Byzantine empire through the analysis of documentary, historical (Procopius, Anna Comnena, John of Nikiou) and artifactual (visual culture found in archaeological records and museum collections) evidence. We will establish a chronology for the major events and visual markers with which we might reconstruct.  Particular attention is given to non-traditional divisions of looking at this 1000 year old empire. We will assess how regional differences created a variety of approaches to Byzantine life and culture. Readings from the ancient world will frame how we consider the concerns of ancient authors and how they recorded the history of their own times in art and writing. Discussions will require some knowledge of Biblical themes, and a willingness to discuss faith, lived religion and devotion. This course is writing intensive and may count toward the interdisciplinary Pre-Modern and Ancient World Studies (PAST) minor and Africana Studies.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
CLAC modules offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit towards their majors and minors in French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian. You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 260).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language. CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline. You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign language (i.e. one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about whatever you’re studying and share insights from the research you do in your target language with your colleagues in other disciplines. CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you. The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience. Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline. CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

POLI 359 1W
Russian-China-US Trilateral Relations

4 credits
Yu, Bin
Prerequisite: Either POLI 102S, 205C, 210CS, or 251S, Jr class standing, RCEP or permission of instructor
The course explores issues of trilateral politics between Russia, China and the U.S. It is designed to address three learning goals: (1) understanding the interactive mode—and patterns—of triangular dynamics between Moscow, Beijing and Washington in both historical and contemporary terms; (2) critically testing and evaluating some theoretical propositions for triangle politics and its implications for international relations theories; and (3) completing a research paper on trilateral politics defined as interactions between any of the two in the triangle with a significant third-party input. Ultimately, students will learn how to do basic and original social science research by completing a total of 20 pages of research and writing assignments. The course is cross-listed for Political Science, International Studies, Russian and Central Eurasian Studies, and East Asian Studies. 10/16

Russian 112F
Beginning Russian II

4 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite:  Russian 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111, practice with conversation and grammatical patterns.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Russian 152A/C
Journey Into the Fantastic

4 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite:  None. Taught in English.

Join us in this course as each hero/ine takes a journey into a fantastic world!  While it may be as “normal” as a hero/ine in a fairy tale on a quest, it might be as fantastic as a journey into the future 600 years from now or maybe to another planet!  While journeying into the world of the fantastic, readers will be introduced to the best writers of 19th and 20th century Russian literature who use this medium just for fun, or maybe to discover other truths!  No Russian is required!  All readings, lectures, and discussion in English.  Fulfills either the “A” Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or “C” Non-Western Cultures General Education requirement.

Russian 230S
Language in Society

4 credits
Imai, Terumi
Prerequisite:  None. Taught in English.

This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

Russian 262F/1.2
Art of Translation

2 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisites: Russian 263
This course continues the progress made in Russian 263 as well as introducing new topics on the Russian verb system and other questions of translation.

Russian 264F/1.1
Voices From the Past

2 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite: Russian 260 or permission of instructor
Students will study a decade of Russian history through readings, biographies, and films. Additional grammatical topics for reading Russian will be included.

Russian 317/1.2
Russian National Identity

2 credits
Zaharkov, Lila
Prerequisite:  Russian 316
Students will examine questions of Russian cultural identity that include issues such as relationships, differences in values and self-perceptions. Course supplemented by films concerning these issues.

Russian 490
Independent Study

SOCI 201C/S 1W
Topics:  War, Identity and Justice

4 Credits
Doubt, Keith
Prerequisite: None
What is the contemporary character of war and its destructive impact on societies? How does social violence confront and ultimately transform social identities at both the individual and the collective level? What is justice and its necessity to social order?  Drawing upon sociology, documentaries, and political theory, this course studies war crimes, the construction of identity in multi-ethnic societies, the political character of nationalism, the social context of terrorism, and the idea of justice in our modern era. First, from the study of Bosnia, the course develops a sociology of war, a psychology of identity, and a philosophy of justice. Then, the course applies this set of concepts to the modern wars in Algeria, Chechnya, Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, and Ukraine. The objective  is develop a perspective on social violence at the collective level that is comparative and historical, one that is objective as well as moral, humanistic as well as empirical.

Russian 490
Independent Study

RCEP 495
Cap SEM RCEP
2 Credits
Raffensperger, Christian

Prerequisite: Senior RCEP Majors – by permission.

 

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