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English - Spring 2014

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: Theme: “Begging, Borrowing and Stealing.”
4 semester hours
Askeland, Lori

The quip “amateur poets borrow; professionals steal,” often attributed to the poet T.S. Eliot, suggests a potentially dangerous paradox. This course is designed to ask questions rooted in that misquotation:  what roles do copying and imitation play in learning, and the creation of new works of writing, art, music—and life in general?  Hip hop, street art, scientific progress, and college papers all depend on borrowing.  So what does it mean to write an “original” piece, as opposed to something that is “derivative”—that just “feels like” stealing?  What is “plagiarism,” and what is “allusion,” what is “sampling”—and are they that different?  These are the kinds of questions we will be asking all term.  Obviously, we may not come to any clear consensus on these questions, but it’s my hope that by asking these questions you will: arrive at a richer understanding of your own writing/creative process, learn to think more carefully about how to ethically work with the ideas /words of others, and better understand the academic rules that govern this process for college-level writing.  Writing Intensive. 

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Clemens, William

English 101 introduces writing on the college level. Its purpose is to foster the skills necessary to produce coherent prose: developing ideas thoroughly, using rhetorical strategies appropriate to subject and audience, focusing and supporting a thesis, structuring well developed paragraphs, generating mature and effective sentences, choosing precise and effective language, and observing the conventions of prose. Individual sections employ a variety of techniques for inculcating standards of good prose; but all 101 classes require a variety of writing assignments including paragraphs and short essays written in and out of class (about 4,000 words in total) and a short research paper designed to introduce techniques of library research and documentation (about 2,000 words).

A major technique of this 101 section toward inculcating standards of good prose is reading and writing about rock and responsibility as presented in disciplines like journalism and liberal arts and humanities, particularly history, literature, philosophy, and musicology. The section emphasizes advanced reading and writing about rock music in the USA and world from the textbook Rock and Roll, Print and Web magazines like Filter and Pitchfork.com,and journals and websites like Popular Music Studies and Rockhall.com. MLA style (not AP) is emphasized along with literary/film studies, i.e. A Visit from the Goon Squad: A Novel and Jailhouse Rock.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Fallon, D’Arcy

“Tell me what you eat and I’ll tell you who you are.”—Renowned gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, 1825
Food. We all eat it. We all need it.  Whether our favorite meal is tofutti ice cream or a big beef burrito from Chipotle’s, food is the engine that keeps us alive. But how much do we really know about what we’re putting in our bodies? It’s complicated. As the filmmakers note in the award-winning documentary film Food, Inc., “The way we eat has changed more in the last 50 years than in the previous 10,000.” In “Food for Thought,” we’ll look at the role food plays in agriculture, big business, ethics, culture, gender, politics, and cooking shows. 

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: Relationships in the Age of Technology
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Our primary goal in this course is, of course, to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose.  To that end, we will do a lot of writing of various kinds, focusing on critical thinking, organizational skills, sentence structure, style, and argumentation.  After a series of assignments of growing length and complexity, we will ultimately complete a short researched argument.  Success in the course will depend on thoughtful reading, active participation and serious work through the process of revision as well as, of course, on the quality of the final papers.  Our readings will center around the way our social networking, our dependency on the internet, and our love of our gadgets may affect the way we think of ourselves and the way we form and define our relationships to other people.  Writing Intensive.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing  
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

This course considers the two topics that we're cautioned against discussing at parties—politics and religion—and we'll take them on for the same reason that many smart people avoid them:  they're difficult to handle without some folks becoming passionately invested in one position or another.  Topics like these can be tackled without causing offense, but doing so requires a careful attention to audience, a solid grasp of some facts that can establish points of agreement, and a judicious application of writing skills—all things that a writing course might teach.  We'll work on all three of these qualities while considering matters of church and state, evolution in public schools, and freedom of speech.  We'll read some influential writers on these topics, write five papers, and workshop our drafts together in class.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: The Digital Humanist
4 semester hours
MacDonald, Katharine

This course will examine what it means to be a human, and a humanist, in the digital age. By approaching a range of texts and conceptions of what it means to interact textually and culturally, we will explore the interplay between the physical and digital landscapes we encounter daily.

By offering an introduction into writing across different types of media, we will engage with how we position our own identities differently in digital and physical space, we will lay the groundwork for discussions of how we receive, interpret, and produce both digital and traditional texts. As this is a Composition course, writing will be our primary emphasis, but we will pay particular attention to the ways in which compositions take shape in a variety of ways across media.

How does our unique personality, background, and perspective influence the way we consume digital media? What do we do with that media? How do our choices in searches and the way we present ourselves online constitute rhetorical choices? How do these choices in turn influence our future? What use is a traditional text in the digital age? When are the tools provided by a digital text preferable, and when are they unnecessary? How have reading and writing in a digital environment changed the way we see ourselves?

We will consider these questions and others as we explore Digital Humanities with a focus on writing clear, interesting, precise, evocative essays that can be adapted to both traditional and digital formats.

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

In this course, students will work to produce mature, coherent, persuasive prose on various topics. There will be a blend of assignments, from smaller ones that allow students to refine the finer points of their writing process to larger ones that allow them to practice their research skills and interpretive abilities. For this section, students will also be required to hold several one-to-one sessions with an advisor from the Writing Center.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

This course will teach the writing process through essays, extensive class discussion and workshopping, reading, and journal-keeping. Students will improve their academic writing skills, including grammar and punctuation, and will learn that there is much more to successful writing than the dreaded five-paragraph essay. Along the way, students should learn more about themselves, their world and the many different values of writing, including the revolutionary concept that writing can be fun. Class requirements include six papers, class attendance and participation, regular journal writing and frequent in-class writing.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Ravenwood, Emily

This course focuses on critical thinking and writing. In order to write the best possible document, be it a description, argument, report or letter, one must be aware of facts, context, and audience.  To foster this awareness we will read essays by a variety of authors, and discuss in class both the issues they write about and the mechanics of how they do so.  Students will then apply what we have discovered to their writing.  Since good critical thinking includes finding information one may lack to make a good evaluation or argument, we will also cover basic research tactics and how to find information using campus resources such as the library and general resources such as Google.  Assignments will include in-class writing and five essays.  The first three essays will be submitted, revised, and submitted again, and students will meet individually with the instructor during the term to discuss the revision process.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing: The Art of Essay
4 semester hours
Smith, J. Fitzpatrick
This course is designed to illustrate the potential of the written word---the potential to present well-wrought ideas carefully and persuasively.  At once intensely personal and inevitable public, writing allows one to not simply describe but also create a world.  This course, then, will strengthen the mastery of the elements of style as it will assist in reconceiving our relationship to the world around us.  Focusing on both analytical and nonfiction essays, our readings will provide materials and models for our discussions and essays.  In addition to several short essays, the course’s requirements also include a commitment to discussion; this is not a lecture course, so the student is strongly encouraged to bring ideas, questions, insights and observations to each class meeting.  Ultimately, this course prepares the student to meet the expectations that you will encounter in your academic career and beyond:  you will be expected to read critically and thoughtfully, to organize your ideas into a coherent argument, and to present your thoughts with confidence and grace.

 

ENGL 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

This course has been designed to aid in your development into a confident, responsible and persuasive writer.  By the end of this course, students will:
(1) develop competency in all stages of the writing process
(2) develop critical thinking and reading skills
(3) develop a writing standard consistent with the MLA style guide

 

ENGL 180A – Film Noir
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
Film noir, or “black film,” has been variously labeled as a period in film history, a style of film, and as a separate film genre with its own themes and conventions.  No matter how you define it, films labeled as film noir are “deeply unromantic” films that “take a sneaking delight in their displays of passion gone wrong and of murderous calculation confounded.”  This course will examine the distinctive “noir” visual style and the characteristic “noir” thematics of lives ruled by an unkind fate.  We will also trace the history of film noir from its origins in German expressionism and postwar nihilism, to its golden period in the 1940's and 1950's, and to its persistence through the rest of the 20th century in neo-noir and retro-noir.  We will also look at the debt that these films owe to what the French called “serie noir,” the searing crime and detective fiction of the 1930's, 40's, and 50's.  We will examine particularly closely the cultural work of these films and the questions film noir raises about the nature of masculinity, femininity, and homosexuality and their representations in film noir.  Writing intensive. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies

 

ENGL 180A – Vampires in Fiction and Film
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
For millennia, creatures of the night have descended upon us to drink our blood, drain the life from us, and ignite our imaginations.  Succubi, lamiae, great white worms, and debonair counts all want one thing and one thing only--blood, for "the blood is the life."  Vampires have fascinated us from their first appearances as creatures of our nightmares, to their manifestations as the undead, swollen with grave gases, to the reluctant, beautiful, and sensitive outcasts we find in today's vampire novels and films.  This course will study vampires across time and cultures in fiction and film with a special emphasis on understanding what our obsessions with vampires can tell us about our cultures and ourselves.  What explains our obsession with vampires?  Why are we seeing an epidemic of vampire stories and movies?   And what explains the evolution of the vampire from a bloated, soulless corpse to a brooding, romantic hero?  Writing intensive.  Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 180A – Chick Flicks: From Melodrama to Rom-Com
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
From Bette Davis’ eyes and Joan Crawford’s shoulders to Rita Hayworth’s legs and Judy Garland’s ruby slippers, classic Hollywood stars defined, for better or worse, American ideas of modern womanhood.  But how much has really changed? This course will interrogate women’s changing roles as stars, as filmmakers, and as audience members. We will begin by learning some basic terminology and approaches to analyzing film as an art form.  Centering on the Classical Hollywood Cinema (1930-1960), with comparisons to contemporary films, we will then turn to a thematic and historical consideration of the various kinds of roles assigned to women in different films and film genres, from classic melodrama, screwball comedy, and film noir to today’s rom-com.  We will see how many classical Hollywood movies have created conformist role models for women even while subverting them.  Short readings may include work by Jeanine Basinger, Molly Haskell, Laura Mulvey, Mary Anne Doane, and Mick LaSalle, among others. The graded work of the course will consist of a shot-by-shot analysis, several short papers, and a final exam.  Writing Intensive.  Counts towards Cinema Studies minor and Women’s Studies minor.

 

ENGL 180A – Gender Trouble
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
In reading Shakespeare’s As You Like It, we come across the famous lines “All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players.”  The idea here sounds simple enough, but it can get complicated when men and women don’t always stick to their roles.  In fact, in the same play where we find these lines, we watch the heroine, Rosalind, conceal her true identity under the dress of a man, a masking that becomes all the more complicated when she finds herself/himself in the company of Orlando, the man she loves.  Plays, novels, poems, and films frequently revel in the dramatic potential of such gender play, and in this course we will undertake a survey of such works.  In addition to the role swapping found in As You Like It and in films like Boys Don’t Cry, we will consider stories in which characters actually shift from one sex to another, as in Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, and stories in which desire deviates significantly from convention, as in films like Brokeback Mountain and in James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room.  The course will also consider what some influential theorists, from Plato on up to contemporary critics, have had to say about gender and sexuality.  This writing intensive course will involve several interpretive papers and several exams. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 180A – Remapping: 21st Century Literature and Transnationalism
4 semester hours
MacDonald, Katharine

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
What is the difference between one plot of land and another? Between one person and another? How is identity negotiated in a time in history when we have access to more ideas (and more people) than ever before? What is the difference between a physical place and a website? In the digital age, the concepts of "borders" and "boundaries" are in question. The control of knowledge has, in some ways, become decentralized, with a broader range of people accessing and contributing to culture in a variety of ways. However, new technology brings new challenges as well, including the reconsolidation of some types of power. In this course, we will look at a variety of genres, including fiction, journalism, graphic novels, and film to examine how 21st century literature is remapping our culture, and how the digital age has remapped literature. We will explore a range of texts focused on borders, including collections like The Best American Non-Required Reading and transnational authors like Junot Diaz, to question what the nation, and identity, mean in the 21st century.

 

ENGL 180A – “How Like a God”: Myth, Epic, and Metamorphosis
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce the student to the work of Greco-Roman myth.  With intensive readings of The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, and The Metamorphoses, this course not only will consider the various stories and ideas that myths construct and entail, but also will work to question the more modern myths by which we live today.  As a writing intensive section, this course will require a daily reading journal, several short essays, two examinations, and a final analytical paper.  The course will emphasize student engagement with the readings and ideas, so class sessions will entail lecture but rely heavily upon class participation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with the dominant myths of the ancients, as well as a broadened understanding of those myths by which we live—myths more naively known as reality.

 

ENGL 180A – The Melting Point: The US Short Story

4 semester hours
Ravenwood, Emily

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
This course will introduce students to a great variety of US short stories, and the many distinct cultures they have risen out of.  One of the questions we will focus on is how to describe the interaction of those cultures: as a melting-pot, as a mosaic, as an ongoing conflict?  We will start the course with some practice in how to read analytically, for symbolism and sub-text, and apply those skills to a range of stories from the 18th C to the 21st.  This is a writing intensive course, and will include writing five three-page analytical papers over the course of the term, based on our readings and class discussion.

Because this is an @Witt@Home course, students will be expected to have some familiarity with email, forums, and wikis; instruction in how we will use them in this course will be provided in the first week.  Please also explore the ITS help and information page 

 

ENGL 180A – Black Writers and Artists

4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisite:  English 101E
This course examines contemporary writers and artists of plural-cultural heritage who create as politically positioned “artists of the African diaspora” and who respond to issues of identity in their work.  In this course we will read selected literature from authors whose texts are studied concepts about the influences of race on identity in the US and abroad.  Heavy reading, regular quizzes, and 2 required films.

 

ENGL 200 – Introduction to Literary Studies: The Troubled Self
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 170H or 180A or 190A/C
This introduction to literary studies has two goals:  to sharpen your current reading skills and to expand the range of reading skills at your disposal.  To accomplish the first goal, we will start from the assumption that reading critically involves knowing the kinds of questions to ask of a text.  With that assumption in mind, we will read works in a variety of genres (poems, fiction, drama), and we will identify the kinds of questions that lead us to some meaningful and satisfying interpretations.  We will also take into account how considerations of genre as well as the features of each specific work help guide us in forming these questions. The second goal of the course, expanding your interpretive skills, will involve testing out a variety of perspectives and assumptions in order to further develop (and complicate) our meaning-making practices. In order to give you ample opportunity to try out some of these interpretive approaches—and also to sharpen your writing skills—we’ll have frequent writing assignments including one 8-10 page literary analysis.

 

ENGL 240 – Beginning Creative Writing
4 semester hours
Rambo, Jody

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Rainer Maria Rilke advises the young writer. This course is a place to ask, and ask again, this question. In this workshop for beginning writers, the aim of our collective project will be to generate short stories, poems, and works of creative nonfiction that dare to be artful in fresh, original ways. In this studio workshop-style course, students will engage in a series of interlocking writing exercises that will lead them from their first rough conceptualizations of a story, poem, or essay through its completion and revision.  We will be incorporating readings by great contemporary writers into our assignments, to inspire creativity, as well as spark an ongoing process of becoming a writer by reading, for pleasure, first, but also with attention to how other writers form sentences, structure a plot, create characters, employ detail, dialogue, and figurative language to make their art. Students will exchange work-in-progress for peer critique within a constructive atmosphere – offering a testing ground to determine how each piece of writing is connecting with the reader, successfully coaxing him or her into a new state of mind & heart through each piece of writing. English 240 is Writing Intensive.  It does not meet the Gen.Ed. Arts requirement.  It is a prerequisite for all advanced creative writing courses in the English Department.

 

ENGL 241 – Beginning Journalism
4 semester hours
Fallon, D’Arcy

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
This course provides a basic introduction to the practice and principles of journalism, with an emphasis on writing for newspapers. We will discuss news, features, entertainment stories, opinion and sports writing, as well as interviewing skills, ethics, copy-editing, headline writing, and other related topics. Students will be expected to meet deadlines, do frequent in-class writing exercises, and to thoughtfully and constructively respond to their classmates’ stories. Grades will be based on stories produced, occasional quizzes, and class participation. Students will be required to write at least two stories for The Torch, Wittenberg’s weekly student newspaper.  Prerequisite: English 101.

 

ENGL 242 – Writing Center Theory & Practice
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

Prerequisites:  ENGL 101E and Permission of Instructor
This course will focus on writing processes, interpersonal dynamics, questioning techniques, evaluation of writing-in-progress, and rhetorical theory as they pertain to working one-to-one with writers.  This class, designed primarily to prepare writing advisors for the Wittenberg Writing Center, will require students to spend time in the Writing Center, shadowing veteran advisors and eventually holding some sessions of their own.  By permission of instructor only--students must apply through the Writing Center.  Writing intensive.

 

ENGL 280A – British Literary Genealogies
4 semester hours
Smith, J. Fitzpatrick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 170H or 180A or 190A/C
Description TBA

 

ENGL 290A – American Literary Traditions: Money, Debt and American Dreaming
4 semester hours
Askeland, Lori

Prerequisite:  ENGL 170H, 180A or 190A/C
The average college student leaves four years of college with more than $25,250 in debt. The average new car purchase, on the other hand, is done today with a slightly larger $30,738 loan—and that on a consumer item that loses value the minute we drive it off the lot. Those educations and cars are both supposed to do the same thing, in a way: move us to where we want to go. We beg them: “Take us to freedom and happiness. Take us away from a nightmare vision of poverty, repetitive work and drudgery to a life of middle management success, 2.5 kids and a picket fence!” Car commercials and college brochures promise us open roads and smiling futures; they are a great, open space for American dreaming. And the dream and the debt seem to go hand in hand: the dream makes the taking on of debt feel easy and smart.  It's often only when it's time to pay that the shine can come off—and sometimes a nightmare begins. America has been a land of false advertisements, or at least wildly exaggerated claims, from the start. And it has been a place where, in the pursuit of dreams, debts have piled high. From John Smith's portrait of the US as a place flowing with opportunity and ease, and Mary Rowlandson’s negotiations with her native captors, to Thomas Jefferson’s debt-funded Monticello dreams and Ben Franklin’s ironic frugality, from Thoreau’s cry of “enough!” at Walden Pond and Mark Twain's con men to John Steinbeck’s Okies watching their farms plowed over at the behest of faceless banking conglomerates, Americans have been buying and selling the American dream--or being sold by it, as we'll hear from Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs,  Edgar Allan Poe, Lorraine Hansberry, and more. Writing Intensive. CLAC opportunities available. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 307 – Private Matters, Social Networks: Reading the Eighteenth Century in the Digital Age
4 semester hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequisites: ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A
The eighteenth century USED to be considered the time of the greatest sociological change in both the nature of the private and the public. To engage in the hyperbole of the discipline, it was when the self was invented, and simultaneously when the social grew more pluralistic. The ubiquity of print media—the broadside, the magazine, among other new forms—and the rise of the novel made the world a very different place, representing democratic changes unsettling to those who had long favored the more stable transmission of knowledge found in the reading of classic, long-established texts.  In fact, both the American Revolution and the French Revolution were, in part, attributed to these new reading habits.

Sound familiar? It should. For the eighteenth century has recently been supplanted by our current Digital Age as the time of greatest sociological change in both the nature of the private and the public. Print media is now on its way out and electronic media is causing the same kind of anxieties in the world. What will happen to the book? Is Twitter the new broadside? Is the blog the new novel?  Does Facebook steal from us our privacy or rather give us a new and more impenetrable social mask? The recent revelations regarding the National Security Administration (NSA) suggest that privacy itself may no longer be sustainable in an easily traceable digital world. 

This course will examine the eighteenth century with these contemporary connections in mind. It will focus heavily on classic theories of self/privacy and the emerging theories of the so-called “digital divide.” It will look at the novel (mostly likely Samuel Richardson’s Pamela or Clarissa) as a precursor to Facebook and the blog. It will also look at the art of journal writing in the eighteenth century and its various public and private manifestations, including Defoe’s Journal of a Plague Year, and Samuel Pepys’s, James Boswell’s, and Frances Burney’s personal diaries.  Laurence Sterne’s novel, Sentimental Journey, will help us investigate whether empathy is in decline today because of digital connections, as recent studies have suggested. In addition, the course will look at the emerging poetry of the personal, including that of John Wilmot, Thomas Gray, and William Cowper. At the end of the course, we will focus on electronic media today, and the dystopian predictions of a world without meaning because so much can be so easily said and read. Zombie narratives will also help us understand the dangers of a world where information can go viral and can transform even the most reflective, conscious readers into figures of The Undead.  

Shorter written assignments will ask students to explore the connections between then and now, and each student will post a blog article online making these connections public. A 12-15 page research paper will allow students to explore in detail a topic of their own. The course is writing intensive and will include a midterm and final.

 

ENGL 309 – Victorian Secrets: Mystery, Crime, and Scandal in Victorian Literature
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisites: ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A
Common misperceptions (or partial perceptions) of Victorian literature imagine ladies in hoopskirts and gentlemen with bizarre facial hair enjoying a cup of tea and a lot of repression. But in the atmosphere of burgeoning experience of the world and a rising popular press, Victorians became avid consumers of true crime and scandal—almost as avid as we ourselves are. From body-snatchers to unconsummated marriages to Jack the Ripper, criminal and sexual scandals became subjects of shared obsession among Victorians of every class. We will look at how the rise of the city, the empire, and the popular press brought to the forefront of the Victorian imagination the threat of chaos just underneath the surface of daily life—and the restoration of order. We will read authors such as Dickens, Collins, Eliot, Tennyson, Browning, and Conan Doyle. Written work will include two shorter assignments, quizzes, and a long researched critical argument. Writing intensive. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies.

 

ENGL 315 – Harlem Renaissance
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisites:  ENGL 200 and 290A
The core ideals of the Harlem Renaissance fueled an ideological movement brought about by a keen political awareness of the oppression and inequity that Blacks faced in the United States at the beginning of the 20th century.  Writers of the Harlem Renaissance used this awareness as a tool to reach a large audience of Black and white Americans.  The Harlem Renaissance was an era of enormous literary production written by and about Black Americans. By the end of this course, students will:
(1) recognize major writers of the period
(2) develop an understanding of how race informs literary identity
(3) be acquainted with a selection of women writers of the period
(4) have further advanced skills in critical reading, thinking and writing

 

English 324: Summer Journalism Institute: The Magazine Feature Beat, (4 or 6 semester hours) 

(Note: the contact hours and amount of work justify 6 hours, but we do offer the option of taking the course for either four or six credits depending on students’ financial and/or credit needs.) This four-week course provides in-depth training in feature writing based on a week of interviewing in Clark County. Students will workshop their stories, edit them, and produce a magazine.  Prerequisites: Permission of the department. 

ENGL 331A – Shakespeare
4 semester hours
Buckman, Ty

Prerequisites: ENGL majors: 200 or 280A recommended; non-ENGL majors: Junior standing & completion of one 100-level ENGL course required
Shakespeare survives as the only ‘single-author’ course regularly offered in the English Department at Wittenberg. This version of English 331 is not, however, designed primarily as a Shakespeare survey to introduce students to a writer they surely have already met many times before. The course will endeavor, rather, to build on the knowledge students have already accumulated from previous encounters with Shakespeare to pursue goals broadly in keeping with those of all advanced courses in the English major. The goals of the course, in descending order of importance, include the following: To develop skill in writing and constructing sophisticated arguments. To analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view. To broaden a student’s understanding of literary and aesthetic judgment by extensive reading in the work of one author. And finally, to acquire a basic knowledge of Shakespeare’s life, his plays and their genres, and the culture in which he lived. The various classroom activities and writing assignments have been designed to meet these goals. Students will be expected to prepare for class faithfully, take part in a number of collaborative activities, compile a “commonplace book” of their reading responses, take a midterm exam, and write two papers and a film review.

 

ENGL 340 – Advanced Fiction Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite:  ENGL 240
There is really only one way to become a superior fiction writer: Write, then read, then go write some more.  In this class, we will do plenty of both.  Students will continue developing the skills and techniques introduced in Beginning Creative Writing through readings, discussion, workshopping, journal-keeping and lots of writing.  Each student will produce three short stories and will do a major revision of one of those pieces.  Our goal will be for each student to write at least one story suitable for submission to a literary journal.

 

ENGL 380 – Screening Fiction: Novel to Film
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite:  ENGL 200 or permission of instructor
So-called “classic” literature, as well as popular or “pulp” literature, has always been a rich source for film both in and out of Hollywood.  In recent years Hollywood has drawn more and more heavily on popular writers and familiar literary giants like William Shakespeare and Jane Austen, among others, for its blockbuster movies.  However, the moviemaker’s love affair with literature has been fraught with questions: Should films be “faithful” to the original?  Is the “original” or source more important than the adaptation?  When is an adaptation an adaptation and when is it something else?  Does literature love the cinema as much as cinema seems to love literature?  What does the cinema gain from its close association with literature?  We will consider these questions by looking at a number of literary works and their film adaptation(s) like Frankenstein, Dracula, Fight Club, The English Patient, Romeo and Juliet, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Bladerunner), I Am Legend, and others.  Writing intensive.  One shorter and one longer essay, midterm and final exam.

 

ENGL 403 – Special Projects in Creative Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite:  Department Permission
Special Projects in Creative Writing offers serious creative writing students an opportunity to produce a significant piece in their chosen genre, whether that be fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, or screenwriting.  Using both extensive class workshopping and regular meetings with the professor, students will produce a project of their own design, for example, a novella or novel section, a collection of related short stories, or a theme-driven collection of poems.  Admission to the course is based on a writing sample and a brief written project proposal. 

 

ENGL 405 – Senior Exercises
1 semester hour
Mattison, Michael

Prerequisites:  Senior standing and Department Permission
This one-credit course will prepare students for their comprehensive exam as well as their senior presentation. Students will meet as a group a few times during the semester, and they will need to revise and refine a paper from an earlier class for the presentation. Students will schedule early in the semester a one-to-one session with the professor of that earlier class to seek feedback for revision and then consult with the instructor of 405 regarding subsequent changes. All students will also write an abstract of the senior presentation paper.

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