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Doug Andrews, Ph.D.

Doug Andrews, Ph.D.
Professor of Statistics
BDK Science Center 329P
(937) 327-7863
dandrews@wittenberg.edu

As the department's lone statistician, Dr. Douglas M. Andrews is primarily responsible for the curriculum in statistics and probability. In addition to creating introductory and advanced courses for math majors and for non-majors alike, Andrews created and continues to administer Wittenberg's statistics minor program. He is quite active in the national statistics education community, reviewing numerous articles and texts and serving on the editorial board for the Journal of Statistics Education, presenting his work at statistics education conferences and at other colleges and universities, and reading for the AP Statistics program.

Aside from the usual academic publications and presentations, his non-teaching professional activity includes statistical consulting jobs for industry, health care, pharmaceutical research, law enforcement, and non-profit organizations. Andrews has also served as Vice President for the regional chapter of the American Statistical Association, and has served in the ASA's committee structure as well.

He earned a B.A. in Russian and mathematics from St. Olaf College in 1984, and he came to Wittenberg in 1989 after an M.S. and Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State. Andrews was promoted to Professor of Statistics in 2004.

Dr. Andrews is also an avid figure in the Wittenberg community. Every year since 2001, he has planned the Wittenberg Triathlon. The Wittenberg Triathlon is a three part race open to individuals or teams of faculty, staff, students, and alumni from Wittenberg. A little known fact about the "Lone Statistician" is that he is musically inclined! Along with some other faculty and their spouses, he plays bass in an old fashioned fiddle band called, "Stuffed Possum and Cornbread" that supports organizations for social and environmental change. In addition to playing bass, he has also built his own dulcimer and taught himself how to play.

One piece of advice to students: "Learn to be flexible while you are young."

 

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