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English - Fall 2014

English 100 – English for Non-Native Speakers
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisite: Departmental permission required
English for Non-Native Speakers is an introductory course in reading, writing, and speaking skills for students whose first language is something other than English.  Course work will include essays, presentations, and a research project, but will be adjusted to meet the needs of the current group of students.  The class emphasizes an introduction to American culture and college life as well as language skills.  Departmental permission required.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Staff

English 101 introduces writing on the college level.  Its purpose is to foster the skills necessary to produce coherent, persuasive prose: developing ideas thoroughly, using rhetorical strategies appropriate to subject and audience, focusing and supporting a thesis, structuring well developed paragraphs, generating mature and effective sentences, choosing precise and expressive language, and observing the conventions of written prose. Individual sections employ a variety of techniques for inculcating standards of good prose, but all 101 classes require a variety of writing assignments including paragraphs and short essays written in and out of class (about 4000 words in total) and a short research paper designed to introduce techniques of library research and documentation (about 2000 words).

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

This course has been designed to aid in your development into a confident, responsible and persuasive writer.  By the end of this course, students will:
(1) develop competency in all stages of the writing process
(2) develop critical thinking and reading skills
(3) develop a writing standard consistent with the MLA style guide

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

This course will teach the writing process through essays, extensive class discussion and workshopping, reading, and journal-keeping. Students will improve their academic writing skills, including grammar and punctuation, and will learn that there is much more to successful writing than the dreaded five-paragraph essay. Along the way, students should learn more about themselves, their world and the many different values of writing, including the revolutionary concept that writing can be fun. Class requirements include six papers, class attendance and participation, regular journal writing and frequent in-class writing.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

In this course, students will work to produce mature, coherent, persuasive prose on various topics. There will be a blend of assignments, from smaller ones that allow students to refine the finer points of their writing process to larger ones that allow them to practice their research skills and interpretive abilities. For this section, students will also be required to hold several one-to-one sessions with an advisor from the Writing Center.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: Relationships in the Age of Technology
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Our primary goal in this course is, of course, to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose.  To that end, we will do a lot of writing of various kinds, focusing on critical thinking, organizational skills, sentence structure, style, and argumentation.  After a series of assignments of growing length and complexity, we will ultimately complete a short researched argument.  Success in the course will depend on thoughtful reading, active participation and serious work through the process of revision as well as, of course, on the quality of the final papers.  Our readings will center around the way our social networking, our dependency on the internet, and our love of our gadgets may affect the way we think of ourselves and the way we form and define our relationships to other people.  Writing Intensive.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
MacDonald, Ian

Introductory writing facilitates students’ entry into the intellectual life of the university by helping them to become more capable and independent readers and writers. With its small section size and emphases on critical analysis, the writing process, revision, collaboration, and research, the course leads students to develop specific skills and general habits of mind important to their future academic success.

This class will be arranged around the theme of monsters. Monsters aren’t just the ghouls peeking out from the shadows of your closet. There is a great deal of information stored in these particular cultural exhibits. With the recent rash of interest in various spooky beasties—be it vampires, zombies, witches, ghosts, or whatever that thing was in Cloverfield—it’s worth asking why this trend has grown and what it says about media, politics, shifts in cultural behavior, economics and globalization, and more. Why, for example, has the U.S. gone gaga over vampires--an antiquated creature from an older age--at the dawn of the twenty-first century? What lies beneath that from which we run away or, sometimes, run to? There’s more to these vengeful killers and dark gremlins than just fangs and popcorn-scattering scares—the monster is never what it seems. It’s always, we will discover, what scares us most about ourselves being held before us like a ghostly mirror. So if you still keep the lights on to fend off the denizens beneath the bed, come join us; looking at the history of monsters from the nineteenth century to today through novels, films, short stories and memes, we’ll write the fears away one essay at a time.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing  
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

This writing course considers controversial topics, and it does so for the very reason that many wise people avoid such matters altogether:  thorny subjects can trigger passions that reduce our chances of being heard.  But that difficulty can work to our advantage when it comes to writing development because navigating the potential for offense involves a good number of the skills that a course like this aims to cultivate, skills like careful audience management, critical assessment of the facts, and judicious use of the rhetorical techniques that can shape the way audiences receive a claim.  We'll work on all these skills while considering the topics that can divide us.  In this writing-intensive course, we'll read a steady stream of articles to help us better understand free speech issues and social justice claims, we'll tackle five papers that test our argumentation skills, and we'll regularly seek out feedback from our peers to help us become effective and responsible global citizens.

 

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Taking intellectual and emotional risks lies at the heart of writing.  Testing your limits, stretching your intellectual and creative abilities, expanding the boundaries of your intellectual and emotional lives—this is the writer’s project.  You will only realize your full potential as a thinker and writer by doing more and better work than you ever thought possible, and, above all, by learning to take risks.  This course provides you the opportunities and the environment in which to take the risks necessary for thinking analytically and writing well.  English 101 is a composition course designed to give you intensive practice in the art of expository writing.  The course emphasizes the writing process and the development of clear and purposeful, well-focused writing, which addresses a well-defined audience.  English 101 will call on your analytical and organizational skills, as well as provide opportunities for you to enhance your ability to design and structure writing and to improve your technical expertise.  The course will focus on the conventions of academic discourse and selecting, integrating, and documenting sources.  This course is also designed to teach you how to read and write effectively at Wittenberg.  Also, it will help you to discover that reading and writing are not separate activities, but closely related ones.  The course is founded on the belief that learning to read, see, and think analytically is essential to becoming a proficient, accomplished writer.  Writing Intensive.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: The Art of Essay
4 semester hours
Smith, J. Fitzpatrick
This course is designed to illustrate the potential of the written word---the potential to present well-wrought ideas carefully and persuasively.  At once intensely personal and inevitable public, writing allows one to not simply describe but also create a world.  This course, then, will strengthen the mastery of the elements of style as it will assist in reconceiving our relationship to the world around us.  Focusing on both analytical and nonfiction essays, our readings will provide materials and models for our discussions and essays.  In addition to several short essays, the course’s requirements also include a commitment to discussion; this is not a lecture course, so the student is strongly encouraged to bring ideas, questions, insights and observations to each class meeting.  Ultimately, this course prepares the student to meet the expectations that you will encounter in your academic career and beyond:  you will be expected to read critically and thoughtfully, to organize your ideas into a coherent argument, and to present your thoughts with confidence and grace.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Ravenwood, Emily

Good writing requires good listening and critical thinking.  This course focuses on how to identify and read written discussions you might wish to take part in, and how to join in.  The textbook will give you pointers, and in-class writing exercises will give you practice.  Later in the term, we will read a variety of essays and articles and you will write formal papers responding to them and presenting your own viewpoint.  Since good critical thinking includes finding information you may lack to make a good evaluation or argument, we will also cover basic research tactics and how to find information using campus resources such as the library and general resources such as Google. Assignments will include in-class writing, at least one brief research presentation, and three formal essays. The first essay will be submitted, revised, and submitted again, and students will meet individually with the instructor during the term to discuss the revision process. At the end of the term, one paper will be expanded and submitted as a portfolio of the student’s progress.

 

ENGL 180A – “How Like a God”: Myth, Epic, and Metamorphosis
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce the student to the work of Greco-Roman myth.  With intensive readings of The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, and The Metamorphoses, this course not only will consider the various stories and ideas that myths construct and entail, but also will work to question the more modern myths by which we live today.  As a writing intensive section, this course will require a daily reading journal, several short essays, two examinations, and a final analytical paper.  The course will emphasize student engagement with the readings and ideas, so class sessions will entail lecture but rely heavily upon class participation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with the dominant myths of the ancients, as well as a broadened understanding of those myths by which we live—myths more naively known as reality.

 

ENGL 180A – Film Noir
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
Film noir, or “black film,” has been variously labeled as a period in film history, a style of film, and as a separate film genre with its own themes and conventions.  No matter how you define it, films labeled as film noir are “deeply unromantic” films that “take a sneaking delight in their displays of passion gone wrong and of murderous calculation confounded.”  This course will examine the distinctive “noir” visual style and the characteristic “noir” thematics of lives ruled by an unkind fate.  We will also trace the history of film noir from its origins in German expressionism and postwar nihilism, to its golden period in the 1940's and 1950's, and to its persistence through the rest of the 20th century in neo-noir and retro-noir.  We will also look at the debt that these films owe to what the French called “serie noir,” the searing crime and detective fiction of the 1930's, 40's, and 50's.  We will examine particularly closely the cultural work of these films and the questions film noir raises about the nature of masculinity, femininity, and homosexuality and their representations in film noir.  Writing intensive. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies

 

ENGL 180A – Demons, Devils and Hellfire
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
One way of grappling with the problems of irrational malice, unwarranted suffering, and general wrong-doing is to imagine a force of evil at work in the universe, and in the Western tradition, there is no more vivid way of conjuring up such a notion than with images of hell and its resident demons.  Once we’ve labeled and put a devilish face on these energies, though, a peculiar thing sometimes happens: despite their associations with all things abhorrent (or perhaps because of them), some of us find ourselves, truth be told, more than a little fascinated with these diabolical ideas, and this preoccupation with things devilish has consequently been responsible for unleashing some conspicuously exuberant works of literary imagination.  This class brings together a number of texts preoccupied with demons, devils, and hellfire including works from the medieval world (Dante’s Inferno), the early modern age (John Milton’s Paradise Lost), the Romantic period (William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell), and the 20th century (C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce); we will also consider the substantial inroads that diabolical forces have made in some contemporary films.  Throughout this course, we’ll use these various depictions of devils and the underworld to see how writers have attempted to account for some thorny aspects of human experience, and we’ll also devote part of our semester to learning the conventions associated with a variety of literary forms (poetry, novels, plays, film) and to sharpening our skills as readers of these types of expression.  There will be three exams, including a comprehensive final, as well as several papers in this writing intensive course.

 

ENGL 180A – Jane Goes to the Movies
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Jane Austen would probably be bemused (and amused) were she alive today to see the veritable entertainment empire that has sprung from her novels, which she self-deprecatingly described as “little bit[s] (two Inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush, [producing] little effect after much labour." In her metaphor she is a miniaturist, producing tiny portraits—but for over sixty years, her work has filled the big screen, with no signs of stopping any time soon.

In this course we will read the major novels of Jane Austen and view representative film and television adaptations of them.  Not only will we learn basic critical skills for reading fiction and viewing film, but we will find that our discussion of the novels will be illuminated by the choices made (and not made) by filmmakers.  We will also explore the continuing popularity of Jane Austen and her novels:  what does the current boom in Austen adaptations, sequels, prequels, etc. suggest about our own society’s values, desires, and anxieties?  We will also examine Austen’s life in various versions, as well as considering other fictions and films related to her work.  The graded work of the course will include several analytical papers, a final exam, quizzes, and a creative/analytical project.  Writing Intensive.  Cross-listed with Cinema Studies and Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 240 – Beginning Creative Writing
4 semester hours
DIXON PROFESSORSHIP STAFF

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Beginning course in creative writing – fiction, poetry and drama – the rudiments and beyond. First-year students by permission of instructor. This course is a prerequisite to all advanced creative writing courses. Writing intensive. Falls within the Words at Work category.

 

ENGL 241 – Beginning Journalism
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
This course provides a basic introduction to the practice and principles of journalism, with an emphasis on writing for newspapers. We will discuss news, features, entertainment stories, opinion and sports writing, as well as interviewing skills, ethics, copy-editing, headline writing, and other related topics. Students will be expected to meet deadlines, do frequent in-class writing exercises, and to thoughtfully and constructively respond to their classmates’ stories. Grades will be based on stories produced, occasional quizzes, and class participation.

 

ENGL 270A – Literary Form and Interpretation
4 semester hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
This introduction to literary studies will ask all the questions it should ask: Why do we read? How do we read? And even, what does it mean to read in a digital age where the death of the book is routinely prognosticated? We will review a variety of critical and theoretical approaches to these questions, drawing upon semiotics, postmodernism, feminism, cognitive studies, and the everyday reflections of contemporary writers and critics, such as Zadie Smith, Marilynne Robinson, and Jonathan Franzen.

But more importantly, we will look at how literature has answered important questions for us: what does it mean to love, and what does it mean to experience loss? It is hard to imagine more important work in the world than providing answers to these questions. And our work as literary critics and keen readers of the text is to understand just how literature works, how it produces its effects and how those effects are influenced by the historical, cultural, and literary contexts in which they emerge.

Historically, no form has better encapsulated both love and loss than the sonnet, and certainly we will take time to look at this form, and its poetic successors. And of course, prose fiction is where romance takes place, and we will not be able to explore the language of love unless we look at the key novels which gave it such narrative predominance in our culture. Fiction is also the narrative form where we have told most of the most harrowing stories of our contemporary age, and we will look at how this form confronts loss as well.

Throughout, you will read, discuss, write papers, keep reading journals, and at the end of the course, write an 8-10 page paper where you ask key questions about why and how we read. This course is writing intensive.

 

ENGL 280A – British Literary Genealogies: 'Who's He When He's at Home': Home, Nostalgia & British Literature
4 semester hours
Smith, J. Fitzpatrick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C or ENGL 270A
When Molly Bloom asks in Ulysses, 'Who's he when he's at home?', she's asking for more than a definition of a difficult word.  Rather, she touches on one of the central themes in British literature--the question of 'home'.  As a maritime force in the seventeenth century, a colonial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and a site of tremendous tensions around immigration in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Britain has a complicated history of affiliations and identities that seems to fall cleanly along this idea of home.  Themes related to the idea of home include the reliability of memory, the allure of nostalgia, the violent policing of national and cultural boundaries, and the significance of tradition.  Our readings will range widely, from Shakespeare to Samuel Beckett, and roughly spanning the centuries bracketed by the Queens Elizabeth, I and II.  In addition to regular short writings and a reading journal, the student will be responsible for a researched essay and a collaborative presentation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with British writers and literary traditions, as well as a sharpened understanding of the political, social, cultural, and artistic implications of that most basic of terms, 'home'.

 

ENGL 290A – American Literary Traditions: The American Immigrant
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisite:  ENGL 180A,  ENGL 190A/C or ENGL 270A
Hector St. Jean de Crévecoeur aka Michel Guillaume Jean de CrèvecÅ“ur (1735-1812) immigrated from France to Canada in 1755, and settled in New York state where he became a citizen, changed his name to Hector John St.-John, married an American and bought a farm. In 1782 he published a collection of 12 essays in a volume titled Letters from an American Farmer and in 1925, well after his death, an unpublished set of essays appeared, Sketches of Eighteenth Century America, or More Letters from an American Farmer.  The collections grapple with Crévecoeur’s most famous question “What is an American.” In this course we will examine the American immigrant experience.

We will begin by reading Crévecoeur, using him to explore one of the first definitions of the American Dream and to discuss the largest group of forced immigrants to America, Africans. Our early readings will ground an exploration of 20th and 21st century American writing through individual works by American immigrants.  Heavy Reading.

 

ENGL 320 – Advanced News Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite: ENGL 241
This course will focus on honing the skills needed for a career in journalism, with a heavy focus on producing publication-quality work.  Areas covered will include advanced news reporting and writing techniques, investigative journalism, editing, layout, writing for on-line publication, the state of American journalism today, and journalistic ethics and related issues.  We will learn by doing—in addition to regularly assigned stories, the class will produce and publish its own magazine.  Students will be in charge of every phase of this, from generating ideas to distributing the finished product.  In addition, students are strongly encouraged but not required to do an outside internship at Wittenberg’s Torch or a comparable journalistic organization. This course is designed for students serious about pursuing a career in journalism or a related field. The course is, obviously, writing intensive.

 

ENGL 327 – Advanced Rhetoric and Grammar
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

Prerequisite: Departmental permission required
This course examines the rhetorical canons of invention, organization, and style, using the last as a reason to investigate current syntactic conventions (how words, phrases, and clauses are combined into sentences). We will also consider how and why language use has changed through the years.

 

ENGL 335 – Words at Work: Introduction to Grant Writing
2 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce students to the basic procedures and components of grant proposals, including establishing organizational mission and credentials, identifying need, planning a basic budget, and offering a compelling description of the proposed project and how it will address the problem identified. We will pay special attention to writing skills valued in this kind of professional writing, such as a concise, lively style and scrupulous attention to detail. We will also learn the basics of how to research appropriate grantmakers for one’s project and hear from professionals in the field about their experiences. Students will work on a practice proposal and on a team-produced grant proposal package that may be submitted to a grantmaker for consideration. Writing Intensive.

 

English 341 – Advanced Poetry Writing
4 semester hours
Rambo, Jody

Prerequisite: ENGL 240
Jorie Graham says poems are “records of true risks taken by the soul of the speaker.” This workshop will create a space for writers to take such risks and to grow more familiar with the anatomy and texture of poetry: image, word, diction, voice, syntactical possibilities, and other matters of form such as line, stanza, punctuation, and page. In addition to writing a poem a week, students will choose a contemporary “mentor” poet to read closely and be guided by in an effort to access an individual and essential voice of their own. In addition, students will engage in workshop discussions of their poems, keep a poet’s notebook, give a presentation on their mentorship experience, and polish a final manuscript.

 

ENGL 353 – Anarchy for the U.K.: A Study of Romantic Literature
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A and ENGL 280A
This class considers the innovative and challenging writing of the Romantic-era as well as the remarkable historical events that helped to shape those texts.  We’ll take the anarchist theories of William Godwin as our touchstone as we examine the reformist ideas percolating in writings of the feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, the radical poet William Blake, the proto-Marxist Percy Shelley, and the mad, bad, and dangerous Lord Byron, among others.  These texts will help us to ask questions about political authority, about individual identity, and about the nature of divinity.  We have three exams and two papers, including one 15-page semester project, in this course.

 

ENGL 360 – Modern American Novel
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A and either ENGL 280A or ENGL 290A
Modernist literature is a literature of crisis, of chaos, and the dissolution of order.  Beginning in the nineteenth century, the world saw the dramatic shifts in religion, philosophy, literature, technology, and psychology that predicated the “modern condition.”  Among other horrors, hundreds of thousands died in two mechanized and dehumanizing world wars.  Countless thousands suffered in the ghettos that grew up around the new industrial plants, living bleak, alienated, and lonely lives among the millions.  Against this backdrop of crisis, the modern American novel emerged.  American writers embraced modernism’s restless interrogation of subjectivity and existence, its insistence on change, and its quest for an aesthetic solution to the crisis of modern and social disorder and psychic fragmentation.  As a central tenet of their quest, American modernists denounce the nineteenth century’s rationalism and positivism, and “(turn) toward nonlinear and increasingly formalist modes of artistic presentation in the search for new kinds of order” (Pearlman, “Modernism”).  This term we will puzzle out this modernist pursuit of a new aesthetic to order experience and to find what Wallace Stevens termed “what will suffice” as we struggle through the modern.  Finally, the modern American novel is ever new, dynamic, arresting, and one of the greatest literary experiments of all time. The course is writing intensive and requires journals, a final examination, and a research project.

 

ENGL 365 – Literary Immersion: George Eliot’s Middlemarch
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Virginia Woolf called it “one of the few English novels written for grown-up people.” Martin Amis and Julian Barnes (and not a few others) call it the greatest novel in the English language. Published in 1871-72, Middlemarch exemplifies both the realistic novel and the Victorian multi-plot novel, introducing us to a cross-section of nineteenth-century English village life. An idealistic heiress, a reform-minded young doctor, a self-righteous banker, a clueless squire, a willful artist, an ambitious beauty, a shriveled clergyman—we will meet them all and find, through Eliot’s steady gaze, a core humanity even in the worst of them. Reading responses/quizzes, a brief presentation on historical context, and a take-home final will constitute the graded work of the course, but our focus will be on reading and discussing this monumental and moving work. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 371 – World Literature in English: Africa, Asia and the Caribbean
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A, ENGL 280A or ENGL 290A
This course examines 20th and 21st century World Literatures from Africa, Asia and The Caribbean that respond to issues of identity, colonization and migration.  According to scholars Pin-Chia Feng and Kate Liu, “As English majors, we need to know that ‘English’ is not always British, and ‘American.”

In this World Literature course we will read selected literature from Africa, Asia and The Caribbean that share studied issues of the influences of colonization, imperialism and the quest for identity.

 

ENGL 372A – Bad Girls: From Eve to Mary (Wollstonecraft)
4 semester hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A and ENGL 280A /Non-majors must have junior standing
This course will examine the work of women writers from the medieval period to the early nineteenth century and will be organized around the most common tropes by which a woman becomes a “bad girl.” I am sure you know those “tropes” already, but to remind you (and to use their less vulgar incarnations) they are: the fallen woman, the shrew, the prostitute, the coquette, and the promiscuous woman. This year, the course will also add a new and modern category for female “acting out;” the mean girl.  The course will begin by looking at the original “bad girl,” Eve, and will examine in detail a period of particularly virulent misogynist attacks during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, all played out through an examination of Eve’s original transgression. We will look at the feminist responses to these debates, including—I would argue--Milton's representation of Eve in Paradise Lost. 

We will then go back to discuss the shrew or masculinized woman, starting with Chaucer’s Wife of Bath and Margery Kempe’s account of her spiritual life and concluding in Margaret Cavendish’s early foray into science fiction The Blazing World (1665).  We will then move on to the figure of the prostitute, focusing primarily on the Restoration stage and the work of Aphra Behn. From there, we will examine the coquette or the tease, a figure of womanhood intrinsically connected—interestingly enough—with the birth and development of the novel in the eighteenth century. We will also take on a modern category for female transgression—“the mean girl”—by exploring the biting, sometimes catty, satire of Frances Burney’s play, The Witlings. We will conclude with the figure of the promiscuous woman, focusing on the overtly feminist work of Mary Wollstonecraft and how that intersected with the complexities of her own troubled, romantic history. As a coda to the class, we will look at Frankenstein, written by Wollstonecraft’s daughter, Mary Shelley, and examine how the “bad girl” goes underground in this novel, strangely taking the form of a masculine monster.

The course will include a midterm and final, one shorter paper (@five pages) and one researched paper (12-15 pages.) There will also be response papers along the way and the research paper will include a personal component. Writing intensive.

Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 403 – Advanced Projects in Creative Writing
4 semester hours

DIXON PROFESSORSHIP STAFF

Prerequisite:  ENGL 240
Extending skills learned in English 240 by focusing on a specific genre of creative writing determined by the recipient of the Dixon Professorship. Class activities will include reading and discussing the forms and techniques of that genre as well as extensive workshop critiques of students’ own work. Writing Intensive. Falls within the Words at Work category.

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