Skip to Content

Philosophy - Spring 2017

PHIL 103R 01
Ethics and Identity

4 Credits
Schoonover, Steven
Prerequisite: None
This is an introductory level course in ethics and identity, exploring the ways our ethical ideals and principles are related both to human nature and to our social roles. Students will reflect on a variety of traditional philosophical and psychological questions, including: How ought one to live? What kind of creatures are we humans? and How do our social roles shape who we become? Students read a variety of contemporary and classic philosophical texts, which serve as a basis for our classroom activities and discussion. Evaluations are based on periodic quizzes, short papers, class participation, and two exams.

PHIL 200R 01 and 02
Law: Near and Far

4 Credits
Schoonover, Steven
Prerequisite: None
This is a course in philosophy of law, exploring fundamental questions about the nature of law in domestic and international contexts. Students will reflect upon not only a variety of traditional philosophical questions regarding the law, but they will do so both within the context of US history and in terms of current forms of international governance, including the operation of the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization. The investigation will sometimes be comparative as we investigate countries that share and do not share US legal institutions. Evaluations are based on periodic quizzes, short papers, class participation, and two exams.

PHIL207R 01
Science in Social Context
4 Credits

McHugh, Nancy
Prerequisite: None
Science in Social Context is a course in environmental and scientific ethics. In this course we study environmental issues and scientific practices by understanding them within a social and cultural framework that both impact these areas and also are impacted by them. In addition to studying ethical theories and environmental ethics, students will study particular areas of concern, such as water resources, wastes, air pollution, the developing world, climate change, animal rights, and biodiversity.

Students will be assessed through weekly quizzes, a collaborative writing assignment, presentation, and final project.

  1. By the end of the semester students should be able to:
  2. Know what an argument is in order to identify, assess and develop arguments.
  3. Critically assess, appreciate and understand a variety of ethical theories and practices from a range of cultural traditions.
  4. Recognize and assess the ways in which humans are immersed in, dependent upon and impact the environment.
  5. Develop and assess recommendations for improving our engagements and impact on/in/with the environment.
  6. Learn to develop formats to present information you’ve gained through research to a broader audience.
  7. Sustain a long term research project about which you can write, speak and visually represent with confidence and knowledge.

PHIL 380R 1W
Topic:  Global Health Justice

4 Credits
McHugh, Nancy
Prerequisite: None.
In Global Health Justice we will be studying the role of justice in its relationship to health issues in the developing world and in the U.S. The goals of the course are: 1. To critically interrogate theories of justice and their applicability to health and medicine. 2. To develop a cross-cultural and intercultural examination of health, medicine and the effects of development, globalization, poverty and affluence on health. 

This course will be taught as an Inside-Out class. Inside-Out classes consist typically of 12-15 outside students, college students living on the outside, and 12-15 inside students, college students who are incarcerated and living on the inside of a prison. Inside and outside students sit side by side in a circle in the classroom, engaged in all of the same readings, all of the same papers, all equally graded. This is the sixth Inside-Out course at Wittenberg. Each one has been a fantastic learning experience for the students and me. We will travel as a group weekly to have class at London Correctional Institute.

By the end of the semester students should be able to:

  1. Critically assess, appreciate and understand a variety of theories of justice and their relationship to each other and to global health.
  2. Understand and apply theories of justice to address and respond to global, national and local instances of health injustice.
  3. Recognize and assess the ways in which humans are immersed in social systems and the ways these facilitate or diminish opportunities for health justice.
  4. Develop an understanding of cultural differences in health needs.
  5. Understand the impact of globalization on the health of people in developing countries, with a focus on countries in Africa and South East Asia, as well as countries that fall in the liminal space between what we label the developing world and the developed world.
  6. Understand the impacts of poverty and class on the health of people in the “developed” world.
  7. Argue a philosophical point effectively and with confidence.
  8. Apply case-based reasoning to study specific instances of health justice.

Students will be assessed through weekly reaction papers that ask them to focus on different aspects of argumentation, such as identifying theses, premises, developing counter arguments. Students will also complete a project on health needs in their community and a project on global health needs with the goal of identifying needs and developing recommendations.

PHIL 400 1W
Senior Capstone
1 Credit
Staff
Pre-requisite: Co-requisite of any 300 level PHIL course except PHIL 310 or 311.

The goal of this course is to complete a senior thesis in philosophy. We will work on writing time management, thesis construction, research techniques, drafting, editing, writing collaboration, paper presentation and critiquing others' work. The course will include a symposium in which students will deliver brief versions of their theses for a department colloquium. Writing intensive.

PHIL 490 00
Independent Study

1-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Permission only.

PHIL 491 00
Internship

1-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Permission only.

PHIL 499 00
Senior Honors Thesis
0-4 credits
Staff
Prerequisite: Departmental Permission.

 

Back to top