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Music Courses & Requirements

alum photo Enter the world of music: music ensembles, vocal and instrumental music lessons, a variety of music courses, a music minor and two music majors.

Music Degrees

Wittenberg offers a music minor and these two music majors:

The B.A. in Music (Bachelor of Arts in Music) leads to many different careers, because it allows considerable flexibility in course selection. It is often combined with a major or minor in another field, such as management, communication, biology, psychology, or English. Some students earn a B.A. in Music as a path toward a career in music therapy.

The B.M.E. (Bachelor of Music Education) leads to certification for public school instruction (choral, instrumental, and general music).

To declare a major or minor in music, print one of these forms and take it to the Music Department office (Krieg Hall): Declaration of Major / Declaration of Minor. Both forms are quick and easy to fill out.

To declare a major in music (B.A. or B.M.E.), it is necessary to perform an audition that demonstrates satisfactory skill in vocal or instrumental performance. Requirements for music degrees may be found in the Wittenberg Academic Catalog. Here is a summary of these requirements:

Course Listings

Click here to read complete descriptions of the Music courses offered at Wittenberg.

B.A. in Music

student photoMusic Theory

  • Music 102A: Basic Music Theory & Skills, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 155: Intermediate Music Theory I, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 257: Intermediate Music Theory II, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 259A: Analysis of Music after 1900, 2 sem hrs

Aural Skills & Dictation

  • Music 156: Intermediate Music Skills I, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 258: Intermediate Music Skills II, 2 sem hrs

Keyboard Skills

  • Music 120: Functional Keyboard Skills, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 221: Advanced Keyboard Skills & Improvisation, 2 sem hrs

Music History / Musicology

  • Music 304H: History of Western Music to 1750, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 305H: History of Western Music, 1750-Present, 4 sem hrs

Other

  • Applied Music Lessons: 4 sem hrs. And recital or studio class performance annually.
  • Music Ensemble: 4 sem hrs. (Participation in music ensemble/ensembles is required of all music majors every semester on campus.)
  • Music 199: Music Practicum (every semester), for non-credit
  • Music 495: Senior Recital and Paper, or Music 498: Senior Project, 2 sem hrs

student photoElectives in Music 10 sem hrs, selected from at least two of these groups:

  • Music theory: Music 214A, 355, 357, 450, or appropriate topics courses (Music 212 or 380)
  • Music history / musicology courses: Music 203A, 205A, 216A/C, 220, or appropriate topics courses (Music 212 or 380)
  • Additional applied music lessons or Music 350 Introduction to Conducting or Music 351 Choral & Instrumental Conducting

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS: 42

B.M.E. (Bachelor of Music Education)

Music Theory

  • Music 102A: Basic Music Theory & Skills, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 155: Intermediate Music Theory I, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 257: Intermediate Music Theory II, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 259A: Analysis of Music after 1900, 2 sem hrs

Aural Skills & Dictation

  • Music 156: Intermediate Music Skills I, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 258: Intermediate Music Skills II, 2 sem hrs

Keyboard Skills

  • Music 120: Functional Keyboard Skills, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 221: Advanced Keyboard Skills & Improvisation, 2 sem hrs

Music History / Musicology

  • Music 304H: History of Western Music to 1750, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 305H: History of Western Music, 1750-Present, 4 sem hrs

Other

  • Applied Music Lessons, primary area: 7 sem hrs. And recital or studio class performance annually.
  • Applied music examination for advanced standing, for non-credit
  • Applied Music Lessons, keyboard area: 2 sem hrs
  • Music Ensemble: 4 sem hrs. (Participation in music ensemble/ensembles is required of all music majors every semester on campus.)
  • Music 199: Music Practicum (every semester), for non-credit
  • Music 216C: Musics of the World, 4 sem hrs

student photoMusic Education and Pedagogy

  • Music 250: Technology for Music Educators, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 350: Introduction to Conducting, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 351: Choral & Instrumental Conducting, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 231, 232, 233, and 234: Instrumental methods & techniques, 1 sem hr each
       - Music 231: Woodwind Instruments
       - Music 232: Brass Instruments
       - Music 233: Percussion Instruments
       - Music 234: String Instruments
  • Music 235: Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy & Diction, 2 sem hrs
  • Music 165: Introduction to Music Education, 3 sem hrs
  • Music 463: General Music Methods, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 464: Choral Music in the Schools, 3 sem hrs
  • Music 465: Instrumental Music in the Schools, 3 sem hrs
  • Music 491: Internship, 2 sem hrs. (The internship will constitute early placement in the student teaching setting several hours per day prior to the start of the student teaching experience.)
  • Music 497: Senior Portfolio Review, for non-credit

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS IN MUSIC: 64

student photoEducation

  • Educ 103 or 104: Sociological Perspectives in Education or Philosophical Perspectives in Education, 4 sem hrs
  • Educ 120: Introduction to Students with Special Needs, 2 sem hrs
  • Educ 203: Early Childhood Development and Education OR Educ 213: Adolescent Development and Education, 3 sem hrs
  • Educ 312: Reading and Writing in Content Areas, 4 sem hrs
  • Educ 495: Student Teaching, 12 sem hrs
  • Successful completion of the State Board of Education Examinations, for non-credit

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS IN EDUCATION: 25

Music Minor

  • Music 102A: Basic Music Theory and Skills, 4 sem hrs
  • Music 110A: Understanding Music, 4 semester Hours
  • Eight credits elected courses in the range from Music 201-220 and/or 301-320
  • Applied Music lessons and/or Music Ensemble, 4 sem hrs

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS: 20

student photoMusic Courses, Lessons, and Ensembles

I. Music Ensembles

Instrumental Ensembles (0 to 1 credit)

173A. Handbell Choir.
175. Jazz Ensemble.
177A. Chamber Orchestra
179A. Symphonic Band.

Choral and Vocal Ensembles (0 to 1 credit)

183. Opera Studio.
185. Wittenberg Choir.
187. Wittenberg Singers.

student photoII. General Classes in Music

Most of the following courses meet general education learning goals. The courses are arranged in accord with the guidelines given below, which serve as prerequisites self-assessed by the student.

Courses at the 100 level: Such courses, generally open to all students, assume no particular familiarity with music and tend to emphasize a substantial number of listening experiences.

Courses at the 200 level: The ability to read music is recommended. Some experience in listening to music is recommended. Further, successful completion of English 101 is recommended.

Courses at the 300 level: Because standard college-level music texts may be used, the ability to read music is required. The student should have the ability to read critically from musical scores and literary sources of the period. Junior standing is recommended.

100A. Fundamentals of Music, Studio. 4 semester hours.
Practical approach to the fundamentals of music, meaning the student gains understanding of how music works through playing it on electronic pianos in a laboratory situation. Virtually no reading - all information is presented in class, demonstrated and then rehearsed by the student. The successful student is able to read music and improvise/harmonize melodies on the keyboard, adding suitable, if simple, accompaniments in several styles. This course is not for the student unwilling to maintain a regular practice schedule. Because the material is cumulative, the learning cannot be delayed. No prerequisite skills. Every year.

101A. Elementary Music Theory. 4 semester hours.
Introductory course designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of how to compose music and how to analyze music using Western conventions developed over the past 1,000 years. The ability to read music is helpful, but not required; music reading will be learned early in the course. Grading is based on several short exams and a term project. By the end of the semester, the student will be able to compose a short musical composition and create an elementary analysis of a major work of music. Both classical and popular music styles will be studied. Every year.

Opera Studio102A. Basic Music Theory and Skills. 4 semester hours.
This is an introductory course designed to give students a fundamental understanding of the basics of music theory. It is intended for the music major/minor who needs to review the basics and intends to continue the study of music at the advanced level. The course is open to non- music majors, the prerequisite being the ability to read music. The course begins with a study of the materials of music - intervals, triads, scales, key signatures, meter, and melodic structure. By the end of the semester, the student has been introduced to the basics of four-part writing with chords in root position. Grading is based upon daily assignments consisting of exercises in each of the areas studied and supplemented with analytical work provided by the instructor. Every year.

110A. Understanding Music. 4 semester hours.
Basic introductory course designed to enable the student to appreciate some of the great works of musical art. A practical knowledge of music is achieved through a variety of guided listening experiences illustrating the various forms and styles of music. May be writing intensive. Every year.

112. Topics. 2-4 semester hours.
Study of subjects, chosen by the instructor, designed to develop perceptive listening and musical literacy. May be writing intensive. This course may be repeated for credit.

203A. The Beatles and Their Predecessors: Musical Style and Social Context. 4 semester hours.
A study of the evolution of American and British popular music from the mid-1950s to about 1970 with a focus on classic rock. Includes a study of the musical styles and social context of Elvis, the Beach Boys, the Beatles, and their immediate predecessors: Little Richard, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Holly. Course includes an analysis of numerous songs in terms of melody, rhythm, harmony and formal structure. In-class lecture, listening and discussion. Out of class listening, reading and writing (journals, short papers and major project). Ability to read music is highly recommended. Alternate years.

205A. Women in Music. 4 semester hours.
Study of women composers and performers who have contributed significantly to the music of Western civilization. Selected readings show the shifting attitudes throughout history toward women in music and the struggles of these women for recognition and survival. Emphasis is placed on perceptive listening skills as well as on an understanding of historical periods and musical styles through recordings and readings. Writing intensive. Every third year.

Wittenberg Choir212. Topics. 2-4 semester hours.
Courses, chosen by the instructor, designed to develop an understanding of significant musical elements through an examination of the interrelations between musical creativity and cultural environment. May be writing intensive. This course may be repeated for credit.

214A. Electronic Music Production. 4 semester hours.
Students will learn to compose and perform electronic music in the manner of many professional pop musicians using Ableton Live and companion software applications. Styles of music explored include Ambient, House, Chiptune, Breakbeat, and Hip-Hop. Basic recording and mixing techniques will also be covered. No prior composition experience or ability to read music is necessary. Examples of artists will be presented and made available for outside of class reference and listening.

216A/C. Musics of the World. 4 semester hours.
The world's musics are as diverse as its lands, peoples, cultures, and languages. In this course, the student studies the music and culture of several disparate societies, seeking answers to the following questions: What technical aspects create a music's unique sound? What role does music play in the lives of its composers, performers and listeners, and what other elements of culture (language, art, literature, society, etc.) are relevant to the study of a society's music? Primarily the study of the musics and cultures of Africa, India, Indonesia and Latin America. Serves as an introduction to research methods in "ethnomusicology" (the study of music in culture). Grading is based on exams, a major paper and class participation. Every year.

220. Introduction to Church Music. 4 semester hours.
Study of areas of concern common to all Christian denominations regarding the practice of sacred music in the context of worship. Deals with historical background of worship of the Judeo-Christian tradition, liturgies, theology of worship and the place of music in worship. Also included is a synopsis of hymnic materials as they have developed from the early Christian Church through the 20th century. Required for church music majors; however, it is open to any student interested in the study of worship and its music. Of particular interest to religion majors. Every third year.

304H. History of Western Music to 1750. 4 semester hours.
Study of the important musical developments from ancient Greek and early Christian music through the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras and of the composers whose creativity brought new musical ideas to fruition. Styles and forms and the dynamics of change are researched through listening, reading and analysis. Required for music majors. Writing intensive. Every year.

305H. History of Western Music 1750-Present. 4 semester hours.
Survey of music history and literature from the beginnings of the Classic style to the end of the Romantic era. Required for music majors. Writing intensive. Every year.

student photoIII. Applied Music Lessons

Students may register for one half-hour lesson per week in Applied Music and earn one credit, or a one-hour lesson per week and earn two credits. Two levels of applied instruction are available, with initial enrollment at the 100 level. Students may enroll in Advanced Applied Music at the 300 level after successfully completing an applied examination, usually given at the end of the second year of study, to determine competency. Applied Music lessons are graded with letter grades unless a student chooses a Pass/Fail option.

  • 121/321: Applied Organ.
  • 122/322: Applied Piano.
  • 123/323: Applied Harpsichord.
  • 124/324: Applied Voice.
  • 125/325: Applied Violin.
  • 126/326: Applied Viola.
  • 127/327: Applied Violoncello.
  • 128/328: Applied Bass.
  • 129/329: Applied Classic Guitar.
  • 130/330: Applied Harp.
  • 131/331: Applied Flute.
  • 132/332: Applied Oboe.
  • 133/333: Applied Clarinet.
  • 134/334: Applied Saxophone.
  • 135/335: Applied Bassoon.
  • 136/336: Applied Horn.
  • 137/337: Applied Trumpet.
  • 138/338: Applied Trombone.
  • 139/339: Applied Euphonium.
  • 140/340: Applied Tuba.
  • 141/341: Applied Percussion.
  • 145/345: Applied Composition.

Symphonic BandIV. Intensive Music Classes

The course Music 102A serves as prerequisite for courses in music theory and music skills taught as two pairs of offerings, Music 155/156 and 257/258. The courses in each pair should be taken concurrently and each pair should be taken consecutively.

120. Functional Keyboard Skills. 2 semester hours.
A course designed to develop basic keyboard skills needed by non-keyboard music majors. Rudiments of theory, keyboard technique and harmonization will be covered. Taught in the electronic keyboard lab. Every year.

155. Intermediate Music Theory I. 2 semester hours.
Begins with a review of the materials of music-scales, intervals and triads during the first two weeks of the semester. The course proceeds into harmonic progressions, first with the major mode and then the minor mode, along with the principles of voice leading, open and close positions, and rules of motion as set forth in the Common Practice Period (1600-1825). Chords of inversion, nonharmonic tones, cadence, dominant seventh chords and secondary dominants (borrowed chords) complete the course. Exercises in each of these areas are provided in the text and supplemented with analytical work provided by the instructor. Grading is based on daily assignments. It is recommended that Music 155 be taken concurrently with Music 156: Intermediate Music Skills I. Prerequisite Music 102 or equivalent skill level. Every year.

156. Intermediate Music Skills I. 2 semester hours.
(1) Sight Singing: Primary goal is to learn to perform at sight any pattern of pitches or rhythms in order to facilitate the student's playing, singing, conducting, composing and studying music. Grading is based on performance exams given daily. Significant and regular outside practice is required. In this, the first semester of Sight Singing, the following material is covered: Pitch, diatonic melodies using conjunct motion and disjunct motion within the tonic and dominant chords; C clefs; diatonic melodies using disjunct motion within the subdominant, supertonic and dominant seventh chords; and Rhythm: fundamental rhythm patterns in common simple and compound meters: irregular division of the beat. Music 102 (2) Ear Training: The student learns to understand and notate pitch patterns and rhythm patterns presented aurally. Grading is based on dictation exams given approximately every other week. In this first semester of Ear Training, material covered will match that included in Sight Singing. In addition, harmonic dictation in major keys will be included. It is recommended that Music 156 be taken concurrently with Music 155: Intermediate Music Theory I. Prerequisite: Music 102 or equivalent or placement by examination. Every year.

199. Music Practicum.
Non-credit course required of all music majors every term on campus. Monitors attendance and participation by the music major at concert and recital events, special workshops and clinics. Every year.

221. Advanced Keyboard Skills and Improvisation. 2 semester hours.
A course designed to develop more advanced skills needed by non-keyboard music majors and assist them to pass their respective keyboard proficiencies. Prerequisite: Music 120 or equivalent skills. Taught in the electronic keyboard lab. Every year.

235. Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy & Diction. 2 semester hours.
Applied class instruction in vocal techniques, emphasizing voice pedagogy, teaching procedures and materials, and lyric diction. The course includes a basic study in the pronunciation and application of the English language as it relates to singing through the use of the international Phonetic Alphabet. Applicable to all students of voice and required of all voice performance and music education majors.

236. Foreign Language Lyric Dictions. 2 semester hours.
Presents a basic study in the pronunciation and the application of the Italian, German, and French languages as these relate to singing through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Materials for the class include David Adams' A Handbook of Diction for Singers; Joan Wall's International Phonetic Alphabet for Singers; and examples of repertoire, primarily art songs, from a variety of periods and styles. Applicable to all students of voice and required of all voice performance majors.

Music 102257. Intermediate Music Theory II. 2 semester hours.
Since this course resumes study after a three-month recess, the first week is spent reviewing all four-part writing principles of the Common Practice Period, beginning with secondary dominants, the last area studied in Music 155. The course proceeds with studies in musical texture, diminished seventh chords, non-dominant sevenths, dominant ninths, 11ths, 13ths, chromatically altered chords, the Neapolitan sixth, augmented sixths, and other chromatic chords. A final project consists of an original composition based upon a text selected by the student, an original melody and four-part harmonization incorporating as much of the harmonic vocabulary available to the student following completion of this course. Daily exercises in each of the areas studied are provided in the text supplemented with analytical work provided by the instructor. Grading is based on results of daily assignments. It is recommended that Music 257 be taken concurrently with Music 258: Intermediate Music Skills II. Prerequisite: Music 155. Every year.

258. Intermediate Music Skills II. 2 semester hours.
The following material is covered: Pitch: chromatic melodies in major and minor, medieval modes, highly chromatic melodies, modulation and extended melodies; rhythm: syncopation, complex syncopation and musical excerpts (Medieval through Modern). Ear Training: The student learns to understand and notate pitch patterns and rhythm patterns presented aurally. Grading is based on dictation exams, given approximately every other week. Material covered will match the work being done in Sight Singing. In addition, harmonic dictation in major and minor keys will be included. It is recommended that Music 258 be taken concurrently with Music 257: Intermediate Music Theory II. Prerequisite: Music 156. Every year.

Symphonic Band259A. Analysis of Music After 1900. 2 semester hours.
An introduction to the basic theoretical concepts for post-tonal music of the 20th century. Students will also review the latest theoretical tools in analyzing and creating post-tonal music. The student's grade will be based on homework assignments and tests. Prerequisite: Music 257 or permission of the instructor.

350. Introduction to Conducting. 2 semester hours.
Introduces and develops the skills necessary for a musician to conduct an ensemble. The style and mechanics of the physical art of conducting are discussed each class period. The student applies this knowledge by conducting an ensemble consisting of members of the class. A daily grade will be given for individual preparation and class participation. There will be discussions and written exams covering musical terminology and instrumental transposition as found in scores. Each week exercises that develop coordination and rhythm will be performed and graded. The course will conclude with a discussion of various methods of score study and score preparation. Prerequisites: Music 257, 258, or permission of instructor. Alternate years.

351. Choral and Instrumental Conducting. 2 semester hours.
Continuation of Music 350. Prerequisite: Music 350.

355. Studies in Counterpoint. 3 semester hours.
Designed to develop an awareness and understanding of contrapuntal writing and techniques through reading, analysis of musical examples, workbook exercises and original composition. Prerequisites: Music 257 and 258. Alternate years.

357. Orchestration. 3 semester hours.
The student learns to write for each instrument found in a concert band and an orchestra and to write for these instruments in various combinations. The course also deals with the principles of scoring for a concert band and an orchestra as well as solutions to problems one encounters in making a score. The course uses a lecture/discussion format. The student's grade will be based on a combination of assignments, quizzes, a written midterm exam and a final orchestration project. Prerequisites: Music 257 and 258. Alternate years.

student photo380. Topics in Music. 2-4 semester hours.
Designed for the major in music, this course may explore intensively such topics as score reading, advanced conducting, composition and the art of accompaniment, when student interest and faculty availability warrant. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be writing intensive. Course may be repeated for credit.

450. Form and Analysis. 4 semester hours.
Comprehensive study of analytical techniques designed to give the student the tools for understanding the compositional processes of a wide spectrum in music. Prerequisite: Music 257 or permission of instructor. Alternate years.

470. Problems in Pedagogy and Literature. 4 semester hours.
Course in group and private teaching of a specific applied instrument or of the voice and its literature. Includes aims, objectives, and procedures of applied teaching and principles of learning. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered as needed.

490. Independent Study. 2 or more semester hours.
Individual project as arranged by the student with the supervising professor and the department chair. May be writing intensive. Every year. This course may be repeated for credit.

491. Internship. 2 to 4 semester hours.
Supervised learning-work experience at an on-or off-campus site. Generally pursued during the senior year. Usually involves a written report, a journal, or other assignments. Every year. This course may be repeated for credit.

student photo495. Senior Recital. 2 semester hours.
Presentation of a full-length recital in the primary area of applied music study. A challenging program to be determined in consultation with the applied music teacher. Designed as a culmination of preceding studies. A written paper of moderate length and relating to some aspect of the program is also required. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student's previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Prerequisite: At least three terms of advanced study in the primary area of applied music, senior standing and concurrent registration in the area of advanced applied study. Every year.

496. Senior Recital and Paper with Honors. 2 semester hours.
Prerequisite: 3.50 GPA, applied lessons at the 300-level, and permission of the Department Chair.

497. Senior Portfolio Review. No credit.
Presentation of selected class work and related materials and resources, and the demonstration of musical skills and competencies in an oral examination format before a committee of three faculty members. Required of the major in music education. The review and examination should occur at the beginning of the senior year and at least one full semester prior to the student taking Education 495: Student Teaching. Every year

498. Senior Project. 2 semester hours.
Full-scale investigation of a selected topic or a production of a creative project. Usually presented in a written form. The project is juried by a committee of three faculty members. Both the project and the committee are determined by the end of the student's junior year and in consultation with the academic adviser and the Department Chair. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student's previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Writing intensive. Every year.

499. Honors Thesis/Project. Variable credit.
Prerequisite: 3.50 GPA and permission of the Department Chair.

performer photoV. Music Education Classes

165. Introduction to Music Education. 3 semester hours.
Comprehensive survey of the problems and the scope of music education in the school. Includes the development of fundamental, instrumental, and vocal skills and teaching techniques. Also developed is the ability to use effectively a fretted instrument as a pedagogical tool. Includes field-based experience. Alternate years.

231, 232, 233, 234, 235: Vocal and Instrumental Teaching Methods/Classes.
Applied class instruction in various groups of instruments and in vocal techniques with emphasis on teaching techniques and procedures. Teaching materials are surveyed. At least two courses each year.

  • 231: Woodwind Instruments. 1 semester hour
  • 232: Brass Instruments. 1 semester hour
  • 233: Percussion Instruments. 1 semester hour
  • 234: String Instruments. 1 semester hour
  • 235: Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Diction. 2 semester hours

250. Technology for Music Educators. 2 semester hours.
A course that will introduce the student to the basics of technology as it relates to teaching music in the schools. The student will gain general skills and knowledge of current technology in the following areas: the Internet, computer-assisted instruction, desktop publishing, music notation, music sequencing, digital audio and multimedia. The student's grade will be based on quizzes and the completion of six projects. Prerequisite: Music 102 and 155, or permission of the instructor.

463. General Music Methods. 4 semester hours.
Intensive study of materials and methods used in teaching music pre-K through Grade 12 by a music-teaching specialist, including performer photo classroom courses such as general music and music appreciation. Also includes exploratory teaching in the schools. Prerequisites: Music 165 and Education 103 or 104 or permission of instructor. Alternate years.

464. Choral Music in the School. 3 semester hours.
Study of materials and methods for teaching music in junior, middle and senior high schools with emphasis upon classroom courses such as music history, music theory, etc., as well as the study of vocal problems and techniques of the changing voice and its application to junior and senior high school choral groups. Includes exploratory teaching in the public school. This course satisfies requirements for a teaching licensure in the area of music. Prerequisite: Music 165 and Education 103 or 104. Alternate years.

465. Instrumental Music in the School. 3 semester hours.
Integrated course including the problems involved in the organization and administration of an instrumental music program also dealing with the organization, planning and design requisite for performances given by the marching band. Laboratory experience in the care and repair of instruments and the purchase of supplies and equipment. Include exploratory teaching. Prerequisites: Music 165, 231, 232, 233, and 234 and Education 103 and 104. Alternate years.

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