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Pre Modern and Ancient World Studies - Fall 2014

ARCH 103N Introduction to Archaeology
4 hours
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:  None
This course provides an introduction to the history, methods, theory, and broader social context of modern archaeological practice. As a field dedicated to the study of the human past through the examination of material remains, the course examines a variety of methods such as scientific excavation, satellite imaging, materials analysis, paleopathology, ethnography, underwater archaeology, and landscape archaeology. In this class, we will explore some of the major questions that interest archeologists now, how these questions compare to archaeological work in previous generations, and the sources of evidence used to investigate the questions. ARCH 103 introduces minors to the field of archaeology and provides a foundation for advanced classes in anthropology, archaeology, geology, history, and religion. Two field excavation days, or laboratory days are part of the course requirements. 

 

ART 110H  – Art History I
4 credit hours
Gimenez-Berger, Alejandra – Koch Hall

No prerequisite.
A selective chronological survey of architecture, painting, sculpture and decorative arts from the birth of art in the Prehistoric period through its development in the Middle Ages, with an emphasis on the Western tradition. 

 

ENGL 180A – “How Like a God”: Myth, Epic, and Metamorphosis
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce the student to the work of Greco-Roman myth.  With intensive readings of The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, and The Metamorphoses, this course not only will consider the various stories and ideas that myths construct and entail, but also will work to question the more modern myths by which we live today.  As a writing intensive section, this course will require a daily reading journal, several short essays, two examinations, and a final analytical paper.  The course will emphasize student engagement with the readings and ideas, so class sessions will entail lecture but rely heavily upon class participation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with the dominant myths of the ancients, as well as a broadened understanding of those myths by which we live—myths more naively known as reality.

 

ENGL 180A – Demons, Devils and Hellfire
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
One way of grappling with the problems of irrational malice, unwarranted suffering, and general wrong-doing is to imagine a force of evil at work in the universe, and in the Western tradition, there is no more vivid way of conjuring up such a notion than with images of hell and its resident demons.  Once we’ve labeled and put a devilish face on these energies, though, a peculiar thing sometimes happens: despite their associations with all things abhorrent (or perhaps because of them), some of us find ourselves, truth be told, more than a little fascinated with these diabolical ideas, and this preoccupation with things devilish has consequently been responsible for unleashing some conspicuously exuberant works of literary imagination.  This class brings together a number of texts preoccupied with demons, devils, and hellfire including works from the medieval world (Dante’s Inferno), the early modern age (John Milton’s Paradise Lost), the Romantic period (William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell), and the 20th century (C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce); we will also consider the substantial inroads that diabolical forces have made in some contemporary films.  Throughout this course, we’ll use these various depictions of devils and the underworld to see how writers have attempted to account for some thorny aspects of human experience, and we’ll also devote part of our semester to learning the conventions associated with a variety of literary forms (poetry, novels, plays, film) and to sharpening our skills as readers of these types of expression.  There will be three exams, including a comprehensive final, as well as several papers in this writing intensive course.

 

ENGL 280A – British Literary Genealogies: 'Who's He When He's at Home': Home, Nostalgia & British Literature
4 semester hours
Smith, J. Fitzpatrick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C or ENGL 270A
When Molly Bloom asks in Ulysses, 'Who's he when he's at home?', she's asking for more than a definition of a difficult word.  Rather, she touches on one of the central themes in British literature--the question of 'home'.  As a maritime force in the seventeenth century, a colonial power in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and a site of tremendous tensions around immigration in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Britain has a complicated history of affiliations and identities that seems to fall cleanly along this idea of home.  Themes related to the idea of home include the reliability of memory, the allure of nostalgia, the violent policing of national and cultural boundaries, and the significance of tradition.  Our readings will range widely, from Shakespeare to Samuel Beckett, and roughly spanning the centuries bracketed by the Queens Elizabeth, I and II.  In addition to regular short writings and a reading journal, the student will be responsible for a researched essay and a collaborative presentation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with British writers and literary traditions, as well as a sharpened understanding of the political, social, cultural, and artistic implications of that most basic of terms, 'home'.

 

ENGL 372A – Bad Girls: From Eve to Mary (Wollstonecraft)
4 semester hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequisites:  ENGL 270A and ENGL 280A /Non-majors must have junior standing
This course will examine the work of women writers from the medieval period to the early nineteenth century and will be organized around the most common tropes by which a woman becomes a “bad girl.” I am sure you know those “tropes” already, but to remind you (and to use their less vulgar incarnations) they are: the fallen woman, the shrew, the prostitute, the coquette, and the promiscuous woman. This year, the course will also add a new and modern category for female “acting out;” the mean girl.  The course will begin by looking at the original “bad girl,” Eve, and will examine in detail a period of particularly virulent misogynist attacks during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, all played out through an examination of Eve’s original transgression. We will look at the feminist responses to these debates, including—I would argue--Milton's representation of Eve in Paradise Lost. 

We will then go back to discuss the shrew or masculinized woman, starting with Chaucer’s Wife of Bath and Margery Kempe’s account of her spiritual life and concluding in Margaret Cavendish’s early foray into science fiction The Blazing World (1665).  We will then move on to the figure of the prostitute, focusing primarily on the Restoration stage and the work of Aphra Behn. From there, we will examine the coquette or the tease, a figure of womanhood intrinsically connected—interestingly enough—with the birth and development of the novel in the eighteenth century. We will also take on a modern category for female transgression—“the mean girl”—by exploring the biting, sometimes catty, satire of Frances Burney’s play, The Witlings. We will conclude with the figure of the promiscuous woman, focusing on the overtly feminist work of Mary Wollstonecraft and how that intersected with the complexities of her own troubled, romantic history. As a coda to the class, we will look at Frankenstein, written by Wollstonecraft’s daughter, Mary Shelley, and examine how the “bad girl” goes underground in this novel, strangely taking the form of a masculine monster.

The course will include a midterm and final, one shorter paper (@five pages) and one researched paper (12-15 pages.) There will also be response papers along the way and the research paper will include a personal component.

Writing intensive. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

HIST 105 C/H 1W.  Pre-Modern World History
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Christian

Prerequisite:  none.   
Pre-Modern world history is fundamentally about the interconnectivity of the global system. In this class we will discuss kings, emperors, and philosophers from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas in addition to how the kingdoms and empires of the world interacted during this period. Key topics include the development of empire from Persia to China to Rome, the migrations of steppe peoples from Mongolia into Europe over the course of a thousand years, and the religious interactions (and their sometimes violent conflicts) in Eurasia and Africa that resulted in the spread of Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. In addition to discussing happenings within various kingdoms and fledgling states of the world, this class, specifically in lecture and discussion, is designed to look at how those kingdoms interacted with one another and what the consequences were—culturally, religiously, and economically. What was gained, and what lost?  Writing Intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 111H 1.   Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Livingstone, A.

Prerequisite:  FYS Only – Advising Section Linked on Tuesdays Noon -1:00
The origins of medieval Europe are grounded in the world of Late Antiquity. This class begins with the last of the Western Roman Emperors by surveying the “barbarian” kingdoms that had been created in the fourth and fifth centuries. Essential to understanding Europe is the relationship between East and West. Starting with a dominant Byzantium in the early part of our course, we’ll examine ups and downs in the East/West relationship in the ninth and early twelfth centuries and their antagonistic relationship after 1204 and the sack of Constantinople. Essential to this story are the lives of women and religious minorities, such as Jews, Muslims, and pagans. Those stories will be woven in with the traditional highlights of the Middle Ages, such as Charlemagne’s ascension as Holy Roman Emperor, the Viking raids throughout Europe, the rise of the Normans and the conquest of England, the reform papacy and the Crusades, and the beginning of the Renaissance. Medieval Europe changed drastically over the thousand years studied in this course, and we will attempt to both understand the events and processes that contributed to that change as well as the shape of Europe at the end of our period.   This course counts toward the PAST minor. 

 

HIST 240H 1W: The Crusades
4.00 credits                                                   
Livingstone, Amy

Prerequisite:  none.
The Crusades continue to cast a long shadow over the history of the world. Recent political events have highlighted the importance of this conflict between Muslims and Christians has had on world events. This course will contextualize the Crusades in the medieval world by examining the following questions: Why did medieval people go on Crusade? What were the motives and experiences of the Crusaders? How did the Muslims view the Crusaders? How have scholars interpreted the Crusades? Students will read primary sources from the Crusades, as well as different interpretations of the Crusades, their history and their impact. Students will write a several short essays, two essay exams, as well as other shorter assignments, and make presentations. Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 309 1W.  Eurasian Nomads in the Ancient and Medieval World
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
Eurasian nomads are part of a variety of histories and historiographies in China, Russia, India, the Middle East, and Europe. But in every one of those cases they primarily exist as an “other,” the “outsider” who raids the settled empire, the “barbarian” who ravages civilization. This class will attempt to change that perspective and focus on the nomads themselves as the actors. Over the course of the semester the class will acquire an understanding of nomadic society and traditions, as well as the various cultures involved in the regions and periods under consideration. They will do in-depth research on one particular steppe culture or people and present that material to the class, with the goal of helping to understand who these Eurasian nomad are, why they acted the way they did, and why history and historians traditionally portray them negatively.   Writing intensive. This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

HIST 312 1W.   Age of Cathedrals
4.00 credits
Livingstone, Amy     

Prerequisite:  ENGL101E, Junior Standing and one course in history or permission of instructor.
One of the most enduring images of the medieval world is the cathedral. Have you ever wondered why medieval people felt compelled to create such monumental structures? How did they build cathedrals? Who built them? This course will explore the society that produced these magnificent monuments. Our discussion will begin with the art and society of the period preceding the Age of Cathedrals: the Romanesque.  Key to our discussion will be the pilgrimage churches that came to cover much of France and Northern Spain. How did faith and religious practice, as well as social and economic factors, contribute to the construction of these churches? Next we will examine how the Romanesque period transformed into the age of Gothic. Again the focus will be not only the artistic and aesthetic changes, but what economic, social and political changes led to the construction of cathedrals such as Chartres, St. Denis, Notre Dame, Amiens and Rheims. Why were cathedrals designed to capture light and to seem to ascend toward heaven? How do cathedrals reflect intellectual and philosophical developments of the central Middle Ages? Finally we will consider what impact cathedrals had on medieval civilization. How do cathedrals reflect the social and cultural changes that characterized the twelfth and thirteenth centuries?  Students will write three short papers, an in-depth research paper, and a synthetical essay. They will present their research to the class at the end of the semester.  Writing intensive.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

PHIL 310 1W.  Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
4.00 credits
Reed

Prerequisite:  One prior course in PHIL or permission of instructor.
This course is an introduction to the historical method of philosophical reflection and an introduction to the philosophers of a particular period and a particular tradition (ancient Greek to medieval European).  As part of the first goal, we will observe the historical nature of philosophical thinking, i.e., the way it develops historically, not by accident but by its very nature.  We will trace one tradition of answers to questions variously answered by four particular notions (which themselves are reformulated over and over again):  (1) the notion that abstractions (like geometrical figures and the periodic table of elements) are the true objects of knowledge; (2) the notion that it is sometimes very difficult if not impossible to do what you know is good and not to do what you know is bad; (3) the notion that to be real and to be excellent are the same, i.e., that being and goodness are identical; and (4) the notion that the soul is immortal and lives on after the body decays and ceases.  Students will take a mid-term and a final exam and write four papers.  Writing intensive.

 

Religion 221R  1W   Understanding the Old Testament
(4 semester hours)
Kaiser, Barbara

Pre-requisite:  NONE
This course is designed especially for religion majors, pre-theological students, and others with a serious interest in biblical studies. We will attempt to place the Old Testament literature in its historical context, understand the theological perspectives which shape the texts, develop methods of interpretation, and simply appreciate the artistry and inspiration of the Old Testament literature. Class sessions have lecture/discussion format. Students will take three exams and write a paper. Counts to PAST Minor. Writing intensive.

 

Religion 324R  1W Apocalyptic Vision in Ancient and Modern Literature 
(4 semester hours)
Kaiser

Prerequisite: one previous biblical course.
We will begin the semester with an analysis of ancient Jewish apocalyptic tests – Daniel, Enoch, and 2 Esdras.  Historical context and literary style of the Jewish texts will be the focus of our attention.  Second, we will consider apocalyptic literature of two sectarian groups, the Essenes and Christians.  During this part of the quarter we will read the War Rule from Qumran and Revelation and examine and respond to modern interpretations of the latter, such as views of the Branch Davidians of Waco.   Finally, we will consider apocalyptic aspects of English literature by examining such texts as poems of William Blake, Nathaniel West’s Day of the Locust and selected novels chosen by participants.  Students will be responsible for a research paper and several short presentations (theodicy debate, imaging ultimate states of good and evil, reporting on newspaper and magazine articles, etc.).  The class is conducted as a seminar with discussion, frequent student presentations, occasional lectures.  Writing intensive.

 

PAST 400 01.  Capstone Seminar
2.00 credits
Brooks-Hedstrom, D.
Prerequisite: Must be a junior or senior Pre Modern and Ancient Studies minor and have completed twelve hours of the PAST minor.

Capstone course in which the junior or senior Pre Modern and Ancient World Studies minor integrates the major strands of Pre Modern and Ancient World history, culture, religion and philosophy, and literature around a specified theme and writes an extensive research paper.

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