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History - Fall 2013

HIST 105H/C 1W.   Pre Modern World
4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:   Freshman Section Only.  
This course considers how in the world ancient history matters in shaping the modern world. We will discard memorization of dates to consider real questions that have historical importance in thinking about the past. We will develop skills in reading, debating and argumentation as we consider issues such as how telling stories about the world reflect core values of society, what medical beliefs about the body tell us about gender roles in the past, what beliefs were foundation to the Islamic empire, how Genghis Khan ushered in the modern age, and to what degree ancient religious beliefs predetermine the political and ethical history of a community. We will read primary sources from period, examine archaeological remains of material culture and read historical fiction as a way to engage with these questions and establish skills in thinking critically about the past.    This course counts toward the PAST minor.  Reading and writing intensive.

 

HIST 105H/C 2W.   Pre Modern World
4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:   None  
This course considers how in the world ancient history matters in shaping the modern world. We will discard memorization of dates to consider real questions that have historical importance in thinking about the past. We will develop skills in reading, debating and argumentation as we consider issues such as how telling stories about the world reflect core values of society, what medical beliefs about the body tell us about gender roles in the past, what beliefs were foundation to the Islamic empire, how Genghis Khan ushered in the modern age, and to what degree ancient religious beliefs predetermine the political and ethical history of a community. We will read primary sources from period, examine archaeological remains of material culture and read historical fiction as a way to engage with these questions and establish skills in thinking critically about the past.    This course counts toward the PAST minor.  Reading and writing intensive.

 

HIST 106H/C 1W.   Modern World
4.00 credits
Proctor, T.

Prerequisite:  none
Are you interested in what the Aztecs thought of the Spanish? Have you ever thought about how Japanese farmers experienced life in the 19th century? In "The Modern World," we will examine such questions in an attempt to re-examine our assumptions about non-western cultures since 1400, while seeing the connections between these cultures and western civilizations. Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations. Writing intensive.   (This course is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST 106H/C 2W.   Modern World
4.00 credits
Proctor, T.

Prerequisite:  none
Are you interested in what the Aztecs thought of the Spanish? Have you ever thought about how Japanese farmers experienced life in the 19th century? In "The Modern World," we will examine such questions in an attempt to re-examine our assumptions about non-western cultures since 1400, while seeing the connections between these cultures and western civilizations. Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations. Writing intensive.   (This course is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST 111 H 1W.   Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, A.

Prerequisite:  none.
The origins of medieval Europe are grounded in the world of Late Antiquity. This class begins with the last of the Western Roman Emperors by surveying the “barbarian” kingdoms that had been created in the fourth and fifth centuries. Essential to understanding Europe is the relationship between East and West. Starting with a dominant Byzantium in the early part of our course, we’ll examine ups and downs in the East/West relationship in the ninth and early twelfth centuries and their antagonistic relationship after 1204 and the sack of Constantinople. Essential to this story are the lives of women and religious minorities, such as Jews, Muslims, and pagans. Those stories will be woven in with the traditional highlights of the Middle Ages, such as Charlemagne’s ascension as Holy Roman Emperor, the Viking raids throughout Europe, the rise of the Normans and the conquest of England, the reform papacy and the Crusades, and the beginning of the Renaissance. Medieval Europe changed drastically over the thousand years studied in this course, and we will attempt to both understand the events and processes that contributed to that change as well as the shape of Europe at the end of our period.   This course counts toward the PAST minor.  Writing intensive.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST112H  Modern Europe
4.00 credits
Staff

Prerequisite:  none.
Modern Europe is a course that examines the development of major political ideologies, social changes, economic transformations, and global networks between the early modern period and the early 21st century.  Students will be asked to work with primary documents and secondary source materials, complete quizzes, short assignments, exams, and oral presentations.

 

HIST 121H: United States History I
4.00 credits
Staff

An introduction to US history from colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. The course combines lecture and discussions to develop an understanding the facts and story of American history and to problems in interpreting that story. The course is divided into three units: early America to the revolution; form the revolution into the early republic; and the era of the Civil War. Books include James L. Roark et al, The American Promise, Volume I (4/e ; The Bedford Glossary for U.S. History; John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government.  Not writing intensive. Quizzes and tests.

 

HIST  122H 01.  U. S.  History 1877 to Present
4.00 credits   
Wood, M.

Prerequisite:   none.
How did new technology change the lives of average Americans in the late nineteenth century?  What role did American women play in World War I?  How did the Civil Rights Movement change American society?  How and why did Harry Truman decide to use the atomic bomb on Japan?  How did Americans react to the Vietnam War?  These are just a few of the questions we will discuss in HIST 222, a survey of some of the major themes, topics and issues in American history from 1877 to the present.  We will focus on selected social, political, diplomatic, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the nation, its varied regions and peoples.  This course will consist of lecture, class discussion and numerous reading and writing assignments.  Attendance is very important.  Students will grapple with problems of historical perspective and interpretation, and are expected to participate in discussion, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all assignments.  (This course, or an equivalent course such as HIST 226 or HIST 227, is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.  See the history department chair for information on other possible equivalent courses.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST 122H 02.  U. S.  History 1877 to Present
4.00 credits   
Wood, M.

Prerequisite:   none.
How did new technology change the lives of average Americans in the late nineteenth century?  What role did American women play in World War I?  How did the Civil Rights Movement change American society?  How and why did Harry Truman decide to use the atomic bomb on Japan?  How did Americans react to the Vietnam War?  These are just a few of the questions we will discuss in HIST 222, a survey of some of the major themes, topics and issues in American history from 1877 to the present.  We will focus on selected social, political, diplomatic, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the nation, its varied regions and peoples.  This course will consist of lecture, class discussion and numerous reading and writing assignments.  Attendance is very important.  Students will grapple with problems of historical perspective and interpretation, and are expected to participate in discussion, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all assignments.  (This course, or an equivalent course such as HIST 226 or HIST 227, is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.  See the history department chair for information on other possible equivalent courses.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST 170C 1W.   Genocide in Modern Africa
4.00 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite:  none
During the 20th century, Africans fought against a range of inequalities, both during and after colonial rule. In their creative resuscitations of the past they have struggled over the production and reproduction of social categories such as nationalism and ethnicity. This class will explore a number of issues such as the construction of Africa's current national borders as well as ethnicity and "tribalism" which are often blamed for much of Africa's strife. This class will look closely at a number of violent liberation struggles as well as several civil wars that have occurred since liberation In particular, we will look at the civil wars/genocides of Nigeria, Uganda, Rwanda, and the Sudan. Lastly, the question of AIDS in Africa will be addressed. Novels and films will be used to provide a more personal account of these events. Students will be evaluated on class participation, take-home exams, and papers based upon the readings.  Writing intensive.

 

HIST 202H 2W.  Children of the Past
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E and  Sophomore standing.  
What was it like growing up in the past? Did pre modern people have a “childhood?” Historians have recently turned their attention to investigating the private lives of medieval and early modern people. In this class we will explore what historians have uncovered about growing up in the past. We will examine the experiences of children in medieval London and Florence, Reformation Germany and sixteenth-century France.  This course will also examine how historians “do” history. What methods, theories, philosophies inform how historians have approached examining the history of childhood? What are the issues that confront historians in regard to the use of primary sources and historiographic traditions? Should historians be objective? Can they be objective? Each of those questions is fundamental to the task, vocation and obligation of the historian. To address such issues, students will read, analyze and critique primary sources. The “history” of historical interpretation, or historiography, will also be explored through a series of monographs and articles. Students will write several short analytical essays, as well as a longer historiographical paper, and participate in discussion and debate.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.  Writing intensive. 

 

HIST 203H 1W.  Negro Leagues
4. 00 credits
Rosenberg, S.

Prerequisite:  ENG101E and Sophomore standing.
The course will focus on the Negro Leagues that existed in the United States from the early 20th century until the late 1960s. We will also explore the experience of black baseball players both before and after the period of segregation in the United States. While it is essential that we come to grips with the broader political, social, and economic institutions that supported racial segregation, the main focus of this course is to expose the lives that black baseball players made for themselves. In exploring the lives of African-American baseball players, we will focus on an emerging culture and the evolution of race relations. Of particular interest will be the few successful Negro Leagues that operated from 1919 through the 1940s and the long process of breaking baseball's color barrier from 1946 through the 1960s.  This course is designed to teach students the basic skills of researching and writing a historical paper. Assessment will be based on a book review, two take home exams, and the main component of the grade will be based on the research assignments and final paper. Writing intensive.

 

HIST 303 1.1W.  Ancient Historians:  Herodotus and the Persian Wars
2.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:   One course in history or permission of instructor.
 Class meets first half of the semester.
Herodotus and Thucydides. They are the first fathers of history and yet, Herodotus has been sometimes regarded as a liar rather than a defender of the facts. By reading selections of Herodotus’s Histories we will investigate the Persian Wars with the Greeks, his view of Scythians nomads, and Book II, which is one of the early portraits of ancient Egypt by an historian. Through examining archaeological and textual remains, we will explore the question of whether Herodotus was the Father of History or the Father of Lies. This 2-credit course will be writing intensive.   There will be writing exercises dedicated to interpreting source materials in both textual and archaeological forms. Substantial reading in primary sources and secondary literature will be required.

 

HIST 303 1.2W.  Ancient Historians:  Arrian and Alexander the Great
2.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:   One course in history or permission of instructor.
 Class meets second half of the semester
Biographies of Alexander the Great were written by his generals, but only fragments remain in later Roman biographies of the young Macedonian conqueror. This 2-credit course will examine the textual evidence for Alexander the Great, why Arrian is considered his most successful biographer, and how Plutarch’s reserved history compares with other Roman historians. We will also read two modern biographies of Alexander to consider the historiography that shapes the study of Hellenism. The course is writing intensive.  There will be writing exercises dedicated to interpreting source materials in both textual and archaeological forms.  Substantial reading in primary sources and secondary literature will be required.

 

HIST 301 1W.  TOPIC:  Civil War
4.00 credits
Taylor, Thomas

Prerequisite:  HIST 121 or equivalent.
Intensive examination of the origins, course, and aftermath of the American Civil War. Specific topics include the antislavery movement, the political crises of the 1850s, and secession; the outbreak of war and its evolution in the western and eastern theaters; major leaders and the strategic shifts of 1864; the postwar battles over Reconstruction, racial equality, and federalism. Each student will write a ten-page research paper on a topic of the student’s choice.  Tests, quizzes, and writing.  Writing Intensive.

 

HIST 313 1W.  Living in Medieval England
4.00 credits
Livingstone, A.

Prerequisite:  One course in History or permission of instructor.

The history of medieval England from the Anglo-Saxons through the Plantagenets  is full of compelling historical personalities who left a lasting imprint on England and medieval Europe. This course will focus on some of the famous or infamous personages of that time, such as Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as some of the heroic kings, like William the Conqueror and Edward I, and the mythic figures of King Arthur and Robin Hood. In addition to these well-known historical personages, the lives of less extraordinary including medieval peasants, merchants and monks, will also be explored. In addition to exposing students to the rich history of medieval England, another learning objective for this course is to develop students’ appreciation for the complexities of historical study by having them read primary sources and the often-conflicting interpretations of medieval scholars.  Students will write several short response papers, two source analyses (one of a primary source, one of a historiographical debate) and will produce a major research paper on the topic of their choice, which they will present to the class.   This course counts toward the PAST minor.   Writing intensive.

HIST 411 1W.   Senior Seminar
4.00 credits
Wood, M.

Prerequisite:  Senior history majors only and HIST 202 and HIST 203.
This capstone to your history experience allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of historical method, historiography, and research skills.  You will research and write a long paper based on previous historical coursework, present that research in an oral presentation, and engage in discussions with other students about the nature and practice of history.  Papers, small assignments, tests, and in-class discussion constitute the graded coursework.   Writing intensive.

 

HIST 490 00.  Independent Study
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

HIST 491 00.   Internship
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

HIST 499 00.   Senior Honors Thesis
0.00-8.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

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