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Religion - Spring 2017

RELI 134C/R 01
Chinese and Japanese Religious Traditions
4 credits

Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Prerequisite: None
Some Chinese and Japanese religious traditions may have familiar names: Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. Others—especially their vibrant and surprising popular traditions—permeate Chinese and Japanese cultures and affect family traditions, East Asian cuisine, literature, political structures, the work place, and even practices like feng shui and acupuncture. We will look at all these traditions, and the way that they connect to the rich cultures and histories of Japan and China. Our sources will include the great classics, personal narratives, studies by outsiders, newspaper clippings, and video clips. Course work includes exams, a short paper, and a project with the option of modified monastic living.

Religion 177R 01
Religious Perspectives on Contemporary Moral Issues

4 credits
Nelson, Paul
Prerequisite: None
This course is intended to provide an introduction to basic moral concepts in Judaism and Christianity (both Roman Catholic and Protestant) and their application to specific issues of current interest. The course examines the relation of moral teachings to the broader theological context in which they occur, analyzes in detail positions taken by religious moralists on particular issues and compares these positions with those of secular thinkers. In some cases, Jewish and Christian perspectives may be compared with those of Islamic, Hindu or Buddhist thinkers. Topics may include lying, sexuality and procreation, assisted reproduction, abortion, euthanasia, stem cell research, genetic engineering, human rights, war, terrorism and nuclear deterrence, equality and gender, justice in access to health care and economic life, religion and politics, and environmental ethics.

RELI 213R/C 01
Religion and Medicine

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Pre-requisite:  None
Medicine and religion are core resources for human wellbeing, for tending body and spirit. Religion and medicine can work together to heal or be at cross purposes and cause harm; the relationship between the two is ever-changing. This course investigates the intersection and interaction of medicine and religion from a wide variety of perspectives. We will see how religious assumptions shape the way diseases like small pox are identified and mapped; we will also see how the experience of some diseases, like the plague and measles, have changed religious beliefs. From another angle, we’ll look at the work and commitments of both Buddhist and Christian medical missionaries. And from still another perspective, we’ll consider the importance of cultural and religious competence in taking medical case histories and delivering medical care. Finally, we will look at non-Western medical traditions and their religious framework, particularly that of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Overall, students will develop the capacity to identify fundamental values and assumptions about the ways our bodies, minds, and spirits work together. Course includes exams, short papers, and a research project.

RELI 222R  01
Understanding the New Testament

4 credits
Fetherolf, Christina
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed for religion majors, pre-theological students and other serious students of religion. Throughout the term we will attempt to understand the historical context of the New Testament literature, discover the religious perspectives which shape the New Testament texts and appreciate the richness of the New Testament writings. Students will be required to read the New Testament and some non-canonical texts, post regularly on Moodle and take four exams. The class has a lecture/discussion format.

Religion 333 C/R
Buddhist Thought and Scriptures

4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
Pre-requisite: None
This seminar studies the teachings and practices of schools of the Buddhist tradition through close consideration of pivotal Buddhist scriptures. We will consider sutras and other texts from Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana Buddhism in their historical and cultural contexts, and within the framework of central themes and beliefs of Buddhism.  Class requirements include tests, a seminar presentations, short response papers/questions for seminar, and a term paper. Writing intensive. 

RELI 378R  1W
Bioethics

4 credits
Nelson, Paul
This seminar introduces students to basic concepts, issues and arguments in bioethics. The readings are taken from the disciplines of biology, ecology, medicine, philosophy, religious ethics, law, and policy studies. Goals for the seminar include (1) becoming familiar with a significant body of professional literature; (2) learning to identify moral issues, analyze moral arguments, and to make and defend moral judgments; (3) reflecting on what it means to be a physician or patient; and (4) exploring the relations between ethics, law and public policy. Topics include abortion, reproductive technologies, stem cell research, cloning, euthanasia, autonomy, paternalism, use of human subjects in research, access to health care, allocation of scarce resources, and environmental ethics. Writing intensive.

Religion 498 – 1W
Senior Capstone

1 credit
Staff
Majors may write their Senior Essay in connection with any upper-division Religion course taken in the junior or senior year. Students should register for this course along with the upper-division course at the same time to do so. Writing intensive. Every year.

 

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