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East Asian Studies - Fall 2014

BUSN 290C 01. Social Entrepreneurship and Global Leadership in East
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

The world has changed in fundamental ways over the last few years ­ as the challenges have become more complex and intractable. An increasingly popular solution to global social problems lies in the field of social entrepreneurship and global leadership, in which business and nonprofit (or NGO) leaders design, grow, and lead social enterprises. With the traditional lines between for-profit enterprise, nonprofit enterprise, and government beginning to blur, it is critical that students understand this emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of social entrepreneurship. This class highlights how social enterprises and challenges in East Asia differ from that of Western European and American. Students will work on social venture business plan in this class.

 

BUSN 290C 02. Business and Management in East Asia
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

Asia, ablaze with economic energy, is changing the shape of the world economy and the scope and nature of competition among the world's companies. Western firms face a world far different and more challenging than just a few years ago, thanks largely to the rise of new and increasingly powerful competitors from Japan, Korea and now China. This course provides an introduction to the variety of ways in which business is conducted in East Asia and ways that multinational firms originated from East Asia operate in the world. It also provides a foundation in cultural and political aspects of business in East Asia, which tend to be thoroughly intertwined in international business.

 

CHIN 111 01. Beginning Chinese I
5 credits
Chan, Shelley

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Chinese is a fascinating language.  It does not have Western style grammatical features such as tense, gender, number, agreement, etc.  Instead, grammatical values are defined by markers and position, with the result that where elements are in sentences determines meaning.  Chinese has a relatively simple phonetic structure and uses tones (voice pitches) to differentiate between words. The character writing system operates on the basis of representing concepts and sounds in a way that is fundamentally different from English alphabetic writing.  These differences make Chinese an entrancing language and a window on a very different way of talking and thinking about the world.  This year we will continue to use a textbook that concentrates on communicating in Chinese.  Mastering the dialogues and conversations it contains will give you the ability to interact with Chinese people on topics from everyday life.  We will also begin our study of the specifics of the Chinese writing system, and over the semester you will learn to read and write 250 characters and compounds.

 

CHIN 151A/C 01 & 02. Film and Fiction in Modern China
4 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite: No prerequisites. Taught in English
We will watch and discuss representative films from the major waves of movie making in China, and we will read representative fiction from the four main literary periods in 20th century China; in some cases, the readings will be the original stories used to make the movies.  We will focus on both the aesthetics of the short stories and movies as well as the cultural values they express. All readings, discussions, and lectures will be in English, and the films will have English subtitles. The Chinese have written magnificent stories and made great films so it will be an interesting and entertaining course.  The course can be used to meet either the “A” or “C” General Education requirements.

 

CHIN 211F 01. Intermediate Chinese I
5 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Chinese 112 or placement
We will focus on continuing to build both your reading and speaking abilities in modern Chinese.  There will be an emphasis on reviewing the grammar we previously studied and mastering additional structures.  We will, of course, be learning new vocabulary and developing greater skill with the writing system of the language.  There will be many different activities aiming at improving your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 

CHIN 270  CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
1 credit
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Chinese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

CHIN 311 01. Directed Readings in Chinese Newspapers
4 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Chinese 212
This is a third year course in advanced Chinese.  It aims at developing competence in the language with an emphasis on strategies and tactics of reading Chinese newspapers to enable students to acquaint themselves with recent developments in China.  To accommodate the rapid changes in Chinese life and language today, we will supplement each lesson of the textbook with authentic news articles from the Internet.  Students should expect a steady expansion of their vocabulary and speak the language in all classroom activities.

 

CHIN 370.  CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
1 credit
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite:  Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Chinese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

CHIN 490. Independent Study
Tutorials for the student who has excelled in previous study of Chinese. Thematic content chosen according to student's intellectual interests. Conducted in spoken putonghua.

 

HONR 300A/C 1W. Nanking Massacre: Film and Fiction
4 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite:  Permission of the Honors Program & signature of the program administrative assistant required.
This is an Honors seminar designed to enhance intellectual experience for University Honors students through a specified theme and prepare them for writing an Honors Thesis in their major area of study. To understand the recent regional tensions in East Asia that have impacted on the global politics, economy and culture, the theme of this course is the Nanking Massacre during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45) of WWII. An in-depth study of film and fiction about the Nanking Massacre will enhance aesthetic experience by different approaches to appreciate and interpret the cinematic and literary arts.
Writing intensive

 

JAPN 111 01.  Beginning Japanese I
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Introduces the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives. 

 

JAPN 112F 01.  Beginning Japanese II
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Japanese 111 with a C- or higher or placement.
Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 

JAPN 230 01. Topics:  Advanced Instruction in Japanese
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite:  Japanese 211 with a C- or higher or placement
This course offers continuing instruction in Japanese for students who have completed Japanese 211 or above. Instruction will be tailored to the needs of students who have three or more semesters of Japanese.  Students who would otherwise register for Japanese 212, 311, or 312 should enroll in this class. 

 

JAPN 270.  CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
1 credit
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Japanese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

JAPN 370.  CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
1 credit
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Japanese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

 

POLI 210SC East Asian Politics
4 credits
Yu, Bin

The course introduces students to the political structure and dynamics of three major countries, or group of countries, in East Asia: Japan, China, and Korea (South Korea and North Korea). The role of the United States in regional politics is also discussed. The major objective is to make students familiar with their history, politics, and economy, their relationships with each other, and the impact of East Asia as whole on global affairs. There will be one mid-term exam, one final exam, and a take-home essay (7-9 pages).

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

The course allows students with intermediate level Chinese and Japanese language skills—completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112—to earn extra 1 credit connected to this course. Your work will be guided by your Language instructor. 

To register for the CLAC component, students must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 02/14

 

PSYC 280C 01. Psychology & Culture
4 credits
Crane, Lauren

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (or higher)
People cannot speak without having an accent from somewhere. In much the same way, people's psychological functioning is not accent-free.  This course highlights the extent to which all levels of psychological functioning, even "basic" ones, are grounded in culture-specific assumptions about what matters, what is "good”, and how the world works. Students are expected to emerge from this class with a sharpened ability to critique generalizations made about human psychology, a greater appreciation of interpersonal diversity, and a richer understanding of how their own ways of thinking and being derive from culture-bound experiences. Course requirements include exams, research projects, and class participation. This course contains substantial East Asian content and counts toward the East Asian Studies major/minor. This course also includes an optional “Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum” (CLAC) component.

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