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Political Science - Spring 2014

POLI 101S 01 & 02 American National Government
4 credits
Rhine, Staci

This course introduces students to American government and politics. The course includes sections on the Constitution, rights and liberties, the major institutions, and political behavior.  Students will use current topics in politics to understand the processes of government.  Classes will be a combination of lecture and discussion. The course material will include several textbooks and The New York Times. There will be three exams, quizzes, and a paper. 10/13
NOTE:  This course is required of all political science majors and minors.

 

POLI 102S 01 Introduction to Comparative Politics
4 credits
Allan, James

This course introduces students to the study of political institutions and political behavior from a comparative perspective. During the course of the semester, the course will focus on political processes and issues in a wide variety of countries, including advanced industrial democracies, communist and post-communist systems, as well as countries in the developing world. A second major objective is to learn basic concepts and techniques used in comparative political analysis. Evaluation will be based on two exams, reading quizzes, and participation in three short political analysis/simulation exercises. 10/13
NOTE: This course is required of all political science majors and minors.

 

POLI 202S Comparative Political Economy & Public Policy
4 credits
Allan, James

This course provides an introduction to understanding the relationship between politics and economics, or to put it another way, between “states and markets.” What is the appropriate role for government in managing the economy? Should politics and economics be completely separate, or are the two inextricably linked? This course examines how great political economists such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and others have addressed these questions. It will also consider, from a comparative  perspective, the variety of ways in which governments and markets actually interact within advanced capitalist democracies through an examination of welfare states. 10/13

 

POLI 216R 01 Family Values: The Politics of Virtue, Care, and Equality
4 credits
Wright, Heather

This course examines the theoretical underpinnings of the contemporary debate over family values.  We will “begin at the beginning,” studying the ancient and modern political philosophers and their profoundly influential conceptions of the proper relationship between the family and public life.  Once we grasp the philosophical foundation, we will move into the contemporary “house.”  We will encounter thoughtful and profound analyses of the conflict of rights involved in these debates over the family. What is the proper relationship between biology and society?  Should the family be regulated, or is it beyond the reach of public political scrutiny?  How does emerging reproductive technology enter into the mix?  Whose side should the state take when the conflict over abortion is represented as a contest between the rights of the fetus and the rights of the mother?  Should we allow genetic manipulation of embryos?  How have adoption, surrogate motherhood, and step-parenting redefined the traditional family?  Is that redefinition reflected in contemporary family law?  How will we care for our children and for our parents in an age in which most everyone, male and female, works outside the home?  Do we need a new family politics? Having completed our consideration of the American debate, we will turn to an illuminating comparative case study: Poland.  The addition of perspectives grounded in a radically different political history, and cultural and religious traditions, will throw the American political landscape into sharp relief. 10/13

 

POLI 219 01 Ethics American and Public Policy
4 credits
Duncan, Christopher

All political and policy questions presuppose a normative or ethical framework. Often this framework is simply assumed without explanation or interrogation. In doing so, policy makers and students of politics alike neglect to account for and examine rigorously and critically the preconceived ethical and moral foundations upon which they base their work and study. This course is designed to accomplish two broad tasks. First, to acquaint the student of American politics and public policy in a systematic manner with the rudiments of various schools of thought concerning moral theory and the larger questions that have emerged from said thought. And second, to demonstrate through various case studies and issues areas how those models have been, and could be, applied to political decisions and policy choices. Topics in the course will include the ethics of war, revolution and violence, property rights and economic inequality, issues around life and death including abortion, euthanasia, and capital punishment, the politics and policies related to race and gender equality, and the ethics of environmental sustainability, as well as others. 10/13

 

POLI 221S 01 State and Local Government
4 credits
Baker, Rob

The course focuses on important contemporary problems and trends affecting state and local politics, and the role of states and localities in the federal system. Using a comparative approach, attention is given to general intergovernmental, social, economic, and cultural influences that shape state and local politics in America. Additionally, a mock state legislature is conducted providing the student with a "hands-on" experience in one of the key political processes of state government. 10/13

 

POLI 224S 01 Presidency           
4 credits
Hasecke, Ed

This course will explore issues in the modern presidency. We will begin with the basic characteristics of the presidency and debate the conflicts inherent in the demands we place on the president. We will then shift to an exploration of presidential success. What makes a president more successful than another?  Students will work together to test hypotheses about presidential success using statistical tools providing the student with a collaborative social science research experience. 10/13

 

POLI 234S 01 Black Politics
4 credits
Young, John

This course will introduce students to the nature of black politics and black political behavior.  The course will inquire into the political dimensions of black life in America and how Black Americans have interpreted and responded to the democratic experiment.  Considerable attention will be given to how individuals, institutions, and protest movements have shaped black political consciousness and black political participation.  Finally, the course will examine the relative impact of black protest politics versus black electoral politics in addressing black political demands. Evaluation will be based on three exams, several quizzes, class participation, and short, one page writing assignments. 10/13

 

POLI 260 1Z Methodology
4 credits
Baker, Rob

The political science methodology course focuses on providing the major with requisite skills needed to conduct research in the field of political science. Emphasis is placed on conceptualization and design of a research project, various data collection methods used in political science, data analysis techniques, both quantitative and qualitative and research report writing. 10/13
NOTE: The course is required for all political science majors.
WRITING INTENSIVE

 

POLI 305 1W European Politics
4 credits
Allan, James

Prerequisites: POLI 102S and Jr/Sr class standing
This seminar course focuses on European politics with special emphasis on changes in political and economic institutions and behavior since World War II. The course covers four main aspects of politics in Europe: i. Political institutions; ii. Political parties and political behavior; iii. Political economy; and iv. the European Union. Although the course is not designed on a country-by-country basis, we will examine most of the European countries (though some countries will get more attention than others). By the end of the class, students should be familiar with the evolution of the states in Europe, the evolution of different democratic political institutions throughout Europe, key differences in the economic institutions in these countries, and the major issues surrounding the future of Europe and the European Union in the wake of the recent global financial crisis. 10/13
WRITING INTENSIVE

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC

Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don't need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in any of the languages taught at Wittenberg: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian or Spanish.
Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department's offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

 

POLI 321 1W Public Policy
4 credits
Hasecke, Ed

Prerequisites:  POLI 101S and Jr class standing
This course is designed to consider the nature of public policy and the challenges that face society as we try to create solutions to difficult problems. The semester begins with theories of justice and then explores the paradoxes that plague public policy. The class then tackles the issue of funding public schools.  Students will perform a statistical analysis of Ohio school districts and research the current funding structure for Ohio schools. Several off-campus experiences are required to gain an understanding of the challenges facing urban schools.  Evaluation will be based on a research paper, essay exams, and additional assignments. 10/13
WRITING INTENSIVE

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