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Biology - Spring 2017

BIOLOGY 125B
Basic Human Physiology

4 credits
Stathopoulos, Andrea
In this course students will learn the anatomy and physiology of the major body systems to gain an understanding of how the body works. Students will also develop critical thinking skills, study current health issues, and be given an opportunity to reflect upon the knowledge they learn. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of the nature of science.

BIOLOGY 146N
Biology on the Big Screen

4 semester hours
Burgett, Amber
This course will address the accuracy with which movies, TV shows, and media outlets portray biological concepts underlying important contemporary issues. The course will focus on four main topics: emerging infectious diseases, global climate change, genetic modification, and biodiversity. Students will gain an understanding of the biological principles and concepts that underpin these often contentious and frequently debated issues. The course will use primary literature and current research within the field to give students an increased scientific awareness and improved scientific literacy. Movie viewings outside of scheduled class times will be required.

BIOLOGY 180B
Concepts of Biology

5 credits
Collier, Matthew; Yoder, Jay
Open to all students planning to major in Biology
A survey of concepts common to most areas of the biological sciences. Topics including the scientific method, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, energy flow, flowering plant and animal biology, and the evolution of diversity will be covered. Prerequisite (with BIOL 170) to all other major courses.

BIOLOGY 210
Molecular Neurobiology

5 credits
McWhorter, Michelle
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
Neurobiology is a vast area of study which includes the study of the proteins and molecules within neurons to how the brain functions to elicit a particular behavior. This course will cover basic molecular and cellular biology in the context of the nervous system, specifically the neuron. During the semester, the course will discuss neurotransmitters, synapses, receptors, neural development, and the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. The laboratory component of the course will consist of a semester long project to identify genes expressed in the nervous system.

BIOLOGY 212
Cell Biology

5 credits
Goodman, Margaret
Prerequisites: Biology 170
Cell biology focuses on the structure and function of the cell, examining individual structures and building toward a synthesis of the dynamic metabolic processes of the cell. These processes include synthesis of cellular components, metabolic pathways, and signaling pathways.

BIOLOGY 221
Pharmacology

4 credits
Pederson, Cathy
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
Humans interact with many pharmacological agents on a regular basis. This course explores the effects of particular medications on a variety of pathological conditions. The medicines investigated include antidepressants, anesthetics, heart medications, oral contraceptives, fertility drugs, and painkillers. We also focus on some recreational drugs.  Students will learn a little basic physiology, pathology, and medications that treat those illnesses.

BIOLOGY 233
Ornithology

5 credits
Ritzenthaler, John
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
Students will investigate the biology, ecology, and identification of birds. We will combine lecture, laboratory, and field experiences to understand taxonomy, structure, behavior, and identification by sight and song. The 400-plus species of birds recorded in Ohio will serve as our basis for our study of the incredible diversity of birds throughout the world.  Several weekend field trips as well as early morning bird walks are required.

BIOLOGY 235
Morphology of Vascular Plants

5 credits
Collier, Matthew
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
This course will cover comparative morphology, anatomy, and life histories of vascular plants (e.g., whisk ferns, ground pines, ferns, horsetails, gymnosperms [ginkgo, cycads, and pines], and angiosperms). Students will also examine classification, nomenclature, relationships, reproduction, and economic importance of vascular plants.

BIOLOGY 237
Microbiology

5 credits
Yoder, Jay
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
Basic principles of bacteriology and virology, stressing structure, metabolism, classification, and application.

BIOLOGY 239
Biology of Marine Invertebrates
5 credits

Reinsel, Kathy; Welch, Jim
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
Over 90% of the world’s animals are invertebrates, and virtually all invertebrate groups have marine representatives. This course will focus on the major invertebrate taxa, examining their distinguishing characteristics in addition to their physiology, ecology, and natural history. In lab, we will observe specimens of many invertebrates, examine and describe the internal and external anatomy of some of them, and experiment with a few. Live specimens will be used whenever possible. Students may also participate in an optional field trip to the Duke Marine Laboratory, where we will collect observe invertebrates in a variety of marine habitats (Biology 258: Extended Field Studies - Marine Invertebrates).

BIOLOGY 242
Behavioral Ecology

5 credits
Burgett, Amber
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
This course will explore how the behavior of organisms contributes to survival and reproductive success of individuals. We will examine the evolution and significance of a wide variety of animal behaviors including life history strategies, foraging decisions, sexual selection and mate choice, cooperation and altruism, parental care, and predator-prey dynamics. This course will draw heavily from primary literature and empirical research of animal behaviors, with an emphasis on current methodology and experimental design. The course will combine weekly discussions, lectures, and labs to provide an overview of the past, present and future of the field of behavioral ecology. A semester-long project will require student groups to design and conduct an observational or manipulative experiment on some aspect of behavioral ecology and present these results in the form of a manuscript and a 15 minute conference style presentation. This course fulfills Group 4 and Zoological requirements for biology majors. Writing intensive.

BIOLOGY 255
Biological Literacy

4 credits
Collier, Matthew; McWhorter, Michelle
Prerequisites: Biology 170 and 180
A study of common sources, methods, and techniques used in scientific writing and in presenting biological literature.  There will be a strong emphasis on bibliographic sources as well as written and oral presentations of biological material.

BIOLOGY 258B
Extended Field Studies
- Ecology
1 credit
Phillips, Richard
Prerequisite: Must take concurrently with Biology 346
We will travel to Mississippi to visit a retired farm with a mix of bottomland hardwood, fallow fields, and pine plantations.  With our bug spray, laptops, and field notebooks, we will compare species composition across taxa and among habitat types. We will also conduct ecological experiments of interest to the individuals in the group. Past projects have included mark-recapture studies of reptiles, distributions of frog species, and tree diameter and lizard size. We will run preliminary analyses to examine ecological similarities and differences among species assemblages in Mississippi and compare those with data collected in Ohio during class labs at Wittenberg. This trip will take place from Friday, March 31, (12:30 p.m.) to Tuesday, April 4, (11 p.m.) and requires a $50 fee for food.

BIOLOGY 258B
Extended Field Studies - Marine Invertebrates

1 credit
Reinsel, Kathy; Welch, Jim
Prerequisite: Must take concurrently with Biology 239.
A 5-day field trip (Tuesday, April 25 - Saturday April 29) to the Duke Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. Students will participate in field trips to marine habitats to observe and collect invertebrates for study and experimentation at Wittenberg.

BIOLOGY 324
Animal Physiology
5 credits
Stathopoulos, Andrea
Prerequisites:  Biology 170, 180, and Chemistry 162

Animal physiology is the study of animal function. In this course we will explore the mechanisms through which animals maintain homeostasis, and how the activities of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems are regulated. In this course we will study the evolution, adaptive significance, and ecological relevance of several physiological traits. We will use a comprehensive approach to understand how animals function within an ecological context, by examining adaptations ranging from the molecular to the organismal level of organization.

BIOLOGY 325
Human Anatomy and Physiology
I
5 credits
Pederson, Cathy
Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180 and one upper-level biology course

Students will learn about the major systems of the human body in both lecture and laboratory. Topics to be discussed include the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Disease states will also be discussed.  Laboratories will focus on the anatomy and physiology of each system as they are discussed in the lecture portion of the course. Laboratories will include dissection. Assessment will include 3 written examinations, lab practical examinations, and a final examination. Offered every year.

BIOLOGY 346
Ecology
5 credits
Phillips, Richard
Prerequisites:  A Biology group 2, 3, or 4 course and Math Placement 2

Ecology is the study of interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. We will examine both theoretical and applied aspects of ecology in the classroom. Laboratories will investigate specific hypothesis from observation to analysis, leading not only to increased knowledge of ecological principles, but also to a more advanced understanding of scientific investigations in stochastic environments. You will be required to analyze datasets as well as present those in both presentation and publication form. This course should prepare students for advanced degrees in ecology as well as provide the framework for novel applications of ecology in other biological fields. This course is both writing and math intensive. There is an optional, but recommended extended field studies associated with the class.

BIOLOGY 406
Senior Capstone
4 credits
Goodman, Margaret
Prerequisite:  Must have senior status

The capstone course uses a topic-driven approach to promote synthesis of biological concepts and emphasize the inter-relatedness of different disciplines within biology. These concepts range from the molecular level through organismal biology to populations and ecosystems. The course will rely heavily on the primary literature with emphasis on the process of scientific discovery. In this course students develop skills in presenting scientific material in both oral and written form. This writing-intensive course is required of all biology majors and is to be taken during the senior year.

 

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