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History - Fall 2014

HIST 105 C/H 1W.  Pre-Modern World History
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Christian

Prerequisite:  none.   
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost?  Writing Intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 106C/H 01   Modern World
4.00 credits
Paddison, Josh
Prerequisite:  none.   

This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all of the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 111H 1.   Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, A.

Prerequisite:  FYS Only – Advising Section Linked on Tuesdays Noon -1:00
The origins of medieval Europe are grounded in the world of Late Antiquity. This class begins with the last of the Western Roman Emperors by surveying the “barbarian” kingdoms that had been created in the fourth and fifth centuries. Essential to understanding Europe is the relationship between East and West. Starting with a dominant Byzantium in the early part of our course, we’ll examine ups and downs in the East/West relationship in the ninth and early twelfth centuries and their antagonistic relationship after 1204 and the sack of Constantinople. Essential to this story are the lives of women and religious minorities, such as Jews, Muslims, and pagans. Those stories will be woven in with the traditional highlights of the Middle Ages, such as Charlemagne’s ascension as Holy Roman Emperor, the Viking raids throughout Europe, the rise of the Normans and the conquest of England, the reform papacy and the Crusades, and the beginning of the Renaissance. Medieval Europe changed drastically over the thousand years studied in this course, and we will attempt to both understand the events and processes that contributed to that change as well as the shape of Europe at the end of our period.   This course counts toward the PAST minor. 

 

HIST 121H: United States History I
4.00 credits
Paddison, Josh

An introduction to U.S. history from pre-1492 through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. Using a mix of recent books by historians and primary sources created by people who lived during the era--including speeches, sermons, memoirs, diaries, laws, maps, cartoons, paintings, photographs, newspaper advertisements, popular songs, architecture, and material culture--we will explore the social, cultural, political, and economic history of early America. Not writing intensive. Assessment will focus on the students’ ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.

 

HIST  122H 01.  U. S.  History 1877 to Present
4.00 credits   
Wood, M.

Prerequisite:   none.
How did new technology change the lives of average Americans in the late nineteenth century?  What role did American women play in World War I?  How did the Civil Rights Movement change American society?  How and why did Harry Truman decide to use the atomic bomb on Japan?  How did Americans react to the Vietnam War?  These are just a few of the questions we will discuss in HIST 122, a survey of some of the major themes, topics and issues in American history from 1877 to the present.  We will focus on selected social, political, diplomatic, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the nation, its varied regions and peoples.  This course will consist of lecture, class discussion other assignments.  Attendance is very important.  Students will grapple with problems of historical perspective and interpretation, and are expected to participate in discussion, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all assignments.  (This course, or an equivalent course such as HIST 126 or HIST 127, is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.  See the history department chair for information on other possible equivalent courses.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST 122H 02.  U. S.  History 1877 to Present
4.00 credits   
Wood, M.

Prerequisite:   none.
How did new technology change the lives of average Americans in the late nineteenth century?  What role did American women play in World War I?  How did the Civil Rights Movement change American society?  How and why did Harry Truman decide to use the atomic bomb on Japan?  How did Americans react to the Vietnam War?  These are just a few of the questions we will discuss in HIST 122, a survey of some of the major themes, topics and issues in American history from 1877 to the present.  We will focus on selected social, political, diplomatic, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the nation, its varied regions and peoples.  This course will consist of lecture, class discussion and other assignments.  Attendance is very important.  Students will grapple with problems of historical perspective and interpretation, and are expected to participate in discussion, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all assignments.  (This course, or an equivalent course such as HIST 126 or HIST 127, is required for the Integrated Social Studies Major.  See the history department chair for information on other possible equivalent courses.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department. 

 

HIST201H 1W.  Ghosts, Monsters, Demons & Aliens in US History
4.00 credits
Paddison, Josh

Prerequisite:  None
This class will explore what Americans’ fascination with ghosts, monsters, demons, and aliens reveal about changing attitudes, beliefs, and anxieties from the colonial period from the present, paying special attention to the religious dimensions of these phenomena. Whether conceived of as real or imaginary, friendly or terrifying, these otherworldly creatures embody some of Americans’ deepest hopes and fears about God, science, sin, the afterlife, the nature of evil, the natural world, humanity’s place in the cosmos, the past and the future, and the Other. In addition to reading books and articles by contemporary historians, we will examine sermons, folk tales, spiritualist poetry, alien abduction narratives, ghost stories, superhero comic books, demonology manuals, “Satanic” rock music, and horror movies and television shows. Along the way, we will learn about a wide variety of religious traditions, including Puritanism, Roman Catholicism, Judaism, evangelical Protestantism, Buddhism, Mormonism, the Lakota Ghost Dance, Louisiana Voodoo, the Nation of Islam, Scientology, and Heaven’s Gate. Writing intensive. Students will write several short papers as well as a research paper on a topic of their own design.

 

HIST 202H 2W.  Vietnam War
4.00 credits
Wood, Molly

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E and  Sophomore standing.  

This course will introduce students to different modes of historical writing and to problems in historical interpretation by exploring the American experience in Vietnam in the twentieth century.  We will seek to understand the ways in which historians have explained and interpreted the Vietnam War, as well as the reasons why those interpretations have changed over time.  Some of the questions we will address:  How do historians write about a topic as complex as war?  What are the differences between a political and social history of war?  What are the origins of U.S. involvement in Vietnam?  What are the primary sources historians use to understand the American wartime experience?  How useful are memoirs and novels for understanding the American experience?  How important is it for historians of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam to understand “Vietnamese perspectives?”  What are the “rules” of writing history?  This course will consist mainly of class discussion of reading assignments.  Attendance is absolutely essential, as is the timely completion of reading assignments.  Students are expected to take an active part in class, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in the reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all written and oral assignments. Writing intensive.

 

HIST 203C 1W.  Negro Leagues
4. 00 credits
Rosenberg, S.

Prerequisite:  ENG101E and Sophomore standing.
The course will focus on the Negro Leagues that existed in the United States from the early 20th century until the late 1960s. We will also explore the experience of black baseball players both before and after the period of segregation in the United States. While it is essential that we come to grips with the broader political, social, and economic institutions that supported racial segregation, the main focus of this course is to expose the lives that black baseball players made for themselves. In exploring the lives of African-American baseball players, we will focus on an emerging culture and the evolution of race relations. Of particular interest will be the few successful Negro Leagues that operated from 1919 through the 1940s and the long process of breaking baseball's color barrier from 1946 through the 1960s.  This course is designed to teach students the basic skills of researching and writing a historical paper. Assessment will be based on a book review, two take home exams, and the main component of the grade will be based on the research assignments and final paper. Writing intensive.

 

HIST 231S: Constitutional History I
4.00 Credits
Taylor, T.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing recommended. 
An examination of the English and colonial roots of the American constitution; the creation and ratification of the constitution in the 1780s; the origins of the Bill of Rights; the constitution’s application and evolution in the early republic; and the role played by constitutional law in the mid-nineteenth century ruptures over slavery and Civil War. Required books include Michael Les Benedict The Blessings of Liberty and Sources in American Constitutional Law. Assessment methods include quizzes, tests, and debates.  

 

HIST 240H 1W: The Crusades
4.00 credits                                                   
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite:  none.
The Crusades continue to cast a long shadow over the history of the world. Recent political events have highlighted the importance of this conflict between Muslims and Christians has had on world events. This course will contextualize the Crusades in the medieval world by examining the following questions: Why did medieval people go on Crusade? What were the motives and experiences of the Crusaders? How did the Muslims view the Crusaders? How have scholars interpreted the Crusades? Students will read primary sources from the Crusades, as well as different interpretations of the Crusades, their history and their impact. Students will write a several short essays, two essay exams, as well as other shorter assignments, and make presentations. Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST253C/H  1W.  Soviet Russia
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris
Prerequisite:  none.
Russia in this period is fully enmeshed in European and world history. Over the course of this class we will see Soviet troops in Berlin, as well Soviet activity throughout the world.  Russia also goes through a series of dramatic changes in this period from the amazing events of two revolutions in 1917 to the conservative reaction under Stalin, and repetitions of those cycles of reform and reaction throughout the twentieth century. The history of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics will change the history of the rest of the world, and as such, is a vital component in understanding not only the events of the twentieth century, but our twenty-first century as well.
Writing Intensive

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 309 1W.  Eurasian Nomads in the Ancient and Medieval World
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
Eurasian nomads are part of a variety of histories and historiographies in China, Russia, India, the Middle East, and Europe. But in every one of those cases they primarily exist as an “other,” the “outsider” who raids the settled empire, the “barbarian” who ravages civilization. This class will attempt to change that perspective and focus on the nomads themselves as the actors. Over the course of the semester the class will acquire an understanding of nomadic society and traditions, as well as the various cultures involved in the regions and periods under consideration. They will do in-depth research on one particular steppe culture or people and present that material to the class, with the goal of helping to understand who these Eurasian nomad are, why they acted the way they did, and why history and historians traditionally portray them negatively.   Writing intensive. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 312 1W.   Age of Cathedrals
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy     

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
One of the most enduring images of the medieval world is the cathedral. Have you ever wondered why medieval people felt compelled to create such monumental structures? How did they build cathedrals? Who built them? This course will explore the society that produced these magnificent monuments. Our discussion will begin with the art and society of the period preceding the Age of Cathedrals: the Romanesque.  Key to our discussion will be the pilgrimage churches that came to cover much of France and Northern Spain. How did faith and religious practice, as well as social and economic factors, contribute to the construction of these churches? Next we will examine how the Romanesque period transformed into the age of Gothic. Again the focus will be not only the artistic and aesthetic changes, but what economic, social and political changes led to the construction of cathedrals such as Chartres, St. Denis, Notre Dame, Amiens and Rheims. Why were cathedrals designed to capture light and to seem to ascend toward heaven? How do cathedrals reflect intellectual and philosophical developments of the central Middle Ages? Finally we will consider what impact cathedrals had on medieval civilization. How do cathedrals reflect the social and cultural changes that characterized the twelfth and thirteenth centuries?  Students will write three short papers, an in-depth research paper, and a synthetical essay. They will present their research to the class at the end of the semester.  Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 372 Race in South Africa and the U.S .
4.00 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
This course will compare the political, economic, and cultural motivations behind the construction of racially discriminatory systems in the United States and South Africa. White settlers in both the United States and South Africa turned to the exploitation of slave labor; why did they do this and how did they justify it? After the abolition of slavery each society developed new forms of institutional racism, Jim Crow and Apartheid. We will also devote a considerable amount of our attention to the responses of African-Americans and Black South Africans to these systems. In our analysis of their responses, we will explore why certain communities opted for violent and non-violent measures. We will also explore why some strategies for equality were successful for one group and not the other. This class will conclude with an examination of the state of race relations today. Grading will be based on: Class participation, short papers based on readings and exams. Writing intensive.

 

HIST 411 1W.   Senior Seminar
4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:  Senior history majors only and HIST 202 and HIST 203 and at least 8 credit hours of 300 level History courses.
This capstone to your history experience allows you to demonstrate your knowledge of historical method, historiography, and research skills.  You will research and write a long paper based on previous historical coursework, present that research in an oral presentation, and engage in discussions with other students about the nature and practice of history.  Papers, small assignments, tests, and in-class discussion constitute the graded coursework.   Writing intensive.

 

HIST 490 00.  Independent Study
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

HIST 491 00.   Internship
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

 

HIST 499 00.   Senior Honors Thesis
0.00-8.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

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